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Bossa Nova & Brazil - Released January 1, 1967 | Philips

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
This 1967 LP was both Gal Costa's and Caetano Veloso's debut. It's a quiet, post-bossa nova effort characterized by fine singing and some very good songs, some of them penned by Veloso himself. In some ways, Domingo is more like a folk singer/songwriter album out of the '60s London scene than a Brazilian pop record. As it was, this was a deceptive calm-before-the-storm since both artists would soon play central roles in the wild, psychedelic experimental scene known as Tropicalia. It would take years of musical and political tumult before each of them regained their footing, which makes this relatively modest and innocent beginning all the more valuable. © Richard Mortifoglio /TiVo
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Bossa Nova & Brazil - Released April 8, 2016 | Uns Produções Artísticas ltda. - Gege Produções Artísticas ltda.

Distinctions 4F de Télérama
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Pop - Released January 1, 1967 | Universal Music Ltda.

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
One look at the doleful expression that Caetano Veloso wears on the cover of his third self-titled album, from 1971, and it's clear that the listener is in for a bummer. It's a dead-eyed look that says, "Friend, sit down, have a drink, and listen to my weary tale." And a weary homesick tale it is, for the man who only a few years earlier had been one of the catalysts in a revolution that sent the Brazilian music world on the psychedelic Beatles-lovin' roller coaster of Tropicalia was now living in the U.K. in a government-imposed exile. Gone are the Day-Glo flashes of his earlier albums, replaced by the realism of a revolutionary whose dreams have been shuttered. If there was any doubt to the depths of his melancholy, Veloso clears it up right away with "A Little More Blue," reflecting on being thrown in jail and declaring that his exile is worse than his Brazilian imprisonment. Even more dismal may be the lovesick tribute to his sister, "Maria Bethânia," which plainly spells out his physical and emotional disconnection. It's not all so dismal, though; there are upbeat songs as well, like the acknowledged classic "London, London" and the lone Portuguese-sung track, "Asa Branca." There are Brazilian touches in the drums and Veloso's phrasing, but the album is more in the tradition of downer folk classics like Bob Dylan's Blood on the Tracks and Tim Buckley's Happy Sad. If that seems like heavy company, then seek out this emotionally rich and complex work by an artist who doesn't merely stand on the shoulders of giants -- he is one of the giants. © Wade Kergan /TiVo
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Pop - Released January 1, 1972 | Universal Music Ltda.

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Released in 1972, Transa was recorded by Caetano Veloso during his exile in London, England, shortly before his return to Brazil. The sound of '70s electric rock predominates, fused with Brazilian rhythms and percussion, berimbau sounds, and his own violão playing. Several lyrics in English, and also in Portuguese, carefully avoid direct reference to politics, which may be found disguised in all songs, especially in the melancholic and depressed images of the poem by Gregório de Matos, "Triste Bahia," for which Veloso wrote the music. "It's a Long Way" also makes ciphered references to the political situation and was broadly played in the '70s. The broad use of pontos de capoeira (music used for accompaniment of capoeira, a martial art developed by Brazilian slaves as a resistance against the whites) can also be understood in that sense. The album also has "Mora na Filosofia," a classic and beautiful samba by Monsueto that scandalized people with its rock rendition. © Alvaro Neder /TiVo
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Bossa Nova & Brazil - Released November 27, 2012 | Universal Music Ltda.

Distinctions 3F de Télérama
Caetano Veloso's Abraçaço is the final album in the trilogy that began with Cê in 2006 and continued with Zii e Zie in 2010. These recordings aren't related conceptually, but musically. He collaborated with the same trio of younger players from the Carioca pop fringe -- guitarist Pedro Sá (who co-produced the set with Veloso's son Moreno), drummer Marcelo Callado, and bassist Ricardo Dias. These songs are rangey, full of compelling sounds and unexpected dynamic and textural shifts. The word "abraçaço" is Portuguese for "big hug." Veloso has embraced all the music between his early tropicalia style and the newer, edgier indie pop of Brazil, and treads that winding path throughout. Opener "A Bossa Nova é Foda" (translation: "Bossa Nova Is Fucking Great") has little in common with what we normally associate with the genre. The only real references to it are brief instrumental quotes from tunes by Tom Jobim and Vinicius Moraes in the bridge. Bouncing guitars and clipped snares are angular and edgy as Veloso employs both his falsetto and a lower, nearly guttural form of expression -- akin to Tibetan throat singing. In the stellar ballad "Estou Triste," Veloso's plaintive baritone slides gradually toward his falsetto, transforming the wealth of the tune's emotion in the process. A gently pulsing electric guitar becomes more insistent and spirals in a solo as a painterly hi-hat evolves into near rolling thunder. The title track reaches into cumbia and funk. The stinging, fuzzed-out guitar solo pushes the envelope but it stays in the pocket of a hooky melody. "Quero Ser Justo" is a lithe, poetic romantic ballad with a sharp, bubbling bassline. The drums and rhythms in "O Império da Lei" come from northeastern Brazil. While the song is bright, even cheerful in tone, its lyric unveils a dark tale of politically motivated murder with only the guitars hinting at the turbulence in the narrative. The militant "Um Comunista" uses dub reggae, jazz, and indie rock and folk music in a cannily unified groove. "Funk Melódico" is a clattering, noisy exercise in multiple rhythms and vocal percussion; it actually recalls some of the wild music found on 1989's Estrangeiro. Bossa nova gets a more formal embrace on "Quando o Galo Cantou." Though the tune is laid-back and generally more settled, it does hold some (gentle) melodic and dynamic surprises. The set closes on a quieter note with "Gayana," a slow, processional romantic ballad with keyboard, guitar, and malleted cymbals underscoring each tenderly sung line. Abraçaço is the most sophisticated, alluring, and captivating offering in this trilogy. Not content to rest on his laurels, Veloso remains a vital, restless artist. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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Pop - Released January 1, 1979 | Universal Music Ltda.

Distinctions The Unusual Suspects
One of Caetano Veloso's last quasi-acoustic albums, this one is dedicated to Brazilian grooves (with the exception of a couple of reggae tracks). The album has been very well spun, and several tracks were hits: "Lua de São Jorge," "Oração ao Tempo," "Badauê" (Bahian grooves), "Cajuína" (Northeastern xote), "Menino do Rio" (pop ballad), "Elegia" (bolero), "Trilhos Urbanos" (reggae), "Louco por Você" (Carioca samba). There are also other tracks whose experimental character prevented them from being hits, but they still constitute excellent material. Delicate and also swinging arrangements, these are excellent compositions by an artist still in full-steam creative impetus. © Alvaro Neder /TiVo
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Bossa Nova & Brazil - Released January 16, 2020 | Universal Music Ltda.

Caetano Veloso, a unique singer with an almost otherworldly charm, has featured on other musicians’ music throughout his career, which is now entering its sixth decade. Amongst many others, these include the music of his old sidekick Gilberto Gil, of his diva sister Maria Bethânia, of his mentor the immense João Gilberto and that of the great Cesaria Evora. These collaborations came about naturally for sheer enjoyment, either out of curiosity or friendship. Veloso is enough in himself – his voice and guitar transport the listener into a rich and sensual world where both poetry and intelligence resonate deeply and he leads the way without fear of adventure and experimentation. At 78 years old, Veloso has often combined his talent with that of his sons, Moreno, Zeca and Tom, performing with them on stage, as well as Bahian clarinettist Ivan Sacerdote, the wild child of popular music. Heir to the great Paulo Moura, a partner of Hermeto Pascoal, Paulinho da Viola and Seu Jorge, Sacerdote has swiftly risen to the same level as the greats. On this album, which was partially recorded in New York, Veloso revisits some old musical gems in an intimate dialogue between his voice, his guitar and the inspired and velvety smooth playing of the young clarinettist. Time has gone by and although his notes remain steady, the youthful vitality that animated his classics O Ciume, Você Não Gosta De Mim, and Desde Que O Samba É Samba when they were first played, is more subdued here. A special place is reserved for the reinterpretation of three absolute pearls from his 1998 masterpiece LIvro (Minha Voz, Minha Vida, Onde O Rio É Mais Baiano et Manhatã). A record that doesn’t cut corners and doesn’t disappoint. © Benjamin MiNiMuM/Qobuz
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Pop - Released May 25, 2018 | Universal Music Ltda.

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Bossa Nova & Brazil - Released January 1, 2012 | Universal Music Ltda.

In 1994, Caetano Veloso released the Cd Fina estampa, singing boleros. The huge success of that album conduced him to conceive the live show, where this album was recorded. Fans of Caetano will welcome his wonderfully sensitive and energetic interpretations for Brazilian and Latin classics, after roughly one decade and a half dealing with mostly commercial albums. In magnificent acoustic orchestral arrangements where there is room for minimalistic performances, accompanied by a single pandeiro or violão and even alla capella, he covers sambas, boleros, valses, march, bossa nova and samba de gafieira. Deserve mention, among other superb renditions, his "Haiti," the beautiful sambas (performed as bossa) "Canção de amor" (Chocolate/Elano de Paula) and "Suas mãos" (Pernambuco/Antônio Maria), the valse "Lábios que beijei" (Álvaro Nunes/Leonel Azevedo), the samba "Você esteve com meu bem?" (João Gilberto/Antônio C. Martins) interpreted in the gafieira style, the fundamental bolero "La barca" in a sensitive violão rendition, the vanguardist "O pulsar" (written together with the concrete poet Augusto de Campos), and the tropicalist "Soy loco por ti, America" (Gilberto Gil/Capinam). © Alvaro Neder /TiVo

Pop - Released January 1, 2004 | Universal Music Ltda.

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When an international artist records an English-language album, crossover is usually in the cards. For Caetano Veloso, however, it's an entirely different matter. The statesman of Brazilian pop, a musical giant who is on track to record more in his fifth decade of artistic striving than in any other (not to mention his accompanying exploits in literature), Veloso has no need to begin an American campaign. He also has shown no wish to. Caetano Veloso has never courted an American audience, though he has drawn a sizeable one because of his prescient, emotionally charged songwriting and a performance style that can be studied or unhinged depending on the circumstances required. A Foreign Sound is not only an English-language album but an American songbook, one that explores Veloso's long fascination with the greatest composers in American history. It began when he was a child in the '40s and '50s enamored of American culture, was strengthened when his hero João Gilberto began championing the great American songbook, and has remained steady if not continuous through his artistic career. The record is perhaps his most ambitious project ever, a 22-song album that ranges for its material from emperors of Broadway to the denizens of folk music, from the cultured (Rodgers & Hart's "Manhattan") to the torchy (Jerome Kern's "Smoke Gets in Your Eyes") to the gritty (Nirvana's "Come as You Are"). Veloso's high tenor has only strengthened 30 years after his other English-language record -- an eponymous 1971 LP, recorded in London as a forlorn postcard to the country he had been forcibly removed from by Brazil's fascist-leaning government. Although few recordings in his discography (or any other's) can rival that one's emotional power, A Foreign Sound comes very close. Veloso transforms these standards by a clever combination of his subtle interpretive gifts, his precise, literate delivery, and his ability to frame each song with an arrangement that fits perfectly (usually either a small group led by his acoustic guitar or a small string group, though "Love for Sale" is given a spine-tingling a cappella treatment). Out of 22 songs, only Bob Dylan's "It's Alright, Ma (I'm Only Bleeding)" sounds like a mistake; every other performance here is nearly irresistible, the perfect valentine to a country with a strong songwriting tradition that Veloso unites and celebrates with this album. © John Bush /TiVo
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Pop - Released January 1, 1975 | Universal Music Ltda.

On Qualquer Coisa, Caetano Veloso still wasn't the superstar he became in the '80s, when he turned himself in a mainstream pop artist. This album sounds underground in its voice/violão renditions, parsimony in the arrangements, and absence of luxury effects or electronics -- in other words, the focus is on Veloso's guitar, voice, melodies, and lyrics. His wonderful cool interpretations for "Qualquer Coisa," "Samba e Amor," "A Tua Presença Morena," "Drume Negrinha," "Jorge da Capadócia," "Eleanor Rigby," "For No One," "Lady Madonna," and "La Flor de la Canela," among others, became classics. © Alvaro Neder /TiVo
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Pop - Released January 1, 2005 | Universal Music Ltda.

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Bossa Nova & Brazil - Released January 11, 1985 | Universal Music Ltda.

In the tradition of many records out of Brazil, this album was issued with virtually no information as to its provenance (although Fontana was sure to include a couple of hunky photos of Veloso!), but it appears to be a collection of songs from the ten or so years prior to its release. Depending on the listener's predilection for the singer in pop group surroundings or as a solo performer, this could be heard as a perfectly fine sampler of Veloso's work from this period, the one just before his American "debut" on the spectacular Nonesuch album Caetano Veloso. For many listeners, the saccharine string and pop arrangements will make some of the pieces difficult to bear, Veloso's incredible voice and his heart-rending melodies all but buried under layers of gooey pap. But, as those experienced with his music understand, this is often part and parcel of many of his recordings, particularly the ones originating in his home country. Many of his finest songs are included here, such as "O Quereres," "Luz do Sol," and "O Leãozinho," though it's certainly arguable that all get better treatment elsewhere (though his rendition of "Sampa" is stunningly beautiful). Still, taken at face value, Veloso's pure musicality and transcendent singing make wading through all the sludge a not altogether unenjoyable task. It's worth it for Veloso completists or those who, somehow, are attempting to approach Brazilian pop from a treacly jazz-pop standpoint. © Brian Olewnick /TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1994 | Universal Music Mexico

In his 26th album, devoted to the Hispanic market that quickly reached the Latin Top Ten at Tower, Veloso sings great classics and new songs in Spanish, several recalled from his childhood; among them are boleros, rumbas, guarânias, and canções of Cuba ("Rumba Azul," "Contigo en la Distancia," "Maria la O," "Mi Cocodrilo Verde"), Argentina ("Un Vestido y un Amor," "Vete de Mi," Piazzolla's "Vuelvo Al Sur," and "Pecado," the latter two in bossa style), Mexico ("Maria Bonita," "La Golondrina"), Paraguay ("Recuerdos de Ypacarai"), Peru ("Fina Estampa"), Puerto Rico ("Capullito de Aleli," "Lamento Borincano"), and Venezuela ("Tonada de Luna Llena"). A sensitive, delicate acoustic release in which Veloso's precious vocal interpretations (without vibrato) are backed by string, wood, cello, and rhythmic sections. The instrumental arrangements (by Jaques Morelenbaum) are based less in the fundamental orchestrations of the '40s and are more erudite. This studio album was so successful in terms of critics and selling that it yielded a live show from which was recorded a live album, Fina Estampa Ao Vivo. © Alvaro Neder /TiVo
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Pop - Released January 1, 1999 | Universal Music Ltda.

Caetano Veloso's admiration and reverance to the cinema poetry of Federico Fellini is notorious. Through his song "Giulietta Masina" (prohibited in Brazil due to a profanity), Fellini's sister Maddalena knew Veloso's devotion to her brother and asked him to have a tribute concert (in which this album was recorded), which was held in October 1987 at the Teatro Nuovo, Dogana (San Marino Republic). In the booklet, Veloso explains in his own words the relevance of each song for a Fellini tribute. Veloso wasn't in top form, maybe due to the emotion of facing his longtime idol's image. But in spite of some vocal deficiencies, his interpretation is as sincere as it can be, delivering with delicacy the mysterious quality so dear to the filmmaker. "Que Não Se Vê," Veloso's version of Nino Rota/T. Amurri's "Come Tu Me Vuoi," was dedicated to Marcello Mastroianni. Other songs taken from Fellini's film soundtracks were "Gelsomina" (M. Galdieri/Nino Rota), and "Patricia" (Damaso Peres Prado, a version by Bourges from the film La Dolce Vita). "Luna Rossa" is a popular Neapolitan song, performed in bossa rhythm, which was included because of its theme, the moon. The originals are "Trilhos Uurbanos," "Giulietta Masina," "Lua, Lua, Lua," and "Coração Vagabundo." An additional bossa is "Chega de Saudade" (No More Blues). Delicacy is the central concept here, where nostalgia and melancholy also met each other. Backed by the usual competence of Jaques Morelenbaum, Luiz Brasil, Jorge Helder, and Carlos Balla, this album is suited for those who can't stand the electric pop style present in some of Veloso's albums. © Alvaro Neder /TiVo
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Pop - Released January 1, 1969 | Universal Music Ltda.

This second Caetano Veloso solo LP was recorded in June 1969, when Veloso and Gilberto Gil were behind the bars of the military dictatorship. The albums (Gil also recorded his own) were devised in part to provide them with a connection to the outside world through which authorities would be discouraged in attempting some violence against them. The voices were unsophisticatedly recorded with the sole backing of their own violões and a metronome, and the arrangements were added later in the studio, which was an indigenous and competent subversion of the basics of production, especially if you take into consideration the available technology at that time. The general tone of this album is coherent with the depressing moment Veloso and the rest of the country were going through. The English lyrics of his "The Empty Boat" have several strong images of desperation and sadness. The fado "Os Argonautas" represents implicitly the aspiration that, as Portugal had got ridden of Salazar (in the precedent year by a stroke), Brazil could also got rid of its dictatorship. The superbly modern arrangements of Rogério Duprat and the songs "Não Identificado," "Acrilírico," and "Marcianita," on the other hand, contribute to the anarchic, chaotic, and psychedelic setting of Tropicalia in which make part the rustic fuzzed-out guitars. But maybe the most important thing here is the evident artistic sincerity felt throughout the album: it is when the listener feels himself as a voyeur, peeping through the artist's deepest emotions. © Alvaro Neder /TiVo
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Jazz - Released November 1, 1998 | Universal Music Ltda.

Caetano Veloso continues his free-thinking explorations of tropicalismo on this ambitiously arranged, elaborately packaged suite of songs devoted to whatever happens to cross his mind. Veloso says that he was listening a lot to the collaborations of Miles Davis and Gil Evans around this time, and Jaques Morelenbaum's charts often reflect their darkly urbane ethos. Yet for Morelenbaum's yin there is also the yang of the battering Bahian percussion that dominates many of the rhythm tracks. "Livros" in Portuguese means "books," so Veloso gives you a sample of his book Verdade Tropical in the booklet notes and pays eloquent tribute to them on the title track: "Books are transcendental things/But we can love them with our hands." He is alternately awestruck and appalled by the ambiguities of New York City on "Manhata"; here, the arrangement definitely contains haunting echoes of Evans. He can venture into atonality on "Doideca" (12-tone, but pointedly translated in the booklet as "loony"), recite the horrors of a slave ship voyage, tell someone off ("Nao Enche," which means "Piss Off"), or simply sing "How beautiful could a being be" over and over, presumably to a child, in falsetto to a hot groove. One of the most amazing songs is an epic about the life of Alexander the Great; it comes off like a great saga song. Finally, he runs down a long list of all his favorite Brazilian singers, seemingly leaving out no one, only to close with "Better than this there's only silence/And better than silence, only Joao." Can't add anything to that, except don't miss this CD if you love Brazilian music. © Richard S. Ginell /TiVo
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Pop - Released January 1, 1971 | Universal Music Ltda.

One look at the doleful expression that Caetano Veloso wears on the cover of his third self-titled album, from 1971, and it's clear that the listener is in for a bummer. It's a dead-eyed look that says, "Friend, sit down, have a drink, and listen to my weary tale." And a weary homesick tale it is, for the man who only a few years earlier had been one of the catalysts in a revolution that sent the Brazilian music world on the psychedelic Beatles-lovin' roller coaster of Tropicalia was now living in the U.K. in a government-imposed exile. Gone are the Day-Glo flashes of his earlier albums, replaced by the realism of a revolutionary whose dreams have been shuttered. If there was any doubt to the depths of his melancholy, Veloso clears it up right away with "A Little More Blue," reflecting on being thrown in jail and declaring that his exile is worse than his Brazilian imprisonment. Even more dismal may be the lovesick tribute to his sister, "Maria Bethânia," which plainly spells out his physical and emotional disconnection. It's not all so dismal, though; there are upbeat songs as well, like the acknowledged classic "London, London" and the lone Portuguese-sung track, "Asa Branca." There are Brazilian touches in the drums and Veloso's phrasing, but the album is more in the tradition of downer folk classics like Bob Dylan's Blood on the Tracks and Tim Buckley's Happy Sad. If that seems like heavy company, then seek out this emotionally rich and complex work by an artist who doesn't merely stand on the shoulders of giants -- he is one of the giants. © Wade Kergan /TiVo
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Bossa Nova & Brazil - Released May 12, 2015 | Universal Music Ltda.

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Pop - Released January 1, 1972 | Universal Music Ltda.

An exciting live recording of Caetano Veloso with fellow Tropicalista Chico Buarque at a performance in Salvador. A wonderful example of the kind of mania that surrounded Veloso's return from exile and his unselfishness when it came to sharing the spotlight. © John Dougan /TiVo