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Pop - Released January 1, 1999 | Universal-Island Records Ltd.

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
dEUS continues to bring out its best and then some on The Ideal Crash, which in many ways might be the group's best all-around effort yet. That makes it a further pity it didn't get an American release, relegating the quintet further into the realms of cult appreciation stateside -- an undeserved fate for a band that has so clearly worked well with its sources of inspiration there. If anything, though, dEUS has moved into the realms of removed elegance on The Ideal Crash -- the aggressive push mixed with nightclub shadows of the past turned into a strange, calming dream at many points. Consider "One Advice, Space," whose trippy keyboard whines and drones layer over the core song to create an unsettled murk, suddenly broken by the subtle shift to strings and sweetly layered vocals on the chorus. The gentle descending chime of "The Magic Hour" and the banjo and string-tinged slow building brawl "Instant Street" further capture the mood of seemingly relaxed intensity. David Bottrill's production is a secret element in the success of The Ideal Crash, his skilled ears helping to really bring out the sly but strong tension in so many of the band's songs. Opening number "Put the Freaks Up Front" in particular, shifting fluidly as it does into a mélange of motorik-inspired rhythm trance and dark lounge jazz horns, with Barman's vocals and the overall results suggesting what Nirvana might have tried in another lifetime and a wider range to work with, sets a high bar at the start, even if much of the album works in lower-key ways. Nods subtle and otherwise to bands like Portishead (whose "Mysterons" seems to have suggested the start to "Sister Dew") give further evidence of a band that keeps its ears open while still retaining its own counsel on what to finally sound like. © Ned Raggett /TiVo
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Rock - Released November 24, 2014 | Play It Again Sam

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Alternative & Indie - Released June 1, 2012 | Play It Again Sam

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Pop - Released January 1, 1996 | Universal-Island Records Ltd.

Producing the opening track "I Don't Mind Whatever Happens" to sound like a scratchy blues track from 1930 may well be the little joke of either the band or producer Eric Drew Feldman in homage to his former boss Captain Beefheart. The results work pretty well anyway, though, and that characterizes the same "try it, let's see what happens" spirit through In a Bar. Having established its own sense of savvy white boy urban blues on Worst Case Scenario, the band explores more ways around it on its second effort, generally favoring a quieter, calmer result throughout. New guitarist Craig Ward fits into the lineup well, business carrying along as usual in its striking way. Feldman proves to be an excellent guy to have behind the boards; whether it's he or the band who figures out some of the fantastic stop on a dime shifts and arrangements throughout, all work together with great results. Clever sampling once again crops up: Mingus' "Far Wells, Mill Valley" gets a nod on the smoky snarl "Theme From Turnpike." "Fell Off the Floor, Man" is another high-point, so accomplished and sly in its genre shifting and moods that Beck could be envious. Scott McCloud of Girls Against Boys, a perfectly appropriate guest, takes a bow with some spoken word philosophy, but it's the band's blend of low, spoken vocals, weird harmonies, and sudden shifts between tight rhythms and slabs of feedback that make it all work. Another American takes a bow as well -- Dana Colley, saxophonist for Morphine, on the brief "Supermarketsong" -- but mostly it's all dEUS proving that Belgians can indeed rock. Whether it's the gentle strum and swing (then much more intense break) of "Little Arithmetics," the Built to Spill five years before its time pace and delivery of "Gimme the Heat," or the lovely piano-into-guitar anthem "Disappointed in the Sun," In a Bar is worth the finding. © Ned Raggett /TiVo
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Rock - Released April 21, 2008 | [PIAS] Cooperative

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Pop - Released January 1, 2009 | Universal Music S.A.

About the only thing wrong with dEUS' full-length debut is that the band put its best foot forward right at the start with the great "Suds & Soda." A tense, energetic rip with Klaas Janzoons' violin the final touch that sends everything over the top, it has all the wired energy of early-'90s rock, but with its own arty edge. The only thing quite like it might have been PJ Harvey's early efforts, but with more feedback throughout the mix and a fine organ break. From that great start, the five-piece spent its time exploring its own interesting rock zone, referencing back to classic rock influences and jazz pioneers as much as any of its many frazzled contemporaries. It's a bit facile to say that if Tom Waits were a young guy in 1992 he might have formed this band, but there's something agreeably impassioned and rough about Worst Case Scenario which calls to mind Waits' own avant- garage jazz efforts in the mid-'80s. Having songs that sample Frank Zappa ("Little Umbrellas," surfacing in the slow burn of the title track) and Don Cherry gives an idea of both the members' backgrounds, and the desire to see what to do with them rather than simply be reverential. Tom Barman's singing hits both loud, full-bodied shrieks, and low-and-slow as needed, while the band in general strike a great balance between straight-ahead performance and subtle studio trickery, especially courtesy of percussionist Julle De Borgher, playing everything from drums to "gas heating." When the quintet turns in a sassy, snarling performance, as on "Morticiachair," it's not too hard to see them as European cousins of Girls Against Boys or even Rocket From the Crypt. Alternately, for songs like the "Right as Rain," dEUS become the best late-night, last-drink band out there, while the building crunch of "Hotellounge" finds them able to combine the two extremes just so. © Ned Raggett /TiVo
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Pop - Released January 1, 1994 | Universal-Island Records Ltd.

About the only thing wrong with dEUS' full-length debut is that the band put its best foot forward right at the start with the great "Suds & Soda." A tense, energetic rip with Klaas Janzoons' violin the final touch that sends everything over the top, it has all the wired energy of early-'90s rock, but with its own arty edge. The only thing quite like it might have been PJ Harvey's early efforts, but with more feedback throughout the mix and a fine organ break. From that great start, the five-piece spent its time exploring its own interesting rock zone, referencing back to classic rock influences and jazz pioneers as much as any of its many frazzled contemporaries. It's a bit facile to say that if Tom Waits were a young guy in 1992 he might have formed this band, but there's something agreeably impassioned and rough about Worst Case Scenario which calls to mind Waits' own avant- garage jazz efforts in the mid-'80s. Having songs that sample Frank Zappa ("Little Umbrellas," surfacing in the slow burn of the title track) and Don Cherry gives an idea of both the members' backgrounds, and the desire to see what to do with them rather than simply be reverential. Tom Barman's singing hits both loud, full-bodied shrieks, and low-and-slow as needed, while the band in general strike a great balance between straight-ahead performance and subtle studio trickery, especially courtesy of percussionist Julle De Borgher, playing everything from drums to "gas heating." When the quintet turns in a sassy, snarling performance, as on "Morticiachair," it's not too hard to see them as European cousins of Girls Against Boys or even Rocket From the Crypt. Alternately, for songs like the "Right as Rain," dEUS become the best late-night, last-drink band out there, while the building crunch of "Hotellounge" finds them able to combine the two extremes just so. © Ned Raggett /TiVo
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Rock - Released November 18, 2016 | Universal Music Division Island Def Jam

Belgian outfit dEUS debuted in the mid-'90s as a spiky aggregate of twisted Beefheart blues, free jazz skronk, and post-grunge alt rock aggression, and though the group mellowed over the course of their next several albums, they remained just outside the mainstream during their original incarnation. Vantage Point is dEUS' second album after singer Tom Barman and violinist/keyboardist Klaas Janzoons reconvened the band with a new lineup in 2005, but unlike 2006's Pocket Revolution, which found the duo flirting with Coldplay-style dad rock, this set finds dEUS artfully balancing their experimental and pop tendencies as they did on fine mid-period albums like In a Bar Under the Sea and The Ideal Crash. Opening track "When She Comes Down" finds the common ground between Can's fluid Krautrock grooves and modern-day hip-hop, while the psychedelic shimmer of "The Vanishing of Maria Schneider" recalls near-forgotten '80s psych-popsters the Church. The piano-driven atmospherics of "Smokers Reflect" revert back to the sound of Pocket Revolution, but without sounding nearly so much like a feint towards the AOR adult alternative radio format. "Oh Your God" even harks back to the aggression of their 1994 debut, Worst Case Scenario, smartly leavening it with an unexpectedly pretty chorus. Always an underrated band, dEUS have surprisingly made a strong return to form with Vantage Point. © Stewart Mason /TiVo
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Pop - Released January 1, 2001 | Universal-Island Records Ltd.

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Alternative & Indie - Released September 19, 2011 | [PIAS] Recordings

More cinematic, melodic, and mellow than their usual experimental indie pop output, Keep You Close is the sixth studio album from one of Belgium's biggest musical exports, dEUS. Compared to the likes of Elbow, Tindersticks, and Broadcast, the follow-up to 2008's Vantage Point features the single "Constant Now" and two tracks featuring guest vocals from former Afghan Whigs frontman Greg Dulli ("Twice [We Survive]," "Dark Sets In"). © Jon O'Brien /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released September 19, 2011 | [PIAS] Recordings

More cinematic, melodic, and mellow than their usual experimental indie pop output, Keep You Close is the sixth studio album from one of Belgium's biggest musical exports, dEUS. Compared to the likes of Elbow, Tindersticks, and Broadcast, the follow-up to 2008's Vantage Point features the single "Constant Now" and two tracks featuring guest vocals from former Afghan Whigs frontman Greg Dulli ("Twice [We Survive]," "Dark Sets In"). © Jon O'Brien /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released April 21, 2008 | [PIAS] Cooperative

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released October 14, 2019 | Octiive

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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released October 13, 2019 | Octiive

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World - Released April 10, 2020 | IEH Music

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Electronic - Released April 24, 2020 | IEH Music

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Alternative & Indie - Released December 8, 2008 | V2 Cooperative Music

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Dance - Released April 11, 2011 | Nervous Records

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Pop - Released January 1, 1995 | Universal-Island Records Ltd.