Your basket is empty

Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

From
HI-RES€16.99
CD€14.49

Rock - Released November 13, 2015 | Epic - Legacy

Hi-Res
From
HI-RES€11.39
CD€9.99

Rock - Released September 1, 1976 | Epic - Legacy

Hi-Res
From
HI-RES€11.39
CD€9.99

Rock - Released May 31, 1979 | Epic - Legacy

Hi-Res
From
HI-RES€16.99
CD€11.49

Rock - Released September 1, 1974 | Epic - Legacy

Hi-Res
This is the album where Jeff Lynne finally found the sound he'd wanted since co-founding Electric Light Orchestra three years earlier. Up to this point, most of the group's music had been self-contained -- Lynne, Richard Tandy, et al., providing whatever was needed, vocally or instrumentally, even if it meant overdubbing their work layer upon layer. Lynne saw the limitations of this process, however, and opted for the presence of an orchestra -- it was only 30 pieces, but the result was a much richer musical palette than the group had ever had to work with, and their most ambitious and successful record up to that time. Indeed, Eldorado was strongly reminiscent in some ways of Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band. Not that it could ever have the same impact or be as distinctive, but it had its feet planted in so many richly melodic and varied musical traditions, yet made it all work in a rock context, that it did recall the Beatles classic. It was a very romantic work, especially on the opening "Eldorado Overture," which was steeped in a wistful 1920s/1930s notion of popular fantasy (embodied in movies and novels like James Hilton's Lost Horizon and Somerset Maugham's The Razor's Edge) about disillusioned seekers. It boasted Lynne's best single up to that time, "Can't Get It Out of My Head," which most radio listeners could never get out of their respective heads, either. The integration of the orchestra would become even more thorough on future albums, but Eldorado was notable for mixing the band and orchestra (and a choir) in ways that did no violence to the best elements of both. © Bruce Eder /TiVo
From
HI-RES€16.99
CD€11.49

Rock - Released August 1, 1981 | Epic - Legacy

Hi-Res
Time takes its cues more from such bands as the Alan Parsons Project and Wings than from Jeff Lynne's fascination with Pepper-era Beatles. Sure, all the electronic whirrs and bleeps are present and accounted for, and Time did spawn hit singles in "Hold on Tight" and "Twilight," but on the average, ELO had begun to get too stuck on the same structure and content of their releases. "The Way Life's Meant to Be" echoes very early ELO hits like "Can't Get It Out of My Head," and the "Prologue" and "Epilogue" segments try and bring about a unifying concept that doesn't quite hold up upon listening all the way through. Time proves to be competent ELO but not great ELO. © James Chrispell /TiVo
From
CD€14.49

Pop - Released January 1, 1987 | Epic - Legacy

Epic/Legacy's 2005 release All Over the World: The Very Best of Electric Light Orchestra is the latest installment in the seemingly endless series of ELO comps. Since it follows 2003's handy single-disc The Essential Electric Light Orchestra by merely two years, it's easy to wonder what distinguishes this from the other ELO collections on the market, and whether it was necessary to release another single-disc set so quickly after the last. The biggest differences between All Over the World and Essential is that the 2005 release has some very nice but altogether too brief liner notes from Jeff Lynne along with five more tracks than the 15-track 2003 release. That doesn't necessarily mean that it's a better album, however. While it does contain the terrific "Showdown," which was missing from Essential, All Over the World is inexplicably missing ELO's first American Top Ten single, "Can't Get It out of My Head," along with such other key tracks as "Do Ya," "Calling America," "Roll Over Beethoven," "10538 Overture," and "Boy Blue." Although the presence of "Xanadu" and such album tracks as "The Diary of Horace Wimp" make up for some of these absences, there are too many good songs missing to make this a pick over Essential, which has a higher ratio of hits. That said, All Over the World has most of the big songs -- "Mr. Blue Sky," "Evil Woman," "Don't Bring Me Down," "Sweet Talkin' Woman," "Turn to Stone," "Hold on Tight," "Livin' Thing," "Ma-Ma-Ma Belle," "Strange Magic," and "Rock and Roll Is King" among them -- and it's a good listen, so most casual fans won't be disappointed if this is the only ELO disc they own (although they will sorely miss "Can't Get It out of My Head"). But if you're just about to pick up one ELO disc, get Essential or, better still, 1995's double-disc Strange Magic instead, since they both are tighter, better listens than this and have more of the major hits. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
From
HI-RES€11.39
CD€9.99

Rock - Released October 1, 1975 | Epic - Legacy

Hi-Res
From
CD€14.49

Rock - Released September 10, 2012 | Columbia - Legacy

Tempting as it may be, it's not quite accurate to call Jeff Lynne the rock & roll George Lucas, a technophile who can't resist tweaking his famous older work to bring it up to modern standards. Unlike Lucas, Lynne doesn't paint over his original work, turning it into something vaguely reminiscent of the past: with Mr. Blue Sky: The Very Best of Electric Light Orchestra, he simply re-creates his old arrangements with new technology. There are no reinterpretations of these ten hits -- 12 on the bonus edition, with "10538 Overture" and "Point of No Return" added to the collection -- Lynne has simply set out to re-record the originals so they sound brighter, clearer, and a shade bigger. And he's succeeded. If you're listening casually, it can be pretty easy to mistake these for the originals. Lynne's voice is in good shape, the harmonies are layered precisely, he's replicated old-fashioned analog synths and lifted compression, so Mr. Blue Sky simply feels clean and renewed, the familiar contours buffed so they sparkle. Whether this is enough for fans to trade in their original ELO hits album in favor of this crisp new model is simply a matter of taste -- many may prefer the heavily compressed analog originals, as that's what they grew up with; after a quiet decade, hardcore fans will certainly treasure any new Lynne music, even if it is merely a revival -- but this is by no means an embarrassing stroll down memory lane. It can be quite fun, actually, even if it is somewhat baffling. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
From
HI-RES€37.49
CD€31.99

Rock - Released November 17, 2017 | Columbia

Hi-Res
Jeff Lynne revived Electric Light Orchestra in 2015 -- due to legal reasons, they were now called Jeff Lynne's ELO -- releasing a comeback album called Alone in the Universe and steadily mounting a return to the road. Several dates happened in 2016, but the tour reached its apex in June 2017, when the group played in front of 60,000 people at London's Wembley Stadium. Released five months after that June 24 gig, Wembley or Bust -- which was accompanied by a concert film -- features the entirety of the gig, and if it's not heard too closely, it could sometimes be mistaken for an ELO greatest-hits album. Lynne re-creates the arrangements of his studio work throughout the concert; even when the Traveling Wilburys' "Handle with Care" is hauled out, it sounds like it did on record. The vocals are where the seams show, as Lynne is a little rougher and lower than he was at his peak. Although this is a noticeable difference, it's hardly enough to mar what amounts to a thoroughly enjoyable -- and perhaps a tad triumphant -- return to live performance for Jeff Lynne. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
From
CD€15.99

Progressive Rock - Released October 7, 2011 | Epic

From
HI-RES€16.99
CD€14.49

Rock - Released August 3, 2018 | Epic - Legacy

Hi-Res
35 years later, this new re-edition finally corrects a terrible injustice. Despite its colossal success at the end of the 1970s, the powerful major distributing ELO in the United States vetoed the double-album project, forcing Jeff Lynne – who had become the band’s uncontested leader −, to change his strategy and tame his ambitions, settling for a reasonably long simple album. Professionals in the business had strong doubts over whether or not this veteran of the 70s could survive the 80s, a decade in which pop music lost all dignity. In other words, he who was one of the few to come close to the Beatles’ excellence and knew how to adapt, with more or less finesse, to the zeitgeist, particularly the disco wave, was in danger of becoming old fashioned… Still, his two previous albums, Discovery (1979) and the ambitious Time (1981) both topped the charts in many countries, as well as his original soundtrack for the disappointing film Xanadu.Listening to the 17 tracks of this revised and corrected version of Secret Messages, it becomes clear that Lynne’s updating work should have earned him more respect. Retaining its idiosyncratic components that allowed for rock’n’roll influences to harmoniously coexist with pronounced classical influences, ELO broadened their skill set while mastering the latest progress in technology. Tracks that had been scattered over singles, compilations, or the following album (Balance Of Power) have finally been re-integrated, with, as a bonus, a handful of previously unreleased songs that are well worth a listen. Only Beatles Forever is missing, the tribute Lynne still doesn’t deign to officially release, despite achieving his dream by producing the Liverpool band during their Anthology period, after collaborating with two of its members (George Harrison and Ringo Starr). © Jean-Pierre Sabouret/Qobuz
From
HI-RES€16.99
CD€14.49

Rock - Released November 1, 2019 | Columbia

Hi-Res
From
HI-RES€11.39
CD€9.99

Rock - Released November 1, 1973 | Epic - Legacy

Hi-Res
From
HI-RES€19.99
CD€17.49

Rock - Released November 13, 2015 | Columbia

Hi-Res
From
CD€14.49

Pop/Rock - Released June 1, 1980 | Epic

From
HI-RES€10.49
CD€7.49

Rock - Released February 17, 1986 | Epic - Legacy

Hi-Res
From
CD€19.99

Rock - Released December 18, 2000 | Epic - Legacy

The very fact that Electric Light Orchestra released a second three-disc box set is a tacit admission that, yes, 1987's Afterglow wasn't everything it should be. Happily, 2000's Flashback is. Assembled with the cooperation of Jeff Lynne, Flashback covers all the bases, featuring all the hits, a good selection of album tracks, and seven previously unreleased tracks, two alternate mixes and "After All," previously unavailable on CD. The sequencing is roughly chronological, with each of the three discs spotlighting a different era, then sequenced for maximum listenability within that -- so "10538 Overture" segues to "Showdown" and "Ma-Ma-Ma Belle" then doubles back to the first album. It's a gambit that works, since Flashback winds up flowing as gracefully as ELO's best albums. And, make no mistake, this is one of their best albums, a rare box set that satisfies the needs of both casual and mildly dedicated fans, while offering the hardcore not just a bunch of rarities but an enjoyable album with its own character. So, it trumps Afterglow in every possible way, then, and thereby eliminates the need for yet another three-disc ELO box. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
From
CD€14.49

Rock - Released June 12, 2001 | Columbia - Legacy

Fifteen years after Jeff Lynne masterminded the last official Electric Light Orchestra album, and ten after his solo debut, Lynne recorded Zoom -- an ELO album that he recorded nearly entirely by himself. So why isn't this a solo album? Well, not only does Lynne own the ELO name, so he can do whatever he wants, but he designed this to be a return to the classic ELO sound. Which it is, more so than any album since the early '80s. There are lush, heartbreaking ballads and '50s-styled rockers with an endearingly robotic pulse and Beatlesque harmonies. Better than that, the songwriting is melodic and memorable, the strongest Lynne has done in decades, resulting in the most consistent record released under the ELO banner since Discovery. On top of that, the production, while clearly not a product of the '70s, avoids all the pitfalls of modern record production, sounding warm, welcoming, and right. So, why was Zoom largely ignored upon its release in the summer of 2001? Probably because no matter how good it is, there weren't a lot of listeners clamoring for a new ELO album, and even some dedicated fans may have wondered if they needed a new ELO record, since, for all its strengths, Zoom doesn't deliver any knockout punches, even on the level of "Calling American" or "Four Little Diamonds." Without a great lead single (and, even if there had been, there wouldn't have been any place for it to receive airplay), there was nothing to bring the doubters into the fold, so they couldn't discover that Zoom was a very good ELO album, certainly more than just an album for the true believers -- which is what it wound up being. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
From
HI-RES€17.49
CD€14.99

Pop - Released September 1, 2014 | Parlophone UK

Hi-Res
From
CD€14.49

Rock - Released April 22, 2013 | Columbia