Your basket is empty

Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

HI-RES€20.49
CD€17.49

Alternative & Indie - Released March 3, 1998 | Reprise

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Hi-Res Audio
CD€16.99

Alternative & Indie - Released January 28, 1994 | Reprise

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Green Day couldn't have had a blockbuster without Nirvana, but Dookie wound up being nearly as revolutionary as Nevermind, sending a wave of imitators up the charts and setting the tone for the mainstream rock of the mid-'90s. Like Nevermind, this was accidental success, the sound of a promising underground group suddenly hitting its stride just as they got their first professional, big-budget, big-label production. Really, that's where the similarities end, since if Nirvana were indebted to the weirdness of indie rock, Green Day were straight-ahead punk revivalists through and through. They were products of the underground pop scene kept alive by such protagonists as All, yet what they really loved was the original punk, particularly such British punkers as the Jam and Buzzcocks. On their first couple records, they showed promise, but with Dookie, they delivered a record that found Billie Joe Armstrong bursting into full flower as a songwriter, spitting out melodic ravers that could have comfortably sat alongside Singles Going Steady, but infused with an ironic self-loathing popularized by Nirvana, whose clean sound on Nevermind is also emulated here. Where Nirvana had weight, Green Day are deliberately adolescent here, treating nearly everything as joke and having as much fun as snotty punkers should. They demonstrate a bit of depth with "When I Come Around," but that just varies the pace slightly, since the key to this is their flippant, infectious attitude -- something they maintain throughout the record, making Dookie a stellar piece of modern punk that many tried to emulate but nobody bettered. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
HI-RES€20.49
CD€17.49

Alternative & Indie - Released May 15, 2009 | Reprise

Hi-Res Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
HI-RES€39.99
CD€33.99

Alternative & Indie - Released December 7, 2012 | Reprise

Hi-Res Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
HI-RES€20.49
CD€17.49

Alternative & Indie - Released December 7, 2012 | Reprise

Hi-Res Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
HI-RES€20.49
CD€17.49

Alternative & Indie - Released September 25, 2012 | Reprise

Hi-Res Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
HI-RES€20.49
CD€17.49

Alternative & Indie - Released November 9, 2012 | Reprise

Hi-Res Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
HI-RES€15.99
CD€13.49

Alternative & Indie - Released December 4, 2012 | Reprise

Hi-Res Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
HI-RES€17.49
CD€14.99

Alternative & Indie - Released February 7, 2020 | Reprise

Hi-Res Booklet
Billie Joe Armstrong’s band is back with Father Of All Motherf***ers, a manifesto of pure rage if ever there was one. Ten tracks make up twenty-five minutes of Green Day intensity that they have not displayed for a long time. When words, actions and even protests no longer have any effect, the only response possible is to let the decibels speak instead of the fists. Catchy and unpredictable, the only thing left to do is to headbang and admit defeat during the stronger moments like during the eponymous track, or the airy Oh Yeah with its unwavering rhythm. Green Day is not only able to sing loud and fast, as proven by the poignant Junkies On A High which employs a well-used catchy melody. The closing song Graffitia is a fierce old-school frenzy which is capable of getting anyone nearby up to dance. Father Of All… (its more marketable alternative name) is the album which has the fire that was perhaps missing from a few of their latest records. It’s a real pleasure to hear the Californians regain all that rage that we were suspecting was beginning to diminish. © Maxime Archambaud/Qobuz
HI-RES€23.49
CD€20.49

Alternative & Indie - Released November 17, 2017 | Reprise

Hi-Res
HI-RES€17.49
CD€14.99

Alternative & Indie - Released January 28, 1994 | Reprise

Hi-Res
CD€16.99

Alternative & Indie - Released October 14, 1997 | Reprise

HI-RES€17.49
CD€14.99

Alternative & Indie - Released September 19, 2000 | Reprise

Hi-Res
HI-RES€73.99
CD€63.99

Alternative & Indie - Released December 22, 2009 | Reprise

Hi-Res
HI-RES€17.49
CD€14.99

Alternative & Indie - Released October 14, 1997 | Reprise

Hi-Res
Following the cool reception to Insomniac, Green Day retreated from the spotlight for a year to rest and spend time with their families. During that extended break, they decided to not worry about their supposedly lost street credibility and make an album according to their instincts, which meant more experimentation and less of their trademark punk-pop. Of course, speedy, catchy punk is at the core of the group's sound, so there are plenty of familiar moments on the resultant album, Nimrod, but there are also new details that make the record an invigorating, if occasionally frustrating, listen. Although punk-pop is Green Day's forte, they sound the most alive on Nimrod when they're breaking away from their formula, whether it's the shuffling "Hitchin' a Ride," the bitchy, tongue-in-cheek humor of "The Grouch," the surging surf instrumental "Last Ride In," the punchy, horn-driven drag-queen saga "King for a Day," or the acoustic, string-laced ballad "Good Riddance." It's only when the trio confines itself to three chords that it sounds tired, but Billie Joe has such a gift for hooky, instantly memorable melodies that even these moments are enjoyable, if unremarkable. Still, Nimrod suffers from being simply too much -- although it clocks in at under 50 minutes, the 18 tracks whip by at such a breakneck speed that it leaves you somewhat dazed. With a little editing, Green Day's growth would have been put in sharper relief, and Nimrod would have been the triumphant leap forward it set out to be. As it stands, it's a muddled but intermittently exciting record that is full of promise. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
HI-RES€17.49
CD€14.99

Alternative & Indie - Released October 7, 2016 | Reprise

Hi-Res
HI-RES€22.49
CD€19.49

Alternative & Indie - Released October 22, 2001 | Reprise

Hi-Res
CD€20.49

Alternative & Indie - Released November 17, 2017 | Reprise

HI-RES€2.99
CD€2.29

Alternative & Indie - Released September 10, 2019 | Reprise

Hi-Res
HI-RES€17.49
CD€14.99

Alternative & Indie - Released September 29, 1995 | Reprise

Hi-Res
Dookie gave Green Day success, but it was never really clear whether they wanted it in the first place. However, given the incessantly catchy songwriting of Billie Joe, the success made sense. Green Day were traditionalists without realizing it, learning all of their tricks through secondhand records and second-generation California punk bands. They didn't change their sound in the slightest after signing to a major label, which meant that they couldn't revert back to a harsher, earlier sound as a way to shed their audience for Dookie's follow-up, Insomniac. Instead, they kept their blueprint and made it a shade darker. Throughout Insomniac, there are vague references to the band's startling multi-platinum breakthrough, but the album is hardly a stark confessional on the level of Nirvana's In Utero. It's a collection of speedy, catchy songs in the spirit of the Buzzcocks, the Jam, the Clash, and the Undertones, but played with more minor chords and less melody and recorded with a bigger, hard rock-oriented production. While nothing on the album is as immediate as "Basket Case" or "Longview," the band has gained a powerful sonic punch, which goes straight for the gut but sacrifices the raw edge they so desperately want to keep and makes the record slightly tame. Billie Joe hasn't lost much of his talent for simple, tuneful hooks, but after a series of songs that all sound pretty much the same, it becomes clear that he needs to push himself a little bit more if Green Day ever want to be something more than a good punk-pop band. As it is, they remain a good punk-pop band, and Insomniac is a good punk-pop record, but nothing more. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo