Your basket is empty

Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

From
HI-RES€20.49
CD€17.49

Alternative & Indie - Released March 3, 1998 | Reprise

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Hi-Res Audio
From
CD€16.99

Alternative & Indie - Released January 28, 1994 | Reprise

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Green Day couldn't have had a blockbuster without Nirvana, but Dookie wound up being nearly as revolutionary as Nevermind, sending a wave of imitators up the charts and setting the tone for the mainstream rock of the mid-'90s. Like Nevermind, this was accidental success, the sound of a promising underground group suddenly hitting its stride just as they got their first professional, big-budget, big-label production. Really, that's where the similarities end, since if Nirvana were indebted to the weirdness of indie rock, Green Day were straight-ahead punk revivalists through and through. They were products of the underground pop scene kept alive by such protagonists as All, yet what they really loved was the original punk, particularly such British punkers as the Jam and Buzzcocks. On their first couple records, they showed promise, but with Dookie, they delivered a record that found Billie Joe Armstrong bursting into full flower as a songwriter, spitting out melodic ravers that could have comfortably sat alongside Singles Going Steady, but infused with an ironic self-loathing popularized by Nirvana, whose clean sound on Nevermind is also emulated here. Where Nirvana had weight, Green Day are deliberately adolescent here, treating nearly everything as joke and having as much fun as snotty punkers should. They demonstrate a bit of depth with "When I Come Around," but that just varies the pace slightly, since the key to this is their flippant, infectious attitude -- something they maintain throughout the record, making Dookie a stellar piece of modern punk that many tried to emulate but nobody bettered. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
From
HI-RES€20.49
CD€17.49

Alternative & Indie - Released May 15, 2009 | Reprise

Hi-Res Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
From
HI-RES€20.49
CD€17.49

Alternative & Indie - Released March 3, 1998 | Reprise

Hi-Res Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
From
HI-RES€39.99
CD€33.99

Alternative & Indie - Released December 7, 2012 | Reprise

Hi-Res Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
From
HI-RES€20.49
CD€17.49

Alternative & Indie - Released September 25, 2012 | Reprise

Hi-Res Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
From
HI-RES€20.49
CD€17.49

Alternative & Indie - Released November 9, 2012 | Reprise

Hi-Res Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
From
HI-RES€20.49
CD€17.49

Alternative & Indie - Released December 7, 2012 | Reprise

Hi-Res Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
From
HI-RES€15.99
CD€13.49

Alternative & Indie - Released December 4, 2012 | Reprise

Hi-Res Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
From
HI-RES€17.49
CD€14.99

Alternative & Indie - Released January 28, 1994 | Reprise

Hi-Res
From
HI-RES€23.49
CD€20.49

Alternative & Indie - Released March 19, 2021 | Reprise

Hi-Res
Green Day's fourth album, Insomniac was originally released in October 1995, following on from Dookie which was released one year previously, and whose monster success (more than twenty-five million copies sold to date) could have sent more than one band off their heads. But, rather than repeating some magic formula and hoping for the same miracle, given that sales of Dookie had already passed ten million, Billie Joe Armstrong and his acolytes did the opposite and refocused, delivering a more aggressive and darker work, in a word: more punk! And the album's themes matched this idea, speaking of alienation, anxiety and drugs. Maybe the idea was also to regain credibility and win back early fans who might have been tempted to desert after Dookie appeared far too popular to be trusted. A savvy critic wrote at the time that Insomniac was to Green Day what In Utero was to Nirvana, after the global success of Nevermind. That is, a return to a darker, harder side. A return to the roots, in short. Bassist Mike Dirnt recalls: "I felt at the time that there was a real urgency to what we were doing. There was a real urgency to stake our claim and say, 'No, we belong here.' It was really important to us to make sure people knew that we weren’t just a flash in the pan..." Billie Joe Armstrong also wanted to press on without asking too many questions: "what I really wanted to do was keep working, and keep writing songs...I didn’t really stop and smell the roses". And here they are again, throwing out fourteen tracks as if they were chopping logs, with no let-up, keeping concentrated. Twenty-five years later, the intensity and concision of each song still works. The lyrics are steeped in pessimism and anger, as on Panic Song with its rather raw worldview: "a sick machine breeding a mass of shit". This track is also inspired by the panic attacks suffered by Billie Joe Armstrong due to her out-of-control anxiety... As an aside, before settling on Insomniac as an album title, Green Day would have preferred Jesus Christ Supermarket. Another aside: note the album cover and its multiple nods to the Dead Kennedys. Indeed, the title of the collage made for the cover by a one Winston Smith is God Told Me to Skin You Alive, a reference to the first words of a song by the Dead Kennedys, I Kill Children (1980). In addition, the image of the dentist used in the collage can also be found in an illustration for the Dead Kennedys' album Plastic Surgery Disasters (1982)... This edition, celebrating Insomniac's 25th anniversary, also includes eight tracks from the album taken from a concert in Prague on 26 March, 1996, showcasing the band's on-stage vigour and energy. © Yan Céh / Qobuz
From
HI-RES€23.49
CD€20.49

Alternative & Indie - Released November 17, 2017 | Reprise

Hi-Res
From
HI-RES€17.49
CD€14.99

Alternative & Indie - Released February 7, 2020 | Reprise

Hi-Res Booklet
Billie Joe Armstrong’s band is back with Father Of All Motherf***ers, a manifesto of pure rage if ever there was one. Ten tracks make up twenty-five minutes of Green Day intensity that they have not displayed for a long time. When words, actions and even protests no longer have any effect, the only response possible is to let the decibels speak instead of the fists. Catchy and unpredictable, the only thing left to do is to headbang and admit defeat during the stronger moments like during the eponymous track, or the airy Oh Yeah with its unwavering rhythm. Green Day is not only able to sing loud and fast, as proven by the poignant Junkies On A High which employs a well-used catchy melody. The closing song Graffitia is a fierce old-school frenzy which is capable of getting anyone nearby up to dance. Father Of All… (its more marketable alternative name) is the album which has the fire that was perhaps missing from a few of their latest records. It’s a real pleasure to hear the Californians regain all that rage that we were suspecting was beginning to diminish. © Maxime Archambaud/Qobuz
From
HI-RES€17.49
CD€14.99

Alternative & Indie - Released October 14, 1997 | Reprise

Hi-Res
From
CD€16.99

Alternative & Indie - Released October 14, 1997 | Reprise

From
HI-RES€17.49
CD€14.99

Alternative & Indie - Released September 29, 1995 | Reprise

Hi-Res
From
HI-RES€73.99
CD€63.99

Alternative & Indie - Released December 22, 2009 | Reprise

Hi-Res
From
HI-RES€17.49
CD€14.99

Alternative & Indie - Released September 19, 2000 | Reprise

Hi-Res
From
HI-RES€22.49
CD€19.49

Alternative & Indie - Released October 22, 2001 | Reprise

Hi-Res
From
HI-RES€17.49
CD€14.99

Alternative & Indie - Released October 7, 2016 | Reprise

Hi-Res