Your basket is empty

Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

From
HI-RES€21.49
CD€14.99

Classical - Released June 26, 2007 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
From
CD€13.99

Classical - Released January 1, 1981 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
From
CD€24.99

Classical - Released March 15, 1999 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
From
CD€9.99

Classical - Released June 26, 2007 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
From
CD€6.99

Solo Piano - Released February 23, 2017 | Les Indispensables de Diapason

Distinctions Diapason d'or
From
CD€14.99

Classical - Released August 19, 2016 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
In the early 1960s, with the first wave of Russian virtuosi continuing to make waves in the West, extraordinary recitals spread beyond the usual American concert centers of New York and Boston. This recording reproduces an Emil Gilels concert given in Seattle in December of 1964, and it captures the pianist's tremendous energy and the energy of the audience's response as well. The Beethoven Piano Sonata No. 21 in C major, Op. 53 ("Waldstein") was one of Gilels' trademarks. You might want this release just for the performance of that work alone, with its surging double-octave scales in the finale letting the audience know that it's in for something special. There are many other highlights: Prokofiev that seems perfectly idiomatic, a stirring "Danse Russe" of Stravinsky (another Gilels trademark), a group of Debussy's Images that is hardly conventional, but seems inexorably swept along by the whirlwind of the whole. Everything comes to rest with an Alexander Siloti arrangement of a Bach prelude. Gilels in the 1960s was not quite the household name that Sviatoslav Richter was, but, admired by Rachmaninov and directly connected to Prokofiev, he perhaps represented pure Russian tradition in a way that no other pianist of his time did. This Deutsche Grammophon release gives a good idea of his accomplishments. The sound certainly isn't spectacular, but for 1964 its immediacy and clarity are reasonable. © TiVo
From
CD€9.99

Classical - Released March 26, 2013 | SWR Classic

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
From
CD€48.99

Classical - Released January 1, 1996 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Every man's death diminishes us all, but the death of a man so close to completing his greatest achievement and the summation of his life's work diminishes us all greatly -- very, very greatly. When Emil Gilels died in 1985, he had completed recordings of most but not all of Beethoven's piano sonatas, released here in a nine-disc set. What's here is unimaginably good: superlative recordings of 27 of the 32 canonical sonatas, including the "Pathétique," "Moonlight," "Waldstein," "Appassionata," "Les Adieux," and the majestic "Hammerklavier," plus the two early "Electoral" Sonatas and the mighty Eroica Variations. What's missing is unimaginably priceless: five of the canonical sonatas, including the first and -- horror vacui -- the last. But still, for what there is, we must be grateful. Beyond all argument one of the great pianists of the twentieth century, Gilels the Soviet super virtuoso had slowly mellowed and ripened over his long career, and when he began recording the sonatas in 1972, his interpretations had matured and deepened while his superlative technique remained gloriously intact straight through to the last recordings of his final year. In performance after performance, one marvels at Gilels' virtuosity, his expressivity, and his sheer joy in music-making. But most of all, it is through the intensity of Gilels' interpretations, in the way he finds the depths of the Largos and reaches the heights of the Allegro vivaces, in the way he seems to so thoroughly understand and completely identify with Beethoven's music, that we understand it in a new and better way ourselves. While obviously not the only Beethoven piano sonata set one should have on the shelf, any Beethoven collection without Gilels is a poorer Beethoven collection. From high stereo to early digital, Deutsche Grammophon's sound is consistently translucent. © TiVo
From
HI-RES€17.49
CD€12.49

Classical - Released March 15, 1999 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet
From
HI-RES€21.49
CD€14.99

Classical - Released January 1, 1976 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet
From
CD€35.99

Classical - Released August 21, 2020 | Profil

Booklet
From
CD€14.99

Classical - Released January 1, 2010 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

From
CD€13.99

Classical - Released January 1, 1986 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

From
CD€16.99

Classical - Released January 1, 1970 | Warner Classics

From
CD€9.99

Classical - Released January 1, 1987 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

From
CD€9.99

Concertos - Released February 16, 1975 | Warner Classics

From
CD€9.99

Classical - Released January 1, 2001 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

From
CD€21.99

Classical - Released January 1, 2006 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Booklet
From
CD€27.99

Classical - Released August 9, 2010 | Warner Classics

From
CD€9.99

Classical - Released January 1, 1999 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)