Your basket is empty

Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

From
CD€13.99

Pop - Released January 1, 2011 | Capitol Records

Essential spotlights Bobby McFerrin's hits recorded in the '80s and '90s and includes "Another Night in Tunisia" and "Don't Worry Be Happy." This 15-track set is perfect for the casual listener, but contains nothing that the collector does not already own. © Al Campbell /TiVo
From
CD€13.99

Reggae - Released January 1, 1996 | Blue Note Records

The highlights of vocal acrobat Bobby McFerrin's eclectic career are featured on this collection, which includes samples of his work with the St. Paul Chamber Orchestra, Chick Corea, the Yellowjackets, Manhattan Transfer, and Jon Hendricks. Among the selections are "Spain," "Blue Bossa," and the cloying hit "Don't Worry, Be Happy." © Jason Ankeny /TiVo
From
CD€13.99

Vocal Jazz - Released January 1, 1988 | Parlophone Catalogue

This CD will always be remembered for including Bobby McFerrin's surprise hit "Don't Worry, Be Happy." Actually, overall, this album is not quite up to the level of his previous two, for instead of taking unaccompanied vocals, the remarkable singer overdubbed his voice many times, which reduces the miraculous nature of his talents. However, McFerrin's renditions of "Drive My Car," "Drive," and "Sunshine of Your Love" (the program is quite diverse), plus the catchy "Don't Worry," are generally unique and worth hearing. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
From
CD€16.99

Jazz - Released September 13, 2005 | Nonesuch

From
CD€14.49

Classical - Released April 1, 1997 | Sony Classical

Back in the late 1980s, Bobby McFerrin unveiled his sensational a cappella vocal group Voicestra, but the peripatetic singer/composer (and now conductor) waited nearly a decade before putting anything out in that concept, and on a classical label yet! Taking the lead, the rubber-voiced McFerrin sets up revolving wordless vocal patterns, and he and the group improvise what amount to eight individual mantras. The songs have no titles -- only "Circlesong One," "Circlesong Two," et al -- yet they use all kinds of African, Middle Eastern, and other vocal or vocal percussive techniques, as well as studio production embellishments, to shape them after the fact. The 12 singers in this Voicestra are a freely eclectic mixture of R&B, gospel, pop, and jazz vocalists (including the Manhattan Transfer's Janis Siegel), performance artists, opera and classical singers, yet they blend together in an astonishingly homogenous manner when used in this fashion. The first "Circlesong" is the most immediately fetching, built around a single riff as McFerrin hollers and moans over the shifting voices, but all of them contain some amazing ideas, and at a mere 42 minutes, the album does not wear out its welcome as it might have, had McFerrin stretched the music out to the usual CD length. It's hard to figure out what category to put this disc in -- maybe next to Ladysmith Black Mambazo on the world music shelf -- but labels don't matter in a soundworld with this much imagination and heart. © Richard S. Ginell /TiVo
From
CD€16.99

Jazz - Released January 1, 1970 | Nonesuch

From
HI-RES€16.99
CD€14.49

Jazz - Released May 13, 2013 | Masterworks

Hi-Res Booklet
From
CD€9.99

Classical - Released July 18, 1995 | Sony Classical

From
CD€13.99

Jazz - Released January 1, 2002 | Blue Note Records

Creative vocalist Bobby McFerrin's return to Blue Note after a nearly ten-year absence indicates a possible desire for a return to improvised jazz, and in a way distancing himself from the classical works he had become increasingly associated with. Working again with pianist Chick Corea and producer Linda Goldstein, his 2002 album, Beyond Words, is reminiscent of the other McFerrin/Corea collaborations (Play, The Mozart Sessions), but somehow these mostly improvised works lack the spark that their previous partnerships have created. Ably backed by Corea's bright piano, Omar Hakim on drums, and Richard Bona on bass, the songs feel to be all the same texture for the most part, never reaching any kind of a peak throughout the album. Beyond Words is a moody and dark affair, with subtle layers of McFerrin's undulating vocals weaving in and out of the musical bed, but instead of sounding earthy and natural, the album is punctuated by synthesized instruments that pull the recordings dangerously close to smooth jazz territory. Unfortunately, by taking one of the most articulate players of man's earliest instrument and layering it in slick, fretless basslines and synthetic Roland XP-80 chords, it almost defeats the purpose of hearing his voice altogether. Still, it is an excellently performed and cleanly produced document of both McFerrin and Corea's abilities, ideal for gentle background textures on a night in alone. © Zac Johnson /TiVo
From
CD€13.99

Vocal Jazz - Released March 29, 2010 | Emarcy

Bobby McFerrin has always been a wildly restless talent, continually looking to develop fresh ideas for the human voice and place it in -- sometimes wildly -- different contexts from simple folk and pop songs to improvisational settings to strident compositional frameworks. His productions include duet records with instrumentalists Chick Corea and Yo-Yo Ma, as well as the creation of a virtual a cappella choir from his own vocal overdubs. All of this said, there has always been “something missing” from his recorded works that shows itself in concert, outside recording studio confines. On VOCAbuLarieS he seems to have found it. This is the work that anyone remotely interested in McFerrin needs to hear. Collaborating with composer, arranger, and conductor Roger Treece over seven years, McFerrin’s been given a foil who not only understands his previous output, but can focus his ideas and take them to the next developmental peak. The pair employed over 50 vocalists from different genres and nations to create a virtual choir in the studio. According to a press release, they cut over 1,400 vocal tracks. The music here is “fusion” in the most seamless and beautiful sense of the word: classical, pop, soul, Middle Eastern, African, and Eastern European vocal traditions all move together, and encounter one another head-on. They meld into a whole where the seams show, but are elegantly aurally tailored to create something entirely new -- even if the material always isn’t. Three selections here come from the controversially beautiful Medicine Music album, from 1996. But the versions here are radically different than the originals; the voices, rhythms, textures, and even ambiences of these voices have a more muscular quality, much more forceful and complex while simultaneously being more "listenable." The opener, “Baby,” provides proof. In the original it was a simple folk song, a lullaby with African roots; here is it a harmonically challenging, intricate labyrinth where 22 singers accompany McFerrin as well as a rhythm section. ”Wailers” is a pulsing chant with Middle Eastern, African, and Eastern European harmonies woven together by singers who include Sussan Deyhim, Luciana Souza, and Janis Siegel. ”He Ran to the Train” combines -- in a wholly new way -- two tracks from Medicine Music in an explosively knotty, compellingly emotional call-and-response piece that is as rhythmically complex as it is harmonically. The set closes with “Brief Eternity,” a new piece of modern sacred music that evokes everything from Gregorian chant and polyphony to John Tavener and Arvo Pärt. VOCAbuLarieS is easily McFerrin’s finest moment on record as well as his most ambitious, and should win him some new fans even among cynics. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
From
CD€13.99

Jazz - Released January 1, 1995 | Blue Note Records

Bobby McFerrin has made relatively few recordings since his hit "Don't Worry, Be Happy." Potentially one of the truly great creative vocalists, McFerrin has flashes of brilliance on this Blue Note CD, including a haunting rendition of Miles Davis' "Selim" (taken from the trumpeter's underrated Live-Evil set), but the singer's original material is generally forgettable. McFerrin overdubbed extra voices on many selections, which is quite unnecessary considering his range and ability to sing nonstop; he emphasizes dance and R&B rhythms, and there is often little to the songs other than the grooves and the sound of his voice. In addition, the members of the Yellowjackets are underutilized, although Russell Ferrante co-wrote three of McFerrin's eight songs. A disappointment. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
From
CD€14.49

Classical - Released October 9, 1996 | Sony Classical

From
CD€13.99

Jazz - Released January 1, 1992 | Blue Note Records

In 1990 singer Bobby McFerrin and pianist Chick Corea teamed up for six concerts that were as much about performance art and wacky comedy as about music; to many people's surprise Corea proved to be as humorous as McFerrin. This CD features musical highlights from a pair of the concerts. Unfortunately without seeing the performers in person, one is not always sure what the audience is laughing at, particularly during the first three selections. Still there are some remarkable moments, primarily from McFerrin who shows that he can switch effortlessly from soaring falsetto to intense basslines; his ideas on "Blue Bossa" are quite impressive. Corea is heard more often as an accompanist than as an equal partner so McFerrin often steals the show on this interesting but not essential release. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
From
CD€19.49

Jazz - Released January 1, 1990 | Parlophone Catalogue

After having a surprise hit in "Don't Worry, Be Happy" in 1988, singer Bobby McFerrin seemed to run away from success in embarrassment. He did not record as a leader for two years, and many of his subsequent projects were more in classical music than in jazz or pop. He formed the a cappella Voicestra, which seemed to miss the point, which is that he could do all the voices himself without overdubbing. This well-meaning CD, which uses the Voicestra on a few cuts plus his father, opera singer Robert McFerrin, Sr., on "Discipline," suffers from consistently dull material; none of the songs or performances are the least bit memorable. Clearly McFerrin's career was drifting at this point and, even by the late '90s, had not regained its momentum in the jazz world. In the case of Bobby McFerrin, more has always been less, and this CD has a bit too much waste. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
From
CD€19.49

Vocal Jazz - Released January 1, 1986 | Blue Note Records

Bobby McFerrin is heard in prime form throughout this date, which was the follow-up to his classic The Voice. A few of the numbers are taken unaccompanied, and these include memorable renditions of "Thinkin' About Your Body," "I Hear Music," and "Mañana Iguana." Pianist Herbie Hancock duets with McFerrin on "Turtle Shoes"; "Another Night in Tunisia" (taken from the Manhattan Transfer's Vocalese album) features McFerrin with the vocal quartet and Jon Hendricks; soprano saxophonist Wayne Shorter interacts with the vocalist on "Walkin'"; and an eccentric "Beverly Hills Blues" has "assistance" from comedian Robin Williams. A continually intriguing release with plenty of wit from the innovative singer. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
From
CD€12.49

Jazz - Released January 1, 1997 | EMI Gold

From
CD€9.99

Pop - Released May 18, 2020 | BBM3

From
CD€8.99

Jazz - Released April 15, 2020 | Lo-Light Records

From
CD€13.99

Vocal Music (Secular and Sacred) - Released March 29, 2010 | Wrasse Records Ltd. (UK)

Bobby McFerrin has always been a wildly restless talent, continually looking to develop fresh ideas for the human voice and place it in -- sometimes wildly -- different contexts from simple folk and pop songs to improvisational settings to strident compositional frameworks. His productions include duet records with instrumentalists Chick Corea and Yo-Yo Ma, as well as the creation of a virtual a cappella choir from his own vocal overdubs. All of this said, there has always been “something missing” from his recorded works that shows itself in concert, outside recording studio confines. On VOCAbuLarieS he seems to have found it. This is the work that anyone remotely interested in McFerrin needs to hear. Collaborating with composer, arranger, and conductor Roger Treece over seven years, McFerrin’s been given a foil who not only understands his previous output, but can focus his ideas and take them to the next developmental peak. The pair employed over 50 vocalists from different genres and nations to create a virtual choir in the studio. According to a press release, they cut over 1,400 vocal tracks. The music here is “fusion” in the most seamless and beautiful sense of the word: classical, pop, soul, Middle Eastern, African, and Eastern European vocal traditions all move together, and encounter one another head-on. They meld into a whole where the seams show, but are elegantly aurally tailored to create something entirely new -- even if the material always isn’t. Three selections here come from the controversially beautiful Medicine Music album, from 1996. But the versions here are radically different than the originals; the voices, rhythms, textures, and even ambiences of these voices have a more muscular quality, much more forceful and complex while simultaneously being more "listenable." The opener, “Baby,” provides proof. In the original it was a simple folk song, a lullaby with African roots; here is it a harmonically challenging, intricate labyrinth where 22 singers accompany McFerrin as well as a rhythm section. ”Wailers” is a pulsing chant with Middle Eastern, African, and Eastern European harmonies woven together by singers who include Sussan Deyhim, Luciana Souza, and Janis Siegel. ”He Ran to the Train” combines -- in a wholly new way -- two tracks from Medicine Music in an explosively knotty, compellingly emotional call-and-response piece that is as rhythmically complex as it is harmonically. The set closes with “Brief Eternity,” a new piece of modern sacred music that evokes everything from Gregorian chant and polyphony to John Tavener and Arvo Pärt. VOCAbuLarieS is easily McFerrin’s finest moment on record as well as his most ambitious, and should win him some new fans even among cynics. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
From
CD€6.99

Pop - Released January 1, 2011 | Proomnia records