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R&B - Released October 30, 2001 | UNI - MOTOWN

Released a decade into Boyz II Men's enormously successful career and a year after another best-of collection, Ballad Collection, Legacy: The Greatest Hits Collection puts all the quartet's hits on one disc. Songs like "Motownphilly" and "End of the Road" were phenomenons during their reign atop the Billboard charts, and many of the other songs here were nearly as ubiquitous at various points in the '90s. Boyz II Men's success simmered out a bit toward the latter end of the '90s, but that doesn't mean they weren't performing great songs. Even if singles like "Song for Mama" didn't dominate the airwaves like the group's early-'90s hits, they're still amazing. Not surprisingly, Legacy focuses on Boyz II Men's first two albums -- Cooleyhighharmony and II -- and not so much on Evolution and Nathan Michael Shawn Wanya. Overall, this best-of is a great place to get all of Boyz II Men's hits if you're not one of the millions of people who bought the original LPs. © Jason Birchmeier /TiVo
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R&B - Released January 1, 2011 | UNI - MOTOWN

No mere breakthrough, 1991's Cooleyhighharmony was one of the decade's biggest debuts, setting Boyz II Men well on their path to becoming what the RIAA certified the most successful R&B group of all time. Their sound, dubbed "hip-hop doo-wop" and aided in large part by the productions and arrangements of Dallas Austin, was a shrewd and flexible mix of contemporary and throwback elements. Fully exploiting the members' stunning vocal chops on ballads as a close harmony group, while hardly washed out when matched with densely layered upbeat material (new jack swing was still in full flight), the group put a mature collegiate spin on what were, at the time, the last two New Edition albums, updating the techniques reminiscent of the doo wop covered on Under the Blue Moon within a set that was as modern-sounding as the singles off Heart Break. It contains that rare mix of hot singles with several album cuts that could have just as easily been hits, the ultimate measure of a release that is both commercially and creatively successful. While the album was carried by four Top Ten R&B singles, two of which -- the swinging, anthemic "Motownphilly" and an a cappella version of the Cooley High soundtrack's "It's So Hard to Say Goodbye to Yesterday," the tear duct activator of 1991/1992 -- went Top Five on the pop chart, there is substantial depth. The non-single highlights include the sweet slow jam "This Is My Heart," sonically somewhere between Gwen Guthrie's "Outside in the Rain" and an organic Babyface ballad, and the frantic new jack swinger "Under Pressure," perhaps too much like "Motownphilly" or Dallas Austin's most chaotic Bomb Squad-inspired productions. In its original ten-song form, in fact, Cooleyhighharmony is a brisk 40-minute set built for front-to-back listening, though the sequencing is more natural with the "adagio" and "allegro" halves switched up. For many of those responsible for its multi-platinum status, it is the album of the early '90s, "Uhh Ahh"'s amusing libidinal melisma notwithstanding. © Andy Kellman /TiVo
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II

Pop - Released August 30, 1994 | UNI - MOTOWN

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With their second album, II, Boyz II Men assured their place at the top of the charts, as well as history. "I'll Make Love to You," the album's first single, stayed on the top of the charts for over two months, only to be unseated by "On Bended Knee," the album's second single. Not surprisingly, II is a carefully constructed crowd pleaser, accentuating all of the finest moments from their hit debut. While there are some high-energy dance tracks, the album's main strength is its slower numbers, where the group's vocals soar. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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II

R&B - Released August 30, 1994 | Motown

With their second album, II, Boyz II Men assured their place at the top of the charts, as well as history. "I'll Make Love to You," the album's first single, stayed on the top of the charts for over two months, only to be unseated by "On Bended Knee," the album's second single. Not surprisingly, II is a carefully constructed crowd pleaser, accentuating all of the finest moments from their hit debut. While there are some high-energy dance tracks, the album's main strength is its slower numbers, where the group's vocals soar. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Pop - Released January 1, 2001 | Universal-Island Records Ltd.

Released a decade into Boyz II Men's enormously successful career and a year after another best-of collection, Ballad Collection, Legacy: The Greatest Hits Collection puts all the quartet's hits on one disc. Songs like "Motownphilly" and "End of the Road" were phenomenons during their reign atop the Billboard charts, and many of the other songs here were nearly as ubiquitous at various points in the '90s. Boyz II Men's success simmered out a bit toward the latter end of the '90s, but that doesn't mean they weren't performing great songs. Even if singles like "Song for Mama" didn't dominate the airwaves like the group's early-'90s hits, they're still amazing. Not surprisingly, Legacy focuses on Boyz II Men's first two albums -- Cooleyhighharmony and II -- and not so much on Evolution and Nathan Michael Shawn Wanya. Overall, this best-of is a great place to get all of Boyz II Men's hits if you're not one of the millions of people who bought the original LPs. © Jason Birchmeier /TiVo
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Pop - Released January 1, 1997 | Motown

Evolution is supposed to capture Boyz II Men in full maturity, but it sounds surprisingly similar to their blockbuster II. Like that album, Evolution relies on ballads, downplaying the group's dance-pop side. There are still several up-tempo numbers on the record, but it's clear that the group and their producers were more concerned with smooth ballads like "4 Seasons of Loneliness" and "A Song for Mama," which they deliver with typical grace. However, Boyz II Men's signature sound is beginning to sound like a formula, especially since the group fails to offer any new twists on their trademark hip-hop doo wop. There's enough strong material on Evolution to satisfy Boyz II Men's large fan base, but they will truly need to evolve on their fourth album in order to stay viable. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Ambient/New Age - Released October 5, 1993 | Motown

Boyz II Men followed their hugely successful debut, Cooleyhighharmony, with Christmas Interpretations, which is a pretty intelligent choice, given that Christmas albums by established artists tend to sell year after year, while pop albums tend to sell mostly at the time of their popularity. So this album of all new Christmas material (written by the Boyz themselves) certainly helped the Boyz flesh out their catalog. There aren't any interpretations of Christmas classics to be found on this record, save for their a cappella rendition of "Silent Night." This album is pure, lushly produced quiet storm and, because of the lack of traditional favorites, could be played at any time of year. This set differs from typical Boyz II Men albums in that it's very subdued, and vocal histrionics are kept at a minimum. This set also differs from traditional Christmas albums in that the songs generally deal with more melancholy subject matter, such as depression and suffering ("Why Christmas") and loneliness and poverty ("Cold December Nights"). It's also balanced with songs about the joys of giving (the elegant "Share Love," "Do They Know") and, of course, love ("You're Not Alone," "Who Would Have Thought"). This set also features "Let It Snow," a Top 40 duet with maestro Brian McKnight, who co-produced nearly every song on this album (it should have been titled Boyz II Men featuring Brian McKnight). This set is a cozy, velvety, and hip quiet storm Christmas album with touches of jazz, nostalgia, and melancholy but, at times, one yearns to hear the Boyz' lush harmonies wrapped around traditional favorites. Nonetheless, a nice chapter in the saga that is Boyz II Men. © Jose F. Promis /TiVo
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R&B - Released January 1, 2009 | Hip-O Select

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R&B - Released May 20, 2002 | Arista

Boyz II Men grew up with 2000's Nathan Michael Shawn Wanya, providing a really fine, mature urban soul album, but not many noticed, so it was time for another new start in 2002. They left Motown and signed with Arista, where Antonio "L.A." Reid had successfully set up shop, breaking new acts and re-establishing old ones -- with the latter clearly in mind when he executive produced Boyz II Men's Full Circle, with the Boyz handling production duties. Everybody involved apparently decided that the best way to bring the boyz into the 2000s is by hedging their bets: offering a little of the stilted, early-'80s funk-influenced hip-hop that marked modern soul, while offering a lot of adult contemporary balladry. Although the group doesn't delve too hard into funk, it still doesn't mesh particularly well together, especially since the material, while well-sung as ever, isn't particularly distinguished. That doesn't mean it's bad -- the album is pleasant enough as it spins -- but it's simply not that memorable, which is quite a disappointment after the very, very nice Nathan Michael Shawn Wanya. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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R&B - Released November 13, 2007 | Decca Crossover

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R&B - Released January 1, 2011 | Universal Music Group International

Disc one of Twenty constitutes Boyz II Men's first full-length set of original material since 2002’s Full Circle, an album released just prior to the departure of bass vocalist Michael McCary. The title here isn’t the only manner in which the group acknowledges its longevity. They work with past collaborators such as Tim & Bob, Teddy Riley, and Babyface, each of whom either produces or co-produces three tracks. Rather than attempt to compete with younger acts on the charts, they largely stick to their tried and true approach and appeal to their longtime listeners. Some of the slower songs get a little raunchy, but most of them -- highlighted by “More Than You’ll Ever Know,” featuring Charlie Wilson -- switch between romantic pleading and uplifting/inspirational modes. It’s their most enjoyable work since 2000’s Nathan Michael Shawn Wanya. On the second disc, Boyz II Men cover themselves. In some cases, the new looks at their hits are closer to re-creations than reinterpretations, with only slight variations on the vocal and instrumental arrangements. That Boyz II Men still have it, both individually and collectively, is undeniable; their group harmonies sound as easy as ever. That’s what they had over most contemporary R&B acts in 1991, and that's what they have over all of them in 2011. © Andy Kellman /TiVo

Ambient/New Age - Released December 18, 2020 | UMG Recordings, Inc.

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R&B - Released October 20, 2017 | Masterworks

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World - Released January 1, 1995 | Motown

A Spanish version of their blockbuster second album, Yo Te Voy A Amar is necessary for Boyz II Men's Spanish-speaking fans, since it loses none of the lush, seductive qualities of the original English version and is filled with winning performances by the group. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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R&B - Released August 30, 2000 | Universal Records

Even if Boyz II Men's third album Evolution didn't rival II in terms of commercial clout, the group was still inescapable. Every male urban vocal group that reached the pop and R&B charts were clearly indebted to the quartet's stylish blend of old-school harmony, post-Aretha hyper-vocalizing, and lite hip-hop beats. The group returned to action in the fall of 2000 with Nathan Michael Shawn Wanya, a nearly eponymous title for their first full-fledged adult album. And, as adults, they've made sure they're responsible for their own music -- at least one member (usually all) has songwriting credits for all but two of the album's 14 songs, and the group is credited with all but four of the album's productions. Usually, when a popular group seizes control of their reins in such a dramatic fashion, the result is muddled to say the least, but a remarkable thing happens here -- the group succeeds. True, they don't expand on the formula they developed on II, but they do fulfill the expectations that album set. There are no unexpected twists or turns, just the standard lush ballads and swinging hip-hop soul, but it delivers both sonically and substantively. Not every cut on the record is a standout, but even the average cuts are pleasant, and the best of the batch are either seductive or effortlessly danceable. Also, the group is beginning to cut back on their vocal histrionics, resulting in a record that is truly their most mature yet. It might not be their best -- it doesn't have the powerhouse singles of II -- but Boyz II Men make up for it by demonstrating that they can do much of this on their own, and still sound like the standard-bearers for urban soul. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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R&B - Released January 1, 2009 | Decca Crossover

The title of Boyz II Men’s third consecutive covers album is only partially indicative. The love songs covered on this disc span several decades and styles, unlike Throwback (‘70s and early-‘80s funk and soul) and Motown: A Journey Through Hitsville USA (self-explanatory), both of which were more focused thematically. What ties these songs together is that they are love songs, and nothing else. That early-‘60s R&B (Sam Cooke’s “Cupid”), late-‘90s country (Lonestar’s “Amazed”), and early-‘80s rock (Journey’s “Open Arms,” a choice likely influenced by producer Randy Jackson) are all part of the mix only hints at the randomness of the selections. Despite the range of the sources, Boyz II Men tie it all together, nearly to a fault. The group makes the occasional modification to the originals, like the ticking-clock vocal effect on Cyndi Lauper’s “Time After Time”; otherwise, if you know the originals, and you know Boyz II Men, you can play these versions in your head without having heard them. © Andy Kellman /TiVo
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R&B - Released January 1, 2007 | Decca Crossover

Three years after the all-covers Throwback -- a release that included some pleasantly surprising choices for new looks, like One Way's "Cutie Pie" and Bobby Caldwell's "What You Won't Do for Love" -- Boyz II Men reappear with yet another covers affair. As indicated by the title, the trio changes its focus to Motown for a set that ranges thematically and chronologically from the Temptations' "Just My Imagination" to Marvin Gaye's "Mercy Mercy Me (The Ecology)" to the Commodores' "Easy" -- and, as something of a sly acknowledgment that they were once on Motown themselves, they close out the set with an a cappella version of "End of the Road" (featuring Brian McKnight). Their backing is mostly all-star caliber, including the Dap-Kings Horns, drummer Vinnie Colaiuta, percussionist Luis Conte, and string arranger Larry Gold. The material tends to work best when they sound relatively relaxed, as opposed to when it is obvious that they are trying very hard to honor the originals while being over-demonstrative with their obviously gifted voices. It's not that the disc won't please fans, because it likely will, despite Boyz II Men's continued shortage of new songs; but it's nearly impossible at this point to add anything to the likes of "It's the Same Old Song," "Ain't Nothing Like the Real Thing," or "Money (That's What I Want)" -- no matter how well they are handled. © Andy Kellman /TiVo
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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released February 20, 2014 | Marylebone Records

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R&B - Released November 13, 2007 | Decca Crossover

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R&B - Released October 1, 2012 | Firefly Entertainment