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Classical - Released September 7, 2009 | Warner Classics

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Choc de Classica
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Classical - Released July 11, 2011 | Warner Classics

Booklet Distinctions Choc de Classica
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Classical - Released April 1, 1997 | Warner Classics

Distinctions Gramophone Record of the Year
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Classical - Released April 16, 2021 | LSO Live

Hi-Res Booklet
Sir Antonio Pappano leads the London Symphony Orchestra in a pair of symphonies by Ralph Vaughan Williams that span the build-up and aftermath of the Second World War. Throughout the Fourth Symphony Vaughan Williams channels tension and power through the music in amongst moments of light and clarity. It evokes a sense of hardship and persistence, perhaps suggesting the ever-present threat of war in the 1930s. Written in 1947, the composer's Sixth Symphony also seems to reflect the hardships and devastation wrought by World War II. Melancholic in some movements, ferocious in others. © LSO Live
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Classical - Released November 28, 1999 | Warner Classics

Antonio Pappano leads a sensuous and dramatically taut reading of Werther on EMI's all-star release. Werther is one of the most intimate and interior of operas, and Pappano successfully captures the mood of the protagonist's turmoil that constitutes its real drama. The leads are in strong voice and make dramatic impressions as the victims of passion in whose face they feel helpless. Roberto Alagna's Werther is consumed with love and anguish, and he sings with a ringing, heroic tone. Angela Gheorghiu's Charlotte is capable of expressing the fire that finally ignites in the third act, and her tone is pure and true, but she sounds a little mature for a 20 year old and misses the girlishness that makes Charlotte's predicament so poignant. In Werther's death scene, both are hugely moving. Thomas Hampson's voice is rich and dark, and he ably conveys the complexity of Albert's emotions. In a bit of luxury casting, Patricia Petibon sparkles as the adolescent Sophie. The smaller roles are well taken, and the singers make the most of their vignettes. The London Symphony responds with sensitivity to Pappano's fluid tempi and plays with gorgeous tone. EMI's sound is ideal -- realistically present, with excellent balance. © TiVo
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Classical - Released February 5, 2007 | Warner Classics

If you're caught in a tight spot and desperately need a set of Pyotr Il'yich Tchaikovsky's last three symphonies, then this double-disc from EMI may work as a quick fix. But if you need an exceptional recording of these works to last longer than one hearing (say, for the rest of your life), then skip this live twofer altogether, because its mediocre sound quality is sure to disappoint, and the performances, while decent, offer little compensation for the defects. In the best of times, one must be wary of EMI's reproduction because the tone quality can range from clear to muted to muffled, and certain audio "gremlins" can be obstacles to enjoyment. On this all-digital set by Antonio Pappano and the Orchestra of Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia, the sound is afflicted by electronic distortion in several spots, and the volume at various points throughout seems unnaturally manipulated in mixing, making the orchestra's true dynamics hard discern. Add to this the unavoidable audience noises and what seems like someone humming along in soft spots and the package seems even less desirable. Yet these flaws would matter less if Pappano and his ensemble had something fresh to offer or if the interpretations weren't so close to standard-issue performances. But these readings sound like any major orchestra's recordings from the modern era, so it makes little sense to get this set when others of similar musical quality -- and some also include the underrated symphonies No. 1, No. 2, and No. 3 -- offer much better sound and value. © TiVo