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Rock - Released April 25, 2005 | Nuclear Blast

Paradigm: an outstandingly clear example or archetype. Entropy: the degree of disorder or uncertainty in a system. Paradigm in Entropy: perfect chaos? Ah, who knows. The sober truth about Bleed the Sky's pompously named debut is that these SoCal natives don't seem to know what they want to be when they grow up. On the one hand, representative tracks like "Minion," "Kill Tank," and "Borrelia Mass," with their down-tuned riffs, processed melodic choruses, and machine-like drum patterns, suggest the group want to emulate Fear Factory by way of Meshuggah; on the other hand, inconsistent cuts like "Skin un Skin" (featuring a great melodic bridge, but nothing else), "The Martyr" (containing an Incubus-like commercial display), and the wince inducing "Leverage" (which sounds like Korn's Jonathan Davis' being molested by Burton C. Bell and company), see them wallowing in the cesspool of nu-metal predictability. And therein lies the crux of Bleed the Sky's dilemma: discerning metalheads will likely dismiss them with barely one listen, while nu-metal fans drawn by the group's musical and visual presentation (which includes all of the right haircuts, piercings, and a mostly inaudible, and probably unnecessary DJ) will think the brief notions of hardcore and death metal contained here are positively revolutionary. Which is to say that this flawed but bold debut could very well slip right through the stylistic cracks separating nu-metal and its apparent early 2000s replacement, the more purist-grounded New Wave of American Heavy Metal. In any case, Bleed the Sky's obvious versatility and commendable experimental nature suggest that they need only compile a little more experience in order to harness their schizophrenic songwriting impulses, but, as it stands, Paradigm in Entropy's description is only half accurate. © Eduardo Rivadavia /TiVo
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Metal - Released January 17, 2020 | Art is War Records LLC

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Metal - Released January 6, 2020 | Art is War Records LLC

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Metal - Released October 30, 2020 | Intercept Music

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Metal - Released December 23, 2019 | Art is War Records LLC

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Rock - Released June 13, 2008 | Nuclear Blast

Most people in the arts who move from Oklahoma to Southern California end up staying in So-Cal permanently. The late jazz trumpeter Chet Baker, an Oklahoma native, made Los Angeles his new home and never looked back; veteran R&B critic Steven Ivory, originally from Oklahoma City, moved to L.A. in the 1970s and stayed there. But there are exceptions to that rule, including Bleed the Sky, who moved from Oklahoma City to Orange County, CA, in 2005 but returned to Oklahoma City in 2007 -- the year in which they recorded Murder the Dance. Bleed the Sky have had their share of lineup changes, and on this 63-minute CD, the lineup consists of Noah Robinson on lead vocals, Justin Warrick and Rob Thornton on guitar, Ryan Clark on bass, and Austin D'Amond on drums; Robinson and D'Amond are the only ones remaining from Bleed the Sky's original 2003 lineup. Stylistically, there is only one word to describe Murder the Dance: metalcore. That means plenty of breakdowns, vicious bombast, angry lyrics, and Robinson offering the type of throat-shredding, tortured screaming that metalcore is known for. Occasionally, there are some cleans vocals, but not to the point of pushing Murder the Dance into screamo territory; the vast majority of the vocals are extreme vocals rather than clean vocals. So metalcore purists shouldn't have a problem with this 63-minute CD -- at least not a stylistic problem. The disc's greatest shortcoming is the fact that the material is unremarkable. Murder the Dance isn't a bad album or an incompetent album, but tracks like "The Sleeping Beauty" and "Knife Fight in a Phone Booth" simply aren't very memorable -- and there is little that makes Bleed the Sky stand out in the ultra-crowded metalcore/hardcore field. © Alex Henderson /TiVo
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Metal - Released March 26, 2019 | Bleed the Sky

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Rock - Released June 13, 2008 | Massacre Records

Most people in the arts who move from Oklahoma to Southern California end up staying in So-Cal permanently. The late jazz trumpeter Chet Baker, an Oklahoma native, made Los Angeles his new home and never looked back; veteran R&B critic Steven Ivory, originally from Oklahoma City, moved to L.A. in the 1970s and stayed there. But there are exceptions to that rule, including Bleed the Sky, who moved from Oklahoma City to Orange County, CA, in 2005 but returned to Oklahoma City in 2007 -- the year in which they recorded Murder the Dance. Bleed the Sky have had their share of lineup changes, and on this 63-minute CD, the lineup consists of Noah Robinson on lead vocals, Justin Warrick and Rob Thornton on guitar, Ryan Clark on bass, and Austin D'Amond on drums; Robinson and D'Amond are the only ones remaining from Bleed the Sky's original 2003 lineup. Stylistically, there is only one word to describe Murder the Dance: metalcore. That means plenty of breakdowns, vicious bombast, angry lyrics, and Robinson offering the type of throat-shredding, tortured screaming that metalcore is known for. Occasionally, there are some cleans vocals, but not to the point of pushing Murder the Dance into screamo territory; the vast majority of the vocals are extreme vocals rather than clean vocals. So metalcore purists shouldn't have a problem with this 63-minute CD -- at least not a stylistic problem. The disc's greatest shortcoming is the fact that the material is unremarkable. Murder the Dance isn't a bad album or an incompetent album, but tracks like "The Sleeping Beauty" and "Knife Fight in a Phone Booth" simply aren't very memorable -- and there is little that makes Bleed the Sky stand out in the ultra-crowded metalcore/hardcore field. © Alex Henderson /TiVo