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Rock - Released February 5, 2013 | Rhino - Warner Records

Distinctions Album du mois Magic - The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Pitchfork: Best New Reissue
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Rock - Released February 4, 1977 | Rhino - Warner Records

Distinctions Album du mois Magic - The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Rock - Released February 4, 1977 | Rhino - Warner Records

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Rock - Released September 23, 2016 | Rhino - Warner Records

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Completing the trilogy begun by Rumours (1977) and Tusk (1979), Fleetwood Mac recorded Mirage between 1981 and 1982 at the famous Château d'Hérouville. The acoustics of the venue have been compared to Abbey Road studios and the likes of Bowie, Iggy Pop, Cat Stevens and a bunch of others have all passed through. After a hiatus where they followed their own personal ambitions, the quintet returned to the studio. In the meantime, Stevie Nicks, Mick Fleetwood and Lindsey Buckingham had set off on their solo careers. And Nicks' Bella Donna, released a year earlier, produced by Tom Petty and Jimmy Iovine, was at the top of the charts, selling 8 million copies. Enough to overshadow this Mirage... However, there was no way she was leaving Fleetwood Mac. The beautiful girl whose voice had been roughened by dope signed off on two songs: Gypsy, a nostalgic ballad which she dedicated to her friend Robyn Snider Anderson, and Straight Back. Christine McVie composed Hold Me, Love in Store, one of the hits on the opus, as well as Wish You Were Here and Only Over You. In fact, it was Buckingham, in the same vein as Tusk, who wrote most of the songs.Less experimental than Tusk but less obvious than Rumours in its melodic writing, Mirage closes Fleetwood Mac's golden period. Dominating the work, McVie's kitschy synthesizers print an antiquated eighties sound onto the intros of Can't Go Back and Oh Diane, giving the work a flaky pop varnish. It was not until Tango In The Night, five years later, that the FM sound was back. Within this Deluxe version, we find a live performance at the Los Angeles Forum in 1982 where we hear Buckingham's bluesy guitars, unpublished versions, B-sides and a cover of Fats Domino's Blue Monday. © Charlotte Saintoin/Qobuz
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Rock - Released October 12, 1979 | Rhino - Warner Records

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Rock - Released April 30, 2013 | Rhino - Warner Records

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Rock - Released September 23, 2016 | Rhino - Warner Records

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Completing the trilogy begun by Rumours (1977) and Tusk (1979), Fleetwood Mac recorded Mirage between 1981 and 1982 at the famous Château d'Hérouville. The acoustics of the venue have been compared to Abbey Road studios and the likes of Bowie, Iggy Pop, Cat Stevens and a bunch of others have all passed through. After a hiatus where they followed their own personal ambitions, the quintet returned to the studio. In the meantime, Stevie Nicks, Mick Fleetwood and Lindsey Buckingham had set off on their solo careers. And Nicks' Bella Donna, released a year earlier, produced by Tom Petty and Jimmy Iovine, was at the top of the charts, selling 8 million copies. Enough to overshadow this Mirage... However, there was no way she was leaving Fleetwood Mac. The beautiful girl whose voice had been roughened by dope signed off on two songs: Gypsy, a nostalgic ballad which she dedicated to her friend Robyn Snider Anderson, and Straight Back. Christine McVie composed Hold Me, Love in Store, one of the hits on the opus, as well as Wish You Were Here and Only Over You. In fact, it was Buckingham, in the same vein as Tusk, who wrote most of the songs.Less experimental than Tusk but less obvious than Rumours in its melodic writing, Mirage closes Fleetwood Mac's golden period. Dominating the work, McVie's kitschy synthesizers print an antiquated eighties sound onto the intros of Can't Go Back and Oh Diane, giving the work a flaky pop varnish. It was not until Tango In The Night, five years later, that the FM sound was back. Within this Deluxe version, we find a live performance at the Los Angeles Forum in 1982 where we hear Buckingham's bluesy guitars, unpublished versions, B-sides and a cover of Fats Domino's Blue Monday. © Charlotte Saintoin/Qobuz
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Rock - Released April 9, 2021 | Rhino - Warner Records

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Fleetwood Mac's 1980 double-album Live was released as a way for the physically, emotionally, and creatively exhausted group to continue the winning streak that saw them dominate the last half of the '70s with Fleetwood Mac, Rumours, and Tusk. The band recorded audio and video at every one of the 112 (!) dates they played between October 1979 and September 1980 and then proceeded to put together an album that putatively represented a Tusk tour date. In that regard, Live was perhaps the apotheosis of the Frankenstein-ed "live" album. The 2-LP set didn't just combine recordings from multiple dates on the Tusk tour ... it pulled in songs from multiple tours to present a weird, idealized version of "a Fleetwood Mac concert." The original release threw in a few cuts from the Rumours tour, a song originally released by Buckingham Nicks ("Don't Let Me Down Again") that the Mac performed on tour in 1975, and even a couple of studio rarities ("Fireflies" and a cover of the Beach Boys' "Farmer's Daughter"). However the album may fail as an accurate piece of documentary audio it more than succeeds as a cohesive piece of rock 'n' roll. While some tracks do occasionally suffer a bit from the vagaries of live performance—a cracked voice here, a late guitar melody there—thanks to the embarrassment of riches in their song pool and given that the band was at the peak of their powers, the selection of their best individual performances yielded excellent results, and nearly all of the tracks bristle with energy, vibrancy, and a sense of creative electricity that was surely a bit of a crapshoot on such a long and grueling tour. And, in some cases—"Over and Over" and "Never Going Back Again" especially—the live versions captured here are actually superior to the studio takes, gaining an intensity and immediacy that accentuates their inherent drama. This new edition continues in the original's tradition, tacking on a third disc of live rarities that's similarly wide-ranging, including tracks recorded on the Mirage tour which happened two years after Live was originally released. While those extras feel (obviously) tacked on—more than an encore, but less than a standalone show—they also lack the flowing context of the main album and feel far more disjointed in their presentation. Nonetheless, getting to hear the Rumours band take on "The Green Manalishi (With The Two-Pronged Crown)" at the Oklahoma City State Fair Arena in 1977 or a transcendent version of "Songbird" from the tail end of the Tusk tour in Arkansas is still quite thrilling. © Jason Ferguson/Qobuz
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Rock - Released January 19, 2018 | Rhino - Warner Records

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Rock - Released July 11, 1975 | Rhino - Warner Records

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Rock - Released March 31, 2017 | Rhino - Warner Records

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Rock - Released April 14, 1987 | Rhino - Warner Records

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Rock - Released December 4, 2015 | Rhino - Warner Records

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Rock - Released December 4, 2015 | Rhino - Warner Records

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Rock - Released September 19, 1969 | Rhino - Warner Records

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Rock - Released April 13, 1987 | Rhino - Warner Records

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Pop - Released November 21, 1988 | Warner Records

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Rock - Released October 12, 2002 | Rhino - Warner Records

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Rock - Released September 6, 2019 | Sony Music CG

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Before The Beginning? Before taking over the sound waves with its most popular combination (with the presence of Lindsey Buckingham, Stevie Nicks and Christine McVie) Fleetwood Mac already existed in 1968. Risen from the ashes of the Bluesbreakers, this version of the band, created by the brilliant Peter Green (with two other guitarists, Jeremy Spencer and a very young Danny Kirwan, Mick Fleetwood on drums and John McVie on the bass), took inspiration from the Delta blues by covering some of its legendary icons: Robert Johnson, Elmore James, T-Bone Walker… In three discs, Sony has uncovered thirty live rarely heard versions from 1968 to 1970 -- including four demos. These tracks are phenomenal, unlabelled and therefore entirely appraised and approved by their creators, who present a vision of contrasts over the course of the record. It begins in 1968 with lively but consistent guitars, before a more wandering feeling to the music in 1970, with Green’s signature extended instrumental sections, like the vibrant 13-minute-long Rattlesnake Shake, the fierce Oh Well or the languid tones of the famous Albatross, all in more rough-around-the-edges versions. Sadly, Spencer would go on to join the Children of God, Kirwan would be thrown out due to his alcohol dependency and Peter Green’s genius slowly evolved into madness. This is a real piece of British musical history. © Charlotte Saintoin/Qobuz
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Pop - Released August 19, 1997 | Warner Records

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Fleetwood Mac in the magazine