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Film Soundtracks - Released April 26, 2019 | Hollywood Records

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Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 2015 | Geffen

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Film Soundtracks - Released April 27, 2018 | Hollywood Records

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Following his early 2010s work on the first Captain America and Avengers films, composer Alan Silvestri returned to the Marvel universe for 2018's blockbuster Avengers: Infinity War. Landing in the Top 100 on the Billboard 200 upon release, the Avengers: Infinity War original motion picture soundtrack featured an epic, Thanos-sized score to pair with the non-stop intergalactic action of the film (with song titles that gave away nothing of the major plot twists). © Neil Z. Yeung /TiVo
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Film Soundtracks - Released August 2, 1994 | Epic Soundtrax

Forrest Gump was a sugar lump of a movie, a fact driven home by this album containing Alan Silvestri's saccharine score, all cute little piano high notes and swatches of melody rolling out of the string section. There is also a two-disc soundtrack album containing pop songs heard in the picture. It's music to watch feathers waft in the breeze by, and is therefore appropriate to the film, although it has little value on its own. © William Ruhlmann /TiVo
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Film Soundtracks - Released March 30, 2018 | Decca (UMO) (Classics)

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What do Steven Spielberg and Philippe Clair have in common? They both worked with composer Alan Silvestri on one of their films. Actually, the director of How Did You Get In? We Didn't See You Leave (Par où t’es rentré ? On t’a pas vu sortir) almost could have featured in Ready Player One as the movie’s premise is to pay a glowing and abundant homage to 80s popular culture. Contrary to Philippe Clair, Robert Zemeckis – director of Back to the Future and a long-time collaborator of Silvestri – is indeed referenced several times, most notably through a Rubik’s cube that bears his name. By working with Alan Silvestri (author of the soundtracks for John McTiernan’s Predator and James Cameron’s The Abyss), Spielberg gives his film a sort of “80s quality label”, with which they can both indulge in self-referencing. Ready Player One takes place in a future ravaged by poverty, and describes − through countless special effects − a power struggle to inherit the fortune of the inventor of a role-playing game that has become a virtual gateway (the OASIS) for the entire population to escape this miserable world. While the swirling car race that opens the movie doesn’t rely on music, the one that succeeds and mirrors it uses a track (Why can’t we go backwards?) that, in the brass writing most notably, contains references to Spielberg’s favourite composer, John Williams – who was too busy working on Pentagon Papers and Star Wars: The Last Jedi to take part in this project. The same is true for An Orb Meeting that features a few notes from 1941, a relatively obscure Spielberg’s film, in which he was already prone to self-referencing. In other words, for what appears to be a “classic” blockbuster on the surface, the filmmaker goes pretty far in terms of postmodern mise en abyme. Despite this riot of references, Silvestri’s emotional and dynamic style shines throughout the partition – even if, again, by highlighting his own trademark, the composer plays right into the hands of the movie’s mechanics. Another particularity of Alan Silvestri is his love for melodies, that especially shines through when he composes for the film’s most “humane” characters: young Wade/Parzival (Tye Sheridan) and the game’s creator, James Hallyday (Mark Rylance). These two themes could be a perfect ode to (the nostalgia of) youth as seen by Silvestri/Spielberg, a tribute to its ardour and zeal, but also to its innocence. Beyond the real versus virtual world conundrum, the film’s main theme as well as marketing strategy is: please today’s young, connected filmgoers, while captivating those who were 10 years old in the 1980s. ©Nicolas Magenham/Qobuz
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Film Soundtracks - Released October 16, 2015 | Varese Sarabande

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Alan Silvestri's score for the final installment of the Back to the Future trilogy continues the mix of whimsical sweetness and dramatic action that marked his work for the first two films, but adds some elements from Western scores -- particularly on "We're Out of Gas" -- to reflect the movie's Old West setting. "It's Clara (The Train, Pt. 2)" spans all of these elements, while songs like "Hill Valley" manage to be playful yet menacing, both alternately and at the same time. One strange thing about this album is that it doesn't present some of the cues in the order in which they appeared in the movie: the music for "The Train" sequence, in which Marty McFly and Doc Brown rig the time-traveling DeLorean up to a train in order to return to the 20th century, is scattered throughout the album instead of appearing together. Overall, though, that's a minor quibble, as Silvestri's music is still quite engaging, particularly his instrumental take on ZZ Top's "Doubleback." © Heather Phares /TiVo
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Film Soundtracks - Released March 3, 2014 | Cosmos Studios Music

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Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 2001 | Decca US (Classics)

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Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 2015 | Geffen

Lively fun as Silvestri revisits the themes from the first movie, and adds a few more besides, providing musical sketches of future and past along with more than adequate chase and jeopardy themes. A more satisfying release this time, too, as the album was kept free of any distracting songs. © Steven McDonald /TiVo
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Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 2009 | Varese Sarabande

NIGHT AT THE MUSEUM: BATTLE FOR THE SMITHSONIAN is the stylized, imaginative sequel to 2006’s runaway comedy hit NIGHT AT THE MUSEUM, starring Ben Stiller as a night watchman who discovers that the exhibits he is guarding come to life and wreak havoc throughout the museum. This time around, Stiller is faced with protecting the Smithsonian Institute against Ivan the Terrible, Napoleon Bonaparte, Al Capone, and reawakened Egyptian king Kahmunrah. Providing the action-packed score is Academy Award-nominated composer Alan Silvestri (THE POLAR EXPRESS, FORREST GUMP, BACK TO THE FUTURE). Silvestri employs the Hollywood Studio Symphony, a massive 103-piece orchestra and 18-person choir to bring the sequel to mirthful life. © TiVo
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Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 1994 | Varese Sarabande

Richie Rich falls victim to the excess that undermines so many of Alan Silvestri's scores, and while overindulgence is certainly apropos here. This is, after all, the comic-book tale of the world's wealthiest and most spoiled little boy. It doesn't make the listening experience any more appealing. Silvestri mistakes childishness for childlike energy. His themes are brash and annoying, favoring repetition and bombast over creativity and charm. To be fair, Silvestri isn't given much to work with here -- the film is as painfully unfunny as your average Holocaust documentary -- but Richie Rich's complete absence of heart and humor nevertheless rests on his shoulders. © Jason Ankeny /TiVo
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Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 1997 | Varese Sarabande

Volcano is a typical Alan Silvestri action score -- all brawn and no brains. While the film's basic conceit -- a volcano explodes, so look out below! -- would seem to lend itself to myriad motifs of eruptions and carnage, Silvestri delivers a simple, straightforward effort interchangeable with dozens of other action scores. The threat here could be bloodthirsty aliens, rabid chipmunks, or Ernest Borgnine on ecstasy. The melodies offer no sense of what the film's protagonists are battling, and their core elements (martial snare drums, shrieking brass, and ominous strings) are so thoroughly familiar that contempt is but an inevitability. © Jason Ankeny /TiVo
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Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 1997 | Varese Sarabande

Alan Silvestri's score for the wacky Nathan Lane/Christopher Walken let's-chase-that-pest-out-of-my-house comedy Mouse Hunt is appropriately infectious and entertaining, capturing the film's sense of warm, family fun. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Film Soundtracks - Released November 18, 2016 | Sony Classical

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Film Soundtracks - Released August 15, 2011 | Hollywood Records

After a long collaboration with composer James Horner, filmmaker James Cameron tapped up-and-comer Alan Silvestri to handle musical chores for his 1989 undersea epic The Abyss, and the resulting score proved a marvel of craft and scale. Employing choral and orchestral elements to magical, larger-than-life effect, Silvestri communicates both the pulse-pounding adventure and the mystical otherness that together galvanize the film--his portrayal of the strange world below the water's surface is sublimely atmospheric, evoking the known and the unknown with vivid imagination. © Jason Ankeny /TiVo
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Film Soundtracks - Released October 23, 2020 | WaterTower Music

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Film Soundtracks - Released October 23, 2015 | Silva Screen Records

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Film Soundtracks - Released December 15, 2014 | Varese Sarabande

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Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 2006 | Varese Sarabande

Veteran film score composer Alan Silvestri (FORREST GUMP, THE POLAR EXPRESS) gives a variety of sumptuous orchestral treatments to this New York fable of mysterious nighttime goings on at the Natural History Museum. © TiVo
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Film Soundtracks - Released September 20, 1999 | Varese Sarabande