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Pop - Released January 1, 2011 | Universal-Island Records Ltd.

Distinctions 3F de Télérama - Sélection Les Inrocks
The qualities of a vocal genius don't always become clear when she's singing classic material. Often as not, her abilities to both personalize and transcend a lifeless song with a stellar performance reveal the character behind the singer. Both Billie Holiday and Otis Redding excelled no matter what they were recording, whether it was a timeless standard or a studio throwaway. This collection of Amy Winehouse material, released to coincide with the first Christmas season after her death in July 2011, does not contain a strong set of material. Besides the covers, which are well chosen, originals "Between the Cheats" and "Best Friends, Right?" and "Half Time" should not have survived the cut if Winehouse had been around to wield her veto power. But if the songwriting isn’t strong enough to make listeners confuse this with a Back to Black follow-up, the productions and performances are up to her high caliber. Salaam Remi and Mark Ronson handled virtually all of the production work, while these performances by Winehouse are just as strong as she showed on Frank and Back to Black. Thanks to the work of Remi and Ronson, the album is also strikingly uniform; only the songwriting and prevalence of covers or "original versions" reveal that this is a posthumous collection. Ronson's production on "Will You Still Love Me Tomorrow?" is towering, although he injects a little more drama into his chart than the song can support, while a skittering version of "The Girl from Ipanema" (nearly drum’n’bass at points) nearly reinvents a tired classic. The recordings stretch from the beginning of her professional career to close to the end, but Winehouse is virtually always in strong voice; only on her Tony Bennett duet, “Body and Soul,” does she veer into self-parody. © John Bush /TiVo
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R&B - Released October 27, 2006 | Universal-Island Records Ltd.

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
With her tragic early death (though hardly surprising given Amy Winehouse's lifestyle) a truly unique voice of contemporary soul stopped singing on July 23, 2011. She has a voice that should never be overshadowed either by her chaotic life covering the pages of British tabloids, or by her struggles with alcohol and drugs, or even the hundreds of videos of failed concerts on YouTube... When the Winehouse phenomenon exploded with this second album, the sublime Back To Black being far superior to her first record Frank, soul music was going through a slump with hollow, syrupy R&B singers and sanitized productions flooding the scene. Few people tried to develop the path established by Aretha Franklin, Ann Peebles, Nina Simone, Tina Turner, Dinah Washington and Marlena Shaw. But then along came Amy Winehouse, with her incredible timbre, her genuine songs (which she wrote herself, unlike 90% of her peers), her vintage-tinged productions (which were never passé) and brass-filled instrumentation. To top it all off, even her image was distinctive: 50’s beehive, biker tattoos and a cheeky attitude. Back To Black topped the charts for months all over the world, and it's still a real masterpiece of soul music and R&B. When critical opinion meets popular opinion – something relatively rare that’s worth underlining - the enjoyment is only tenfold. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Film Soundtracks - Released October 30, 2015 | Universal-Island Records Ltd.

Hi-Res Distinctions Grammy Awards
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R&B - Released January 1, 2007 | Universal-Island Records Ltd.

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
The story of Back to Black is one in which celebrity and the potential of commercial success threaten to ruin Amy Winehouse, since the same insouciance and playfulness that made her sound so special when she debuted could easily have been whitewashed right out of existence for this breakout record. (That fact may help to explain why fans were so scared by press allegations that Winehouse had deliberately lost weight in order to present a slimmer appearance.) Although Back to Black does see her deserting jazz and wholly embracing contemporary R&B, all the best parts of her musical character emerge intact, and actually, are all the better for the transformation from jazz vocalist to soul siren. With producer Salaam Remi returning from Frank, plus the welcome addition of Mark Ronson (fresh off successes producing for Christina Aguilera and Robbie Williams), Back to Black has a similar sound to Frank but much more flair and spark to it. Winehouse was inspired by girl group soul of the '60s, and fortunately Ronson and Remi are two of the most facile and organic R&B producers active. (They certainly know how to evoke the era too; Remi's "Tears Dry on Their Own" is a sparkling homage to the Motown chestnut "Ain't No Mountain High Enough," and Ronson summons a host of Brill Building touchstones on his tracks.) As before, Winehouse writes all of the songs from her experiences, most of which involve the occasionally riotous and often bittersweet vagaries of love. Also in similar fashion to Frank, her eye for details and her way of relating them are delightful. She states her case against "Rehab" on the knockout first single with some great lines: "They tried to make me go to rehab I won't go go go, I'd rather be at home with Ray" (Charles, that is). As often as not, though, the songs on Back to Black are universal, songs that anyone, even Joss Stone, could take to the top of the charts, such as "Love Is a Losing Game" or the title song ("We only said good bye with words, I died a hundred times/You go back to her, and I go back to black"). © John Bush /TiVo
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R&B - Released January 1, 2006 | Universal-Island Records Ltd.

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
The story of Back to Black is one in which celebrity and the potential of commercial success threaten to ruin Amy Winehouse, since the same insouciance and playfulness that made her sound so special when she debuted could easily have been whitewashed right out of existence for this breakout record. (That fact may help to explain why fans were so scared by press allegations that Winehouse had deliberately lost weight in order to present a slimmer appearance.) Although Back to Black does see her deserting jazz and wholly embracing contemporary R&B, all the best parts of her musical character emerge intact, and actually, are all the better for the transformation from jazz vocalist to soul siren. With producer Salaam Remi returning from Frank, plus the welcome addition of Mark Ronson (fresh off successes producing for Christina Aguilera and Robbie Williams), Back to Black has a similar sound to Frank but much more flair and spark to it. Winehouse was inspired by girl group soul of the '60s, and fortunately Ronson and Remi are two of the most facile and organic R&B producers active. (They certainly know how to evoke the era too; Remi's "Tears Dry on Their Own" is a sparkling homage to the Motown chestnut "Ain't No Mountain High Enough," and Ronson summons a host of Brill Building touchstones on his tracks.) As before, Winehouse writes all of the songs from her experiences, most of which involve the occasionally riotous and often bittersweet vagaries of love. Also in similar fashion to Frank, her eye for details and her way of relating them are delightful. She states her case against "Rehab" on the knockout first single with some great lines: "They tried to make me go to rehab I won't go go go, I'd rather be at home with Ray" (Charles, that is). As often as not, though, the songs on Back to Black are universal, songs that anyone, even Joss Stone, could take to the top of the charts, such as "Love Is a Losing Game" or the title song ("We only said good bye with words, I died a hundred times/You go back to her, and I go back to black"). © John Bush /TiVo
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Pop - Released May 7, 2021 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

Ten years after Amy Winehouse's tragic and untimely death, the BBC is unearthing an impressive body of live recordings made by a singer who was unique among contemporary soul artists. This is actually a much-augmented version of At the BBC, which originally came out in 2012 with 24 tracks. This 2021 version of At the BBC packs 38 tracks (from 2004-2009) and over two hours of music: proof of this artist's power, as well as a document of her sometimes-ambiguous relationship with the scene. Here you can find Winehouse's performances on shows hosted by Jo Whiley, Jools Holland, and the late Pete Mitchell, who were always great champions of hers. On top of that, we have concerts recorded by UK radio (two with the Modfather, Paul Weller, making a guest appearance), as well as recordings of more intimate shows. In front of an audience, Amy would sometimes force her singing, as if tempted to go in for vocal pyrotechnics. But everything here is controlled and classy, as when she revisits standards like Lullaby of Birdland and I Should Care, or on a raw, powerful version of Rehab with Mitchell in 2006..During the 2000s, women soul singers were few and far between, and fewer still were those who really tried to develop and build on the eternal soul music laid down by Aretha Franklin, Ann Peebles, Nina Simone, Tina Turner, Dinah Washington and Marlena Shaw. As At the BBC reminds us, Amy Winehouse had a lithe, strong voice, real songs (which she wrote herself, unlike most of her peers), production values that felt vintage (but never old-fashioned), and a superb brass section. These unique traits all shine on the final part of this 2021 re-release of At the BBC with a 2007 concert at London's Porchester Hall, ending with a spicy cover of Monkey Man by Toots and the Maytals, which the Specials – adored by Winehouse – also revisited on their debut album. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Pop - Released February 26, 2021 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

This 2007 concert, twice postponed, took place at London's Shepherd's Bush Empire, and reminds us of the singer's flamboyant energy. This live recording was entitled I Told You I Was Trouble, as Amy Winehouse was unpredictable and many of her appearances were punctuated by incidents and accompanied by permanent chaos. This is fortunately not the case for this recording where we find brilliant performances of such worldwide hits as Rehab or Back to Black, as well as a cover of Valerie by the Zutons, recorded by the star with producer Mark Ronson on his album Version, released in 2007. Of the sixteen tracks that make up this live record, note three other covers, Doo Wop (That Thing) by Lauryn Hill, which Amy Winehouse follows up with her very own He Can Only Hold Her, and two covers of numbers by the legendary ska group led by the no-less-legendary Jerry Dammers: the Specials. Winehouse offers a beautiful version of Hey Little Rich Girl and chooses to end her concert with a perfectly festive, very spirited version of their Monkey Man... This London performance has lost nothing of its freshness and immortalises an hour from the life of this exceptional artist with an exceptional voice and unforgettable charisma. Unfortunately she passed away in 2011 at the age of twenty-seven, joining the likes of Brian Jones, Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin, Jim Morrison and Kurt Cobain in the 27 Club... But the one they called “Trouble” has left some of her very best here for us to hold onto forever. © Yan Céh/Qobuz
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R&B - Released October 20, 2003 | Universal-Island Records Ltd.

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R&B - Released January 1, 2008 | Universal-Island Records Ltd.

If a series of unfortunate comparisons (like the ones to follow) cause listeners to equate British vocalist Amy Winehouse with Macy Gray, it's only natural. Both come on like a hybrid of Billie Holiday and Lauryn Hill who's had a tipple and then attempted one more late-night set at a supper club than they should have. Despite her boozy persona and loose-limbed delivery, though, Winehouse is an excellent vocalist possessing both power and subtlety, the latter an increasingly rare commodity among contemporary female vocalists (whether jazz or R&B). What lifts her above Macy Gray is the fact that her music and her career haven't been marketed within an inch of their life. Instead of Gray's stale studio accompaniments, Winehouse has talented musicians playing loose charts behind her with room for a few solos. Instead of a series of vocal mellifluities programmed to digital perfection, Winehouse's record has the feeling of being allowed to grow on its own -- without being meddled with and fussed over (and losing its soul in the process). Simply hearing Winehouse vamp for a few minutes over some Brazilian guitar lines on "You Sent Me Flying" is a rare and immense pleasure. Also, like Nellie McKay (but unlike nearly all of her contemporaries), Winehouse songs like "Fuck Me Pumps," "Take the Box," and "I Heard Love Is Blind" cast a cool, critical gaze over the music scene, over the dating scene, and even over the singer herself. With "In My Bed," she even proves she can do a commercial R&B production, and a club version of "Moody's Mood for Love" not only solidifies her jazz credentials but proves she can survive in the age of Massive Attack. © John Bush /TiVo
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Film Soundtracks - Released October 30, 2015 | Universal-Island Records Ltd.

The soundtrack to the Asif Kapadia documentary dedicated to Amy Winehouse offers two types of pieces to its listeners. First, we have the late British soul sister’s biggest songs in alternate versions (e.g. Tears Dry On Their Own, Back To Black, and Love Is A Losing Game, in particular), but also some rare live sessions, demos of Stronger Than Me, What Is It About Men, and Rehab, amongst others. There are plenty of nuggets here to delight fans of the London singer, who died tragically in the summer of 2011. This soundtrack also includes the original score, written specifically for Amy, by the Brazilian composer Antônio Pinto. Pinto previously worked with Kapadia on their collaborative biopic of Ayrton Senna.
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Pop - Released November 20, 2020 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

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R&B - Released July 3, 2015 | Universal-Island Records Ltd.

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R&B - Released July 3, 2015 | Universal-Island Records Ltd.

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R&B - Released July 3, 2015 | Universal-Island Records Ltd.

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R&B - Released October 20, 2003 | Universal-Island Records Ltd.

If a series of unfortunate comparisons (like the ones to follow) cause listeners to equate British vocalist Amy Winehouse with Macy Gray, it's only natural. Both come on like a hybrid of Billie Holiday and Lauryn Hill who's had a tipple and then attempted one more late-night set at a supper club than they should have. Despite her boozy persona and loose-limbed delivery, though, Winehouse is an excellent vocalist possessing both power and subtlety, the latter an increasingly rare commodity among contemporary female vocalists (whether jazz or R&B). What lifts her above Macy Gray is the fact that her music and her career haven't been marketed within an inch of their life. Instead of Gray's stale studio accompaniments, Winehouse has talented musicians playing loose charts behind her with room for a few solos. Instead of a series of vocal mellifluities programmed to digital perfection, Winehouse's record has the feeling of being allowed to grow on its own -- without being meddled with and fussed over (and losing its soul in the process). Simply hearing Winehouse vamp for a few minutes over some Brazilian guitar lines on "You Sent Me Flying" is a rare and immense pleasure. Also, like Nellie McKay (but unlike nearly all of her contemporaries), Winehouse songs like "Fuck Me Pumps," "Take the Box," and "I Heard Love Is Blind" cast a cool, critical gaze over the music scene, over the dating scene, and even over the singer herself. With "In My Bed," she even proves she can do a commercial R&B production, and a club version of "Moody's Mood for Love" not only solidifies her jazz credentials but proves she can survive in the age of Massive Attack. © John Bush /TiVo
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R&B - Released October 27, 2006 | Universal-Island Records Ltd.

The story of Back to Black is one in which celebrity and the potential of commercial success threaten to ruin Amy Winehouse, since the same insouciance and playfulness that made her sound so special when she debuted could easily have been whitewashed right out of existence for this breakout record. (That fact may help to explain why fans were so scared by press allegations that Winehouse had deliberately lost weight in order to present a slimmer appearance.) Although Back to Black does see her deserting jazz and wholly embracing contemporary R&B, all the best parts of her musical character emerge intact, and actually, are all the better for the transformation from jazz vocalist to soul siren. With producer Salaam Remi returning from Frank, plus the welcome addition of Mark Ronson (fresh off successes producing for Christina Aguilera and Robbie Williams), Back to Black has a similar sound to Frank but much more flair and spark to it. Winehouse was inspired by girl group soul of the '60s, and fortunately Ronson and Remi are two of the most facile and organic R&B producers active. (They certainly know how to evoke the era too; Remi's "Tears Dry on Their Own" is a sparkling homage to the Motown chestnut "Ain't No Mountain High Enough," and Ronson summons a host of Brill Building touchstones on his tracks.) As before, Winehouse writes all of the songs from her experiences, most of which involve the occasionally riotous and often bittersweet vagaries of love. Also in similar fashion to Frank, her eye for details and her way of relating them are delightful. She states her case against "Rehab" on the knockout first single with some great lines: "They tried to make me go to rehab I won't go go go, I'd rather be at home with Ray" (Charles, that is). As often as not, though, the songs on Back to Black are universal, songs that anyone, even Joss Stone, could take to the top of the charts, such as "Love Is a Losing Game" or the title song ("We only said good bye with words, I died a hundred times/You go back to her, and I go back to black"). © John Bush /TiVo
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R&B - Released July 3, 2015 | Universal-Island Records Ltd.

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R&B - Released October 20, 2003 | Universal-Island Records Ltd.

If a series of unfortunate comparisons (like the ones to follow) cause listeners to equate British vocalist Amy Winehouse with Macy Gray, it's only natural. Both come on like a hybrid of Billie Holiday and Lauryn Hill who's had a tipple and then attempted one more late-night set at a supper club than they should have. Despite her boozy persona and loose-limbed delivery, though, Winehouse is an excellent vocalist possessing both power and subtlety, the latter an increasingly rare commodity among contemporary female vocalists (whether jazz or R&B). What lifts her above Macy Gray is the fact that her music and her career haven't been marketed within an inch of their life. Instead of Gray's stale studio accompaniments, Winehouse has talented musicians playing loose charts behind her with room for a few solos. Instead of a series of vocal mellifluities programmed to digital perfection, Winehouse's record has the feeling of being allowed to grow on its own -- without being meddled with and fussed over (and losing its soul in the process). Simply hearing Winehouse vamp for a few minutes over some Brazilian guitar lines on "You Sent Me Flying" is a rare and immense pleasure. Also, like Nellie McKay (but unlike nearly all of her contemporaries), Winehouse songs like "Fuck Me Pumps," "Take the Box," and "I Heard Love Is Blind" cast a cool, critical gaze over the music scene, over the dating scene, and even over the singer herself. With "In My Bed," she even proves she can do a commercial R&B production, and a club version of "Moody's Mood for Love" not only solidifies her jazz credentials but proves she can survive in the age of Massive Attack. © John Bush /TiVo
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Pop - Released January 1, 2007 | Universal-Island Records Ltd.

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R&B - Released January 1, 2007 | Island Records (The Island Def Jam Music Group / Universal Music)

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Amy Winehouse in the magazine
  • Amy, the O.S.T
    Amy, the O.S.T The rarities from the O.S.T of the documentary, Amy, show the late British soul legend in a wholly new light...