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Metal - Released October 2, 2020 | Napalm Records

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The official follow-up to 2016's insidious Trust No One -- the 2018 covers LP Outlaws 'til the End, Vol. 1 paid tribute to the band's country heroes -- Dealing With Demons I is the initial installment of an ambitious double album from the veteran Santa Barbara-based melodic death metallers. The exorcism begins with "Keep Away from Me," which sees frontman Dez Fafara confronting a lifetime of agoraphobia via a Molotov cocktail of djenty string bends, punitive blast beats, and funereal ambiance. The blazing ghost story "Iona" unspools in intricate patterns that harbor moments of dark, melodic grandeur, while the mosh-worthy title track plays to all of the group's strengths, administering wave after wave of terraforming grooves that leave behind nothing but pestilence in their wake. Closer "Scars Me Forever" presents itself as a ballad, but like everything that came before it -- including the slow-churning "You Give Me a Reason to Drink," a collaboration with Fafara's son Simon Blade -- eventually settles into a punishing cadence that marries melody and might with the kind of precision that can only come from years spent studying the dark sonic arts. The unrelenting Dealing with Demons bears all of the hallmarks of its predecessors, including cover art that belongs on the side of the world's most sinister boogie van, but it aims for catharsis instead of apoplexy. © James Christopher Monger /TiVo
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Rock - Released June 14, 2007 | Echo

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When DevilDriver first started out, some assumed the band was merely a side project for everyone's favorite facially tattooed frontman, Coal Chamber's Dez Fafara. But by the group's third release, 2007's The Last Kind Words, it appeared as though Fafara has completely put the nu-metal shtick of his former band behind him -- the group is a 100 percent metallic beast that has more in common with thrash/extreme metal than all those unbearable "eyeliner metal bands." The group is just as heavy and brutal as the average band you'd spot while scanning Headbanger's Ball, as evidenced by such toe-tapping ditties as "Not All Who Wander Are Lost" and "Bound by the Moon." But therein lies the problem (the same exact dilemma that befalls many a modern metal band of the early 21st century) -- there's not anything all that much different going on here when compared to all the other acts from the current metal crop. Nothing fancy -- just an extreme metal roar that hits you right between the eyes, which may have been DevilDriver's goal all along. © Greg Prato /TiVo
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Rock - Released October 20, 2003 | Echo

Dez Fafara's post-Coal Chamber existence begins promisingly enough with "Nothing's Wrong," the leadoff track to DevilDriver's eponymous debut. His bellow is appropriately menacing, the twin guitars stutter and roar, and drummer John Boecklin bashes out a hyperkinetic drumbeat. It seems a bit overdone, but still genuine enough for enjoyment (or wall punching). However, this changes with the album's second track and single, "I Could Care Less." While its verses ring true, the song's chorus and twisting main guitar hook seem lifted from one or another of the post-grunge howlers who make a living crying about a paucity of childhood hugs. Does a hard band such as DevilDriver need to concern itself with such nods to accessibility? From its witchy moniker and the black arts runes oozing from the liner notes, it would seem Dez and his minions would rather devour their blustery competition, and wash them down with a fine Chianti. Instead, DevilDriver is marred by an intangible sense of methodical assembly. "Cry for Me Sky (Eulogy of the Scorned)" and "What Does It Take (To Be a Man)" seem to break down into distinct units -- the grandiose lyrics, the animalistic bleats, the monolithic guitar chords splintered by traditionalist peels and squeals. The bits and pieces have resonance, but they're rarely able to unite in a menacing or even very affecting way. Fortunately, there's the modernized death metal churn of "Die (And Die Now)" and "Swinging the Dead," and frequently unchecked tenets of thrash that keep the record moving fast and loose. These elements help to redeem DevilDriver's debut and suggest that, with less of an eye on the mainstream and more musings on what the idol Baphomet might contribute as a coordinating producer, the band's next trick could be magnificently horrifying. © Johnny Loftus /TiVo
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Rock - Released June 20, 2005 | Echo

Its nods to post-grunge melodic accessibility and generally workmanlike sound hurt DevilDriver's 2003 debut, and the murkiness of frontman Dez Fafara's relationship with his previous group Coal Chamber didn't necessarily help. There was promise amidst DevilDriver's riffs and runs, but harnessing it was the problem. 2005's Fury of Our Maker's Hand is the solution. DevilDriver has amplified every facet of their sound. They've turned their backs on the kind of plodding melodic obviousness that kills credibility on the raging metal side, instead hardwiring a vicious catchiness right into the guitar lines and Fafara's esophageal grind. Drummer John Boecklin slays on "Bear Witness Unto" and in the furious time-shifts of opener "End of the Line"; actually, Boecklin pretty much slays throughout Fury. "Grinf**cked," besides having the best name on the record, also exemplifies DevilDriver's union of black melody to razor-sharp playing. "Pale Horse Apocalypse" is a traditionalist thrash workout, and "Before the Hangman's Noose" approaches the hard-tack American metal of Lamb of God. The slower pace, spiritualism, and double bass tussles of "Sin & Sacrifice" seem like a tribute to European metal. Fury of Our Maker's Hand is such a severe turn away from the falter of their first album -- and a turn toward something hungry, focused, and ready to be devoured by metal faithful everywhere -- that DevilDriver may have made their true debut the second time around. © Johnny Loftus /TiVo
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Metal - Released June 20, 2005 | Echo

Its nods to post-grunge melodic accessibility and generally workmanlike sound hurt DevilDriver's 2003 debut, and the murkiness of frontman Dez Fafara's relationship with his previous group Coal Chamber didn't necessarily help. There was promise amidst DevilDriver's riffs and runs, but harnessing it was the problem. 2005's Fury of Our Maker's Hand is the solution. DevilDriver has amplified every facet of their sound. They've turned their backs on the kind of plodding melodic obviousness that kills credibility on the raging metal side, instead hardwiring a vicious catchiness right into the guitar lines and Fafara's esophageal grind. Drummer John Boecklin slays on "Bear Witness Unto" and in the furious time-shifts of opener "End of the Line"; actually, Boecklin pretty much slays throughout Fury. "Grinf**cked," besides having the best name on the record, also exemplifies DevilDriver's union of black melody to razor-sharp playing. "Pale Horse Apocalypse" is a traditionalist thrash workout, and "Before the Hangman's Noose" approaches the hard-tack American metal of Lamb of God. The slower pace, spiritualism, and double bass tussles of "Sin & Sacrifice" seem like a tribute to European metal. Fury of Our Maker's Hand is such a severe turn away from the falter of their first album -- and a turn toward something hungry, focused, and ready to be devoured by metal faithful everywhere -- that DevilDriver may have made their true debut the second time around. © Johnny Loftus /TiVo
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Metal - Released August 23, 2013 | Napalm Records Handels GmbH

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Metal - Released February 18, 2011 | Echo

Although he was once the leader of makeup-wearing nu metallists Coal Chamber, singer/screamer Dez Fafara has opted to keep things 100 percent aggro/extreme metal with DevilDriver, a band that reached its fifth release overall with 2011's Beast. DevilDriver's roster consists mainly of dudes with long stringy hair, manly-man facial hair, and tattoos -- and, unsurprisingly, the group's music goes hand in hand with its look throughout Beast, as the album is a nonstop barrage of screaming, growling, riffing, and rat-a-tat-tat drumming. And the song titles certainly reflect the ferociousness of the music, as exemplified by "Bring the Fight (To the Floor)," "Hardened," "Shitlist," "You Make Me Sick," and "Talons Out (Teeth Sharpened)." You can't fault DevilDriver's commitment to staying true to extreme metal, and refusing to budge an inch. But as is the case with many other extreme metal bands, it is only a matter of time until monotony starts to rear its ugly head -- how far can you push the heavy factor before things start to tread on "same-sounding" territory? And to a certain degree, DevilDriver fall victim to this. That said, there are moments when a few different "shades" of heavy are detected, including the beginning of the aforementioned "Shitlist" and the album-closer, "Lend Myself to the Night." However, for those who like excuse-free metal cranked to ten from beginning to end, DevilDriver have assembled one gnarly Beast for you. © Greg Prato /TiVo
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Metal - Released July 6, 2018 | Napalm Records

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Metal - Released February 18, 2011 | Echo

Although he was once the leader of makeup-wearing nu metallists Coal Chamber, singer/screamer Dez Fafara has opted to keep things 100 percent aggro/extreme metal with DevilDriver, a band that reached its fifth release overall with 2011's Beast. DevilDriver's roster consists mainly of dudes with long stringy hair, manly-man facial hair, and tattoos -- and, unsurprisingly, the group's music goes hand in hand with its look throughout Beast, as the album is a nonstop barrage of screaming, growling, riffing, and rat-a-tat-tat drumming. And the song titles certainly reflect the ferociousness of the music, as exemplified by "Bring the Fight (To the Floor)," "Hardened," "Shitlist," "You Make Me Sick," and "Talons Out (Teeth Sharpened)." You can't fault DevilDriver's commitment to staying true to extreme metal, and refusing to budge an inch. But as is the case with many other extreme metal bands, it is only a matter of time until monotony starts to rear its ugly head -- how far can you push the heavy factor before things start to tread on "same-sounding" territory? And to a certain degree, DevilDriver fall victim to this. That said, there are moments when a few different "shades" of heavy are detected, including the beginning of the aforementioned "Shitlist" and the album-closer, "Lend Myself to the Night." However, for those who like excuse-free metal cranked to ten from beginning to end, DevilDriver have assembled one gnarly Beast for you. © Greg Prato /TiVo
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Metal - Released January 1, 2007 | Echo

It seems like with each successive release, DevilDriver keep turning up the dial of heaviness. And on their fourth studio album overall, 2009's Pray for Villains, the group continues plowing forward with this approach. Screams, growls, raging riffs, and impressively airtight drumming are all crucial ingredients to the DevilDriver metallic recipe. Produced by former Machine Head guitarist Logan Mader, Pray for Villains hits you like a ton of bricks from the get-go with the album-opening title track (and leadoff single) and never lets up, as evidenced by such brutal tracks as "Fate Stepped In" and "Forgiveness Is a Six Gun," among other dangerous ditties. Pray for Villains confirms once and for all that Dez Fafara has totally shed the nu-metal schtick of Coal Chamber for the 100 percent pure headbanging fury of DevilDriver. © Greg Prato /TiVo
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Metal - Released May 13, 2016 | Napalm Records

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Metal - Released May 21, 2020 | Napalm Records

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Metal - Released August 26, 2013 | Napalm Records

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Metal - Released July 1, 2020 | Napalm Records

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Rock - Released October 31, 2006 | Echo

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Metal - Released May 22, 2009 | Echo

It seems like with each successive release, DevilDriver keep turning up the dial of heaviness. And on their fourth studio album overall, 2009's Pray for Villains, the group continues plowing forward with this approach. Screams, growls, raging riffs, and impressively airtight drumming are all crucial ingredients to the DevilDriver metallic recipe. Produced by former Machine Head guitarist Logan Mader, Pray for Villains hits you like a ton of bricks from the get-go with the album-opening title track (and leadoff single) and never lets up, as evidenced by such brutal tracks as "Fate Stepped In" and "Forgiveness Is a Six Gun," among other dangerous ditties. Pray for Villains confirms once and for all that Dez Fafara has totally shed the nu-metal schtick of Coal Chamber for the 100 percent pure headbanging fury of DevilDriver. © Greg Prato /TiVo
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Metal - Released June 8, 2018 | Napalm Records Handels GmbH

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Metal - Released April 27, 2018 | Napalm Records

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Metal - Released August 13, 2020 | Napalm Records

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Metal - Released September 24, 2020 | Napalm Records

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