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Chamber Music - Released October 26, 2018 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Gramophone Editor's Choice - 5 étoiles de Classica
During the course of a full career, which justly earned him the name of "prince of baroque violinists", Giuliano Carmignola developed a remarkable vision of Bach's works for solo violin. Carmignola, a student of Szeryng and Milstein, knows this repertoire inside and out, creating a feeling of spontaneity and improvisation while remaining closely faithful to Bach's writing. He uses a discreet but present vibrato beautifully (a far cry from some other baroque musicians who step much further back from the material), and he favours a free approach to rhythm and an expressive style that highlights all the colours and subtleties of Bach's phrasing. His playing is influenced by the historical techniques unearthed by modern musicology, but it is also profoundly original, lyrical, and moving. The three Sonatas and three Partitas date back to the 1720s, the era of the great instrumental masterworks known as the Brandeburg Concertos, the First Book of the Well-Tempered Clavier and the Cello Suites. The sonatas take the form of church sonatas – four movements, slow-fast-slow-fast – and the partitas borrow from the old-style dance suites in five, six or even eight movements. © SM/Qobuz
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Classical - Released January 26, 2010 | Divox

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Classical - Released December 8, 2014 | Archiv Produktion

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or
This release of Bach's well-explored violin concertos (plus a couple of arranged keyboard concertos) by Italian violinist Giuliano Carmignola delivers truth in advertising on its back cover: the violinist, playing a 1739 Guidantus and leading the historical-instrument ensemble Concerto Köln, "seems to cast fresh light on these much-loved masterpieces by imbuing them with all the joyfulness of his Venetian sound." What this means is that Bach is taken beyond even the vigorous Italian Vivaldi sound in vogue and into hoedown territory. It is absolutely something new and different, and it's hard to imagine Bach not being a bit startled by it. The fast movements are tumultuous and pushed to the edge in terms of tempo. Reactions to them will likely be entirely individual, and listeners might end up thinking that some of the concertos are enhanced or at least refracted in new directions by this approach, but that in others a certain Apollonian quality intrinsic to Bach is lost. Give Carmignola credit on a couple of counts: as fast and furious as things get, contrapuntal clarity is never lost, and in the slow movements he pours on an intensely lyrical quality that may also be unidiomatic, but will get to listeners if they let it. Carmignola is well supported by fine studio sound from the revived Archiv label, and in general this is the kind of album that gets points for sheer audacity. © TiVo
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Classical - Released March 12, 2013 | Archiv Produktion

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
The trend in historical performances of Vivaldi's violin concertos has been to have the violinist serve as leader of the ensemble, as would likely have happened in Vivaldi's time. But Vivaldi's music, like Bach's, contains multitudes of ideas, and one way to look at the concertos, especially the late ones heard here, is to regard them as part, and indeed as a foundation, of the virtuoso tradition that grew up over the 18th century. That's the idea behind this recording, featuring violinist Giuliano Carmignola and the Accademia Bizantina under conductor Ottavio Dantone. All these musicians have recorded a good deal of Vivaldi before -- Carmignola was one of the mainstays of the Brilliant label's budget Vivaldi series -- but they produce something different as a team from what they accomplished individually. These concertos are all late works; one has never been recorded before, and two others are given in reconstructed versions. Dantone can deliver a good specimen of the high-octane way of playing Vivaldi that has become common among Italian historical-instrument groups, but here he selectively reins in the Accademia Bizantina in order to put Carmignola's exertions front and center and focus on the daring and innovative contrasts that are essential to Vivaldi's late style. And what exertions they are! In addition to the sheer speed of the finales and the presence of extravagant moments such as the three-octave scale in the cadenza used in the finale of the newly reconstructed Violin Concerto in F major, RV 283, there are such novel effect as a concerto (the Violin Concerto in D minor, RV 243) written entirely without the use of the E string. This is, in short, state-of-the-art Vivaldi, and a great deal of fun for listeners of any kind. Extra points for the fun pun in the album title. © TiVo
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Classical - Released January 1, 2009 | Archiv Produktion

Booklet Distinctions Choc de Classica
This disc of four Baroque violin concertos contains three world-premiere recordings, but they are of minimal aesthetic or historical interest. These heretofore unknown concertos by Domenico Dall'Oglio, Michele Stratico, and Pietro Nardini are no worse or better than the more familiar concerto of Antonio Lolli. The standard tricks and tropes of the late Baroque Italian violin concerto are deployed to fine effect, but only listeners fully immersed in the concertos of Locatelli, Corelli, and Vivaldi are likely to find these works more than pleasantly diverting. The performances by violinist Giuliano Carmignola are full of flash and fire, and the accompaniments by the Venice Baroque Orchestra under Andrea Marcon are poised and polished. Hearing new music can be a salutary experience, even if the new music in question is three centuries old, but general listeners are likely to find these pieces undistinguished and indistinguishable, and only specialists in the era are likely to note the qualities that make them distinct from hundreds of other late-Baroque Italian violin concertos. © TiVo
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Classical - Released March 12, 2013 | Archiv Produktion

Hi-Res Booklet
The trend in historical performances of Vivaldi's violin concertos has been to have the violinist serve as leader of the ensemble, as would likely have happened in Vivaldi's time. But Vivaldi's music, like Bach's, contains multitudes of ideas, and one way to look at the concertos, especially the late ones heard here, is to regard them as part, and indeed as a foundation, of the virtuoso tradition that grew up over the 18th century. That's the idea behind this recording, featuring violinist Giuliano Carmignola and the Accademia Bizantina under conductor Ottavio Dantone. All these musicians have recorded a good deal of Vivaldi before -- Carmignola was one of the mainstays of the Brilliant label's budget Vivaldi series -- but they produce something different as a team from what they accomplished individually. These concertos are all late works; one has never been recorded before, and two others are given in reconstructed versions. Dantone can deliver a good specimen of the high-octane way of playing Vivaldi that has become common among Italian historical-instrument groups, but here he selectively reins in the Accademia Bizantina in order to put Carmignola's exertions front and center and focus on the daring and innovative contrasts that are essential to Vivaldi's late style. And what exertions they are! In addition to the sheer speed of the finales and the presence of extravagant moments such as the three-octave scale in the cadenza used in the finale of the newly reconstructed Violin Concerto in F major, RV 283, there are such novel effect as a concerto (the Violin Concerto in D minor, RV 243) written entirely without the use of the E string. This is, in short, state-of-the-art Vivaldi, and a great deal of fun for listeners of any kind. Extra points for the fun pun in the album title. © TiVo
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Classical - Released February 8, 2005 | Archiv Produktion

Hi-Res
Recent years have brought a steady stream of recordings of Vivaldi concertos beyond the dozen or so famous ones, and it has became clear that his corpus of work remains a land of mostly unexplored riches. Consider the pair of Vivaldi works included on this Concerto veneziano, performed by violinist Giuliano Carmignola and the Venice Baroque Orchestra. Neither work sounds remotely like the Four Seasons and the other Vivaldi concertos most people are familiar with. The first movement of the Violin Concerto in E minor, RV 278, is the sort of piece Vivaldi's successor Tartini had in mind when he complained in reference to the elder master's music that "a throat isn't the neck of a violin"; it is a wordless but highly evocative little operatic scene, complete with mounting grimness and sudden chromatic shocks. The Concerto for Violin and Strings ("in due cori") in B flat major, RV 583, is a grand work with a highly virtuosic (and scordatura) violin part set against two small orchestras; annotator Roger-Claude Travers speculates that it was written for some special occasion. The slow movements of both of these works are of the unbearably beautiful sort that Vivaldi seemed to write with miraculous ease; the B flat concerto's central movement is a chaconne that begins almost minimalistically and expands into a cascade of pure ornament in the violin. Concertos by Pietro Locatelli and Giuseppe Tartini are also included. They show how the next generation of Italian virtuosi dealt with Vivaldi's example. One learns from the liner notes that Vivaldi was the first to suggest the idea of a cadenza. A massive cadenza in the Locatelli work challenges the violinist to the same degree as did Bach's sonatas for unaccompanied violin, but it has all the musical interest of a 1970s rock drum solo. Still and all, this is a must-have disc for lovers of the Baroque concerto. Carmignola and the Venice Baroque Orchestra achieve an ideal new Italian sound in the historical-performance arena, with a warmth that stands in contrast to the glittering surfaces wrought by northern European groups. One attractive feature of this release is the set of liner notes; in the U.S. version they are in English only, which allows room for enthusiastic discourse on the music itself along with detailed and entertaining performer biographies. Presumably other countries get the notes in their own languages. This approach is preferable to the packed-in small print one usually finds when translations in three or more languages are included. True, the label has to split up the production run this way, but in these days of digital graphics files, that really shouldn't be much of a problem. © TiVo

Classical - Released May 8, 2021 | UMG Recordings, Inc.

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Violin Concertos - Released September 19, 2002 | Sony Classical

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Classical - Released January 1, 1996 | Divox

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Classical - Released June 2, 2008 | Archiv Produktion

If this is the future of Mozart performance practice, the future is secure. The combination of period instrument violinist Giuliano Carmignola and modern instrument conductor Claudio Abbado leading the youthful period instrument Orchestra Mozart produces something new under the sun: a hybrid of both approaches that takes the best from both and creates something fresh and shining. Carmignola, the leader of Venice's Teatro La Fenice and one of Italy's best period violinists, has a focused tone, a lively sense of rhythm, and a wonderful feeling for line and color. Better still, he has a complete grasp of the music's style and his effortlessly elegant interpretations sound like echt Mozart. But best of all, Carmignola is partnered with Claudio Abbado. As well as supporting the soloist with kindness and understanding, the master conductor elicits playing from the Orchestra Mozart that fairly sparkles with brightness and enthusiasm, creating performances that could serve as models for years to come. Joined by ace violist Danusha Waskiewicz in the Sinfonia Concertante that fills out the second disc, this beautifully produced Deutsche Grammophon set stands tall among the vast number of recordings of the Mozart violin concertos already available. © TiVo
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Classical - Released May 4, 2018 | Preludio Srl

Classical - Released June 26, 2021 | UMG Recordings, Inc.

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Classical - Released August 22, 2014 | Sony Classical

When considering the first set of compositions designed to truly extend and test the technical limits of the violin, most would first consider the 24 Caprices of Paganini. However, more than a century before Paganini was even thought of, Italian composer Pietro Locatelli was pushing the violin to its limits with his four concertos of Opus 3, subtitled the "Art of the Violin." These works were innovative in nearly every way conceivable. Even the form of the concertos was atypical; Locatelli abandoned the traditional three-movement format and included two caprices. From a technical standpoint, the concertos stretch the range of the violin to its limit and demand bow techniques and finger dexterity simply unheard of. Of course, all of these challenges mean nothing if the works are not given musically fulfilling performances. Giuliano Carmignola provides listeners with flawless technical mastery, unblemished intonation, astonishing amounts of energy, and musically informed performances throughout this CD. Listening to the feats he pulls off on his violin is all the more amazing when considering he performs on a period Baroque instrument -- flattened fingerboard and bridge, gut strings, shortened fingerboard, and a bow that curves outward rather than inward. His sound, as well as that of the Venice Baroque Orchestra, is pristinely clear while maintaining an inviting and rich warmth. Fans of Carmignola as well as those who may be unfamiliar with him should absolutely purchase this album, sit back, and prepare to be astonished at what the violin is capable of. © TiVo
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Classical - Released January 1, 2006 | Archiv Produktion

Nobody would accuse violinist Giuliano Carmignola, harpsichordist and conductor Andrea Marcon, or the Venice Baroque Orchestra of softness or sentimentality. In this 2006 recording of five violin concertos by Vivaldi, no trace of vibrato or portamento touches their bows and even crescendos are treated as if contagious. Carmignola tears into the works with the kind of ardor most violinists reserve for Paganini, and Marcon and the Venetian orchestra treat these works as if Vivaldi's concertos were on the same aesthetic level as Bach's concertos. Unlike some period instrument ensembles, which sound as if they miss modern instruments, the Venice Baroque Orchestra sounds born to the world of flat necks and cat gut strings. These are extremely expressive performances, marked by shifts of dynamics and incandescent playing, and ultimately they could be considered among the most exciting performances of Vivaldi concertos ever recorded. Carmignola's exuberant finger glissando at the close of the C major Concerto could send a chill down your spine. Archiv's sound is crisp, clean, and colorful. © TiVo
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Violin Concertos - Released September 24, 2001 | Sony Classical

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Classical - Released November 14, 2000 | Sony Classical

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Classical - Released May 26, 2017 | Musica Viva

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Classical - Released January 1, 2004 | Divox