Your basket is empty

Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

From
CD€14.49

Soul/Funk/R&B - Released January 1, 2001 | J Records

This is as soulful as soul gets. Angie Stone spent the first chapter of her career firmly in the hip-hop scene. A member of The Sequence from 1979 and lead vocalist for Vertical Hold from 1993, it wasn’t until 1999 that Angie Stone released her debut solo album to widespread critical acclaim. With her follow-up Mahogany Soul (2001), Stone cements her place as one of the leading figures of Neo Soul as well as being one of the most important voices of the 21st century female African-American experience. The album harks back to R&B’s glorious past, evoking Curtis Mayfield and Marvin Gaye, without ever losing its contemporary edge, and here she collaborates with Alicia Keys, Calvin, Raphael Saadiq and Musiq Soulchild. The songs remain rooted in sophisticated, mature and often funky soul, and Stone’s effervescent personality consistently shines through, revealing her candor, swagger and humour. The result is an album that functions as a shining example of Nu Soul, without ever being restricted by its rules. A confident musical statement, Mahogany Soul remains to this day Angie Stone’s masterpiece. © Jack Butler/Qobuz
From
CD€44.99

Soul - Released September 18, 2012 | BRM - Peace Bisquit

From
CD€14.99

R&B - Released January 1, 2007 | Stax

The re-launched Stax label is an appropriate home for neo-soulster Angie Stone. Her 2007 album The Art of Love & War nods to classic styles, blending funk, soul, balladry, and R&B in one tasty package. The appearance of soul great Betty Wright on the album highlight "Baby" only strengthens the retro vibe. Yet The Art of Love & War is contemporary through and through. Shimmering with a modern, digital production sheen, the album is clearly steeped in urban contemporary R&B, more lush and languid than stripped down and raw. Stone is no mere puppet of the past (and apparently neither is the revamped Stax): her voice, delivery, and feel are all her own, whether on butter-smooth love songs ("Make It Last") or hard-swinging groovers ("Play wit It"). © TiVo
From
CD€14.49

R&B - Released June 28, 2004 | J Records

From
CD€7.99

Soul - Released October 8, 1999 | BRM - Peace Bisquit

From
CD€8.99

Soul - Released July 12, 2019 | Cleopatra Records

In 2016, Angie Stone gifted us her own cover album with Covered In Soul, in which she performed songs from the likes of Stevie Wonder, Carole King, Phil Collins, Bob Marley, etc. Three years later, Stone, who remains a pioneer of nu-soul – along with her compatriots Erykah Badu, Maxwell and her ex, D’Angelo – goes back to the roots of her sensual R&B with a new album, Full Circle. Her approach is rather conventional, both in production and singing. But thanks to her eminently recognisable voice, Angie Stone remains a blue-chip artist for velvety groove. © Clotilde Maréchal/Qobuz
From
CD€9.99

Soul - Released August 5, 2016 | Goldenlane Records

Soul/Funk/R&B - Released June 21, 2005 | J Records

Download not available
Angie Stone came to prominence at a time when neo-soul divas were exploding faster than pop rocks. With the chart onslaught of Jill Scott, Mary J. Blige, and Macy Gray, it was easy for Stone to get lost in the undertow of media hype surrounding the movement. But quietly and evenhandedly she amassed a three-record set of smooth neo-soul and contemporary R&B numbers that rival and sometimes best the output of her contemporaries. So it seems premature in a five-year career to have a best-of compilation out, but these 15 selections (featuring a couple newly minted tunes mixed in for good measure and buyer incentive) add up to a most satisfying listening experience. With her vocal delivery, Stone belts tunes out better than most (save for Scott, but comparing vocal stylings between the two is comparing apples and oranges), and covers some of soul music's more obscure classics, making them her own with reverence and ease. And it seems that with each new release she becomes more focused and distinct from her contemporaries, and as a result turns out one of the better greatest-hits compilations from this era. It'll be interesting to see the direction Angie Stone travels next. © Rob Theakston /TiVo
From
CD€14.49

Soul/Funk/R&B - Released June 21, 2005 | J Records

Angie Stone came to prominence at a time when neo-soul divas were exploding faster than pop rocks. With the chart onslaught of Jill Scott, Mary J. Blige, and Macy Gray, it was easy for Stone to get lost in the undertow of media hype surrounding the movement. But quietly and evenhandedly she amassed a three-record set of smooth neo-soul and contemporary R&B numbers that rival and sometimes best the output of her contemporaries. So it seems premature in a five-year career to have a best-of compilation out, but these 15 selections (featuring a couple newly minted tunes mixed in for good measure and buyer incentive) add up to a most satisfying listening experience. With her vocal delivery, Stone belts tunes out better than most (save for Scott, but comparing vocal stylings between the two is comparing apples and oranges), and covers some of soul music's more obscure classics, making them her own with reverence and ease. And it seems that with each new release she becomes more focused and distinct from her contemporaries, and as a result turns out one of the better greatest-hits compilations from this era. It'll be interesting to see the direction Angie Stone travels next. © Rob Theakston /TiVo
From
CD€2.99

Soul/Funk/R&B - Released June 21, 2004 | J Records

From
CD€14.99

R&B - Released January 1, 2009 | Stax

On her second album for Concord’s Stax imprint (and fifth overall), Angie Stone delves deeper into funk and hip-hop than on her previous outings. Her last offering, The Art of Love & War, was a critical and commercial triumph for the vastly underrated vocalist, and topped the Billboard chart. With a slew of producers including Sly Williams, Willie “Chuck” Shivers, Karrim King and Fitzroy Reid, Steven “Supe” White, Jonathan Richmond, Jazze Pha, and Stone herself, these dozen tracks continue to reveal her versatility as a vocalist and recording artist; she can sing whatever it is she wants to with equal verve, authenticity, and flair. Despite the slicker and more diverse sounds on Unexpected, the soul quotient is high, even if this isn’t strictly a neo-soul album. The new beat consciousness reveals itself most on the title track, which is hard funk at its 2009 best. Cuts such as “Free” might have come right out of the 1990s with their use of careening synths, shimmering hip-hop beats, and colliding loops. But the melody is solid, its chorus and refrain catchy. “I Found a Keeper” is another; its production, arrangement, and structure actually feel like it was recorded in the 1990s -- and is at least reminiscent in spirit to material by the trio MoKenStef. But these are not complaints. Stone’s voice is so strident and drenched in soul that even the harpsichord sound on the latter track can’t overpower it. The one complaint is the utterly unnecessary use of Auto-Tune on a beautiful song like “Tell Me” -- the synths and dancefloor beats are one thing, but the inclusion of this device just feels plain alien on this track. For fans worried that Stone abandoned her old-school sound completely, they needn’t worry. The first single, “I Ain’t Hearin’ You,” is drenched in neo-soul grooves, as are “Think Sometimes,” “I Don’t Care,” and the gorgeous ballads “All Over Your Body” and “Why Is It.” If one goes back to Angie Stone’s debut album, Black Diamond, and follows the progression of her sound, it will be obvious that there has been a continued and restless path of growth and experimentation. Unexpected simply feels like a leap more than a step. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
From
CD€9.99

Soul - Released November 6, 2015 | Shanachie

From
CD€14.49

R&B - Released June 21, 2005 | J Records

Angie Stone came to prominence at a time when neo-soul divas were exploding faster than pop rocks. With the chart onslaught of Jill Scott, Mary J. Blige, and Macy Gray, it was easy for Stone to get lost in the undertow of media hype surrounding the movement. But quietly and evenhandedly she amassed a three-record set of smooth neo-soul and contemporary R&B numbers that rival and sometimes best the output of her contemporaries. So it seems premature in a five-year career to have a best-of compilation out, but these 15 selections (featuring a couple newly minted tunes mixed in for good measure and buyer incentive) add up to a most satisfying listening experience. With her vocal delivery, Stone belts tunes out better than most (save for Scott, but comparing vocal stylings between the two is comparing apples and oranges), and covers some of soul music's more obscure classics, making them her own with reverence and ease. And it seems that with each new release she becomes more focused and distinct from her contemporaries, and as a result turns out one of the better greatest-hits compilations from this era. It'll be interesting to see the direction Angie Stone travels next. © Rob Theakston /TiVo
From
HI-RES€14.49
CD€9.99

Soul - Released March 13, 2019 | Cleopatra Records

Hi-Res
From
CD€5.99

Soul - Released June 5, 2020 | BRM - Peace Bisquit

From
CD€5.99

Soul - Released May 29, 2020 | BRM - Peace Bisquit

From
CD€8.99

Soul - Released June 26, 2020 | BRM - Peace Bisquit

From
CD€2.29

R&B - Released August 28, 2012 | Saguaro Road Records

From
CD€14.49

Electronic - Released March 28, 2006 | J Records

From
CD€1.99

R&B - Released January 1, 2007 | Stax