Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

HI-RES€17.49
CD€14.99

Pop - Released October 25, 2019 | Atlantic Records UK

Hi-Res
HI-RES€25.99
CD€22.49

Pop - Released June 26, 2020 | Atlantic Records UK

Hi-Res
Much like its predecessor, 2017's The Afterlove, James Blunt's sixth full-length, Once Upon a Mind, matches his familiar voice and introspective lyrics with polished pop production. As with prior efforts, Blunt's vocals are the most vital aspect of Once, mostly because they are so recognizable. Otherwise, without them, these songs could belong to anyone. With a team of pop songwriters, the 11 selections on the LP shift between catchy ditties (which sound like late-era Mumford and Sons, OneRepublic, or Maroon 5 mashed with Avicii leftovers) and plaintive moments of vulnerability that faintly hint at his hit debut Back to Bedlam. Upbeat highlights like "The Truth" and "5 Miles" briefly energize the album, while the anthemic motivators such as "Champions" and "Halfway" offer empowering singalongs. Cutting to the core, the heartbreaking "Monsters" and "How It Feels to Be Alive" deal with his father, while "I Told You" and "The Greatest" are gems of wisdom written for his children and future generations. It's all pleasant and comforting stuff, but ultimately, Once Upon a Mind plays it safe and doesn't leave a lasting impression. © Neil Z. Yeung /TiVo
HI-RES€17.49
CD€14.99

Pop - Released October 4, 2005 | Custard - Atlantic

Hi-Res Booklet
HI-RES€22.49
CD€19.49

Pop - Released October 21, 2013 | Custard - Atlantic

Hi-Res
HI-RES€17.49
CD€14.99

Pop - Released October 4, 2005 | Custard - Atlantic

Hi-Res
HI-RES€23.49
CD€20.49

Pop - Released September 17, 2007 | Custard - Atlantic

Hi-Res
For as big a hit as it was, "You're Beautiful" wasn't necessarily representative of what kind of a singer/songwriter James Blunt is. It wasn't necessarily inaccurate, but it was misleading, suggesting that all this tremulously tuneful singer/songwriter wants to do is be sensitive -- that he aimed himself squarely at the middle of the road, crafting gentle music for housewives. That's not quite the case, as his 2007 sophomore effort, All the Lost Souls, makes plain. Surely, Blunt is wholly mainstream, a slicker, spirited variation on David Gray's elegantly upscale folk-pop, but he's not crassly commercial, deciding to disregard the path toward stultifying adult contemporary -- a path that "You're Beautiful" certainly pointed toward -- but he's also choosing to not write happy, harmless pop like Daniel Powter, still dwelling on moody, introspective midtempos. In other words, he still adheres to the Gray template the second time around, but he opens things up slightly with some spacy textures reminiscent of Coldplay and a heavy dose of classic popcraft, learned equally from Elton John, David Bowie, and Paul McCartney. Oddly, the sum total of these influences turns Blunt into the heir to that forgotten strain of wimpy, wispy songwriter-driven British pop of the '70s embodied by such once-stars as Al Stewart, Leo Sayer, and Gilbert O'Sullivan. The ghost of Gilbert echoes throughout "One of the Brightest Stars," and while this allusion is quite likely inadvertent, it also doesn't seem to be a coincidence that the opening song (and first single) on All the Lost Souls is a song that celebrates "1973," because much of this album feels like it could have been recorded and released during that mid-'70s heyday of sensitive pop. The main difference is not the clean, modern production with its slight digital flourishes -- things that push the rhythms forward on "Give Me Some Love," one of the livelier moments here -- but that Blunt isn't some quivering bedsit bard; he's the babe who enthusiastically shed his clothes in the "You're Beautiful" video, somebody whose confidence infuses his brokenhearted laments and makes them feel not quite so melancholy. This makes All the Lost Souls soothing, not haunting, and it also removes many of the quirks that distinguished '70s albums by McCartney, O'Sullivan, Sayer, and Elton, so this won't quite seduce that kind of pop fan (although this may hold more interest for them than they might initially think), nor will it win over anybody who can't quite get past the garbled, strangled soul affections of his voice, which remains his greatest liability -- but it will seduce anybody already won over by his 2005 debut, Back to Bedlam, since it's a tighter, more assured record than that. But chances are, they were seduced by Blunt already. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
HI-RES€17.49
CD€14.99

Pop - Released November 8, 2010 | Custard - Atlantic

Hi-Res
HI-RES€2.99
CD€2.29

Pop - Released August 29, 2019 | Atlantic Records UK

Hi-Res
CD€16.99

Pop - Released August 8, 2005 | Custard - Atlantic

HI-RES€17.49
CD€14.99

Pop - Released October 21, 2013 | Atlantic Records UK

Hi-Res
CD€14.99

Pop - Released October 4, 2005 | Atlantic Records

British ex-military singer/songwriter and consummate lady's man James Blunt watched his career go from coffeehouses to stadiums in 2005 with the smash hit "You're Beautiful." Blunt's Rod Stewart-esque croak, wry humor, and earnest balladry is on full display for WEA International's Chasing Time: The Bedlam Sessions, a two-disc collection of live performances, interviews, documentaries, and videos that showcases the amorous Brit's winning stage presence and talented band as they play in Ireland and at the BBC. There's a lot to see here for an artist with only one record under his belt, and listeners just warming to the artist's throaty tenor may be better off picking up Back to Bedlam, but for fans looking for a glimpse of the "real" James Blunt, these Bedlam Sessions are gold at the end of the rainbow. © James Christopher Monger /TiVo
CD€17.49

Pop - Released March 24, 2017 | Atlantic Records UK

Video
On his fifth full-length, The Afterlove, British singer James Blunt makes a risky shift in his sensitive-guy-with-a-guitar sound, opting for a taut collection that tugs at the heartstrings with polished pop sheen. The slight departure seems to be a conscious decision, as the confidently self-aware Blunt sings that he "would have said 'you're beautiful'/but I used that line before," referencing his inescapable 2005 smash single. Recruiting OneRepublic's Ryan Tedder and Ed Sheeran on production, writing, and occasional backing vocals (the trio even joins forces on the pastoral "Time of Our Lives"), Blunt presents his most mainstream offering yet. Indeed, at certain points, his trademark wounded falsetto drifts into Adam Levine territory, turning songs like the soaring "Bartender," the pulsing "California," and the shimmering "Lose My Number" into the best Maroon 5 songs released in 2017. For longtime fans, these changes might be jarring. Even peppier tracks from the Mumford-esque Moon Landing -- take "Heart to Heart" for example -- had the distinct feeling that a band was at least somewhere in the vicinity during the recording sessions. And yet, Afterlove is not Blunt selling his soul to the pop gods. Standout "Don't Give Me Those Eyes" is Blunt's dramatic soft rock at its moving best, riding a pensive piano and orchestra to great emotional effect. The Sheeran-produced "Make Me Better" is genuine and sweet, while "Heartbeat" swells with urgency and drama. Earnest toe-tapper "Someone Singing Along" combines his past and present sounds with his affable personality most seamlessly, weaving guitar twang with a thumping heart as Blunt sings "even if some notes are wrong/I'm hoping someone's singing along/'cause just one voice is not enough/I need to hear from everyone/and even when I'm dead and gone/I'm hoping someone's singing along." Even though he's calling for empathy and strength, his own dreams of the music outliving the man seep through the finer points of the big message. Although he's pretty much guaranteed that legacy with "You're Beautiful," Afterlove is a brave bid for contemporary relevance in 2017, a wonderful step outside his comfort zone that is more memorable and exciting than much of his output this decade. © Neil Z. Yeung /TiVo
CD€16.99

Pop - Released September 17, 2007 | Custard - Atlantic

HI-RES€17.49
CD€14.99

Pop - Released September 17, 2007 | Custard - Atlantic

Hi-Res
CD€12.49

Pop - Released October 4, 2005 | Atlantic Records

CD€19.49

Pop - Released October 21, 2013 | Custard - Atlantic

Videos
HI-RES€17.49
CD€14.99

Pop - Released March 24, 2017 | Atlantic Records UK

Hi-Res Video
On his fifth full-length, The Afterlove, British singer James Blunt makes a risky shift in his sensitive-guy-with-a-guitar sound, opting for a taut collection that tugs at the heartstrings with polished pop sheen. The slight departure seems to be a conscious decision, as the confidently self-aware Blunt sings that he "would have said 'you're beautiful'/but I used that line before," referencing his inescapable 2005 smash single. Recruiting OneRepublic's Ryan Tedder and Ed Sheeran on production, writing, and occasional backing vocals (the trio even joins forces on the pastoral "Time of Our Lives"), Blunt presents his most mainstream offering yet. Indeed, at certain points, his trademark wounded falsetto drifts into Adam Levine territory, turning songs like the soaring "Bartender," the pulsing "California," and the shimmering "Lose My Number" into the best Maroon 5 songs released in 2017. For longtime fans, these changes might be jarring. Even peppier tracks from the Mumford-esque Moon Landing -- take "Heart to Heart" for example -- had the distinct feeling that a band was at least somewhere in the vicinity during the recording sessions. And yet, Afterlove is not Blunt selling his soul to the pop gods. Standout "Don't Give Me Those Eyes" is Blunt's dramatic soft rock at its moving best, riding a pensive piano and orchestra to great emotional effect. The Sheeran-produced "Make Me Better" is genuine and sweet, while "Heartbeat" swells with urgency and drama. Earnest toe-tapper "Someone Singing Along" combines his past and present sounds with his affable personality most seamlessly, weaving guitar twang with a thumping heart as Blunt sings "even if some notes are wrong/I'm hoping someone's singing along/'cause just one voice is not enough/I need to hear from everyone/and even when I'm dead and gone/I'm hoping someone's singing along." Even though he's calling for empathy and strength, his own dreams of the music outliving the man seep through the finer points of the big message. Although he's pretty much guaranteed that legacy with "You're Beautiful," Afterlove is a brave bid for contemporary relevance in 2017, a wonderful step outside his comfort zone that is more memorable and exciting than much of his output this decade. © Neil Z. Yeung /TiVo
CD€14.99

Pop - Released March 24, 2017 | Atlantic Records UK

Video
On his fifth full-length, The Afterlove, British singer James Blunt makes a risky shift in his sensitive-guy-with-a-guitar sound, opting for a taut collection that tugs at the heartstrings with polished pop sheen. The slight departure seems to be a conscious decision, as the confidently self-aware Blunt sings that he "would have said 'you're beautiful'/but I used that line before," referencing his inescapable 2005 smash single. Recruiting OneRepublic's Ryan Tedder and Ed Sheeran on production, writing, and occasional backing vocals (the trio even joins forces on the pastoral "Time of Our Lives"), Blunt presents his most mainstream offering yet. Indeed, at certain points, his trademark wounded falsetto drifts into Adam Levine territory, turning songs like the soaring "Bartender," the pulsing "California," and the shimmering "Lose My Number" into the best Maroon 5 songs released in 2017. For longtime fans, these changes might be jarring. Even peppier tracks from the Mumford-esque Moon Landing -- take "Heart to Heart" for example -- had the distinct feeling that a band was at least somewhere in the vicinity during the recording sessions. And yet, Afterlove is not Blunt selling his soul to the pop gods. Standout "Don't Give Me Those Eyes" is Blunt's dramatic soft rock at its moving best, riding a pensive piano and orchestra to great emotional effect. The Sheeran-produced "Make Me Better" is genuine and sweet, while "Heartbeat" swells with urgency and drama. Earnest toe-tapper "Someone Singing Along" combines his past and present sounds with his affable personality most seamlessly, weaving guitar twang with a thumping heart as Blunt sings "even if some notes are wrong/I'm hoping someone's singing along/'cause just one voice is not enough/I need to hear from everyone/and even when I'm dead and gone/I'm hoping someone's singing along." Even though he's calling for empathy and strength, his own dreams of the music outliving the man seep through the finer points of the big message. Although he's pretty much guaranteed that legacy with "You're Beautiful," Afterlove is a brave bid for contemporary relevance in 2017, a wonderful step outside his comfort zone that is more memorable and exciting than much of his output this decade. © Neil Z. Yeung /TiVo
HI-RES€17.49
CD€14.99

Pop - Released October 4, 2005 | Custard - Atlantic

Hi-Res Booklet
HI-RES€2.99
CD€2.29

Pop - Released October 18, 2019 | Atlantic Records UK

Hi-Res