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Alternative & Indie - Released September 30, 2013 | Play It Again Sam

Hi-Res Booklet + Video Distinctions 4F de Télérama - Qobuzissime - Hi-Res Audio
With Aventine, Agnes Obel gives a little more depth to the intimate, atmospheric and dreamlike world of her first album, the grandiose Philharmonics. Behind a stripped-down piano borrowed from Erik Satie, the Berlin-based Danish artist has added even more grandeur to her miniatures. Her reverberating voice magnifies these immense sonic spaces and  we are left to float along in this sublime sonic material. This waking dream is even more subtle than its predecessor: speckled with a few violins here or a cello there. This record confirms the talent of a timeless musician. © MD/Qobuz
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Alternative & Indie - Released October 6, 2014 | Play It Again Sam

Hi-Res Distinctions 4F de Télérama - Qobuzissime
4 stars out of 5 -- "AVENTINE is a strikingly spare album of great, but frosty, beauty." © TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released September 30, 2013 | Play It Again Sam

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama - Qobuzissime
4 stars out of 5 -- "AVENTINE is a strikingly spare album of great, but frosty, beauty." © TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released May 2, 2011 | Play It Again Sam

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Agnes Obel's striking success in her home country of Denmark with her debut is all the more remarkable given how understated Philharmonics is as a listen, a seemingly straightforward piano/vocal album that isn't. Combining a strong ear for immediate appeal -- Obel's deep singing voice is lovely and her ear for a calm hook is crucial -- with a feeling of just-unsettled-enough unease is key. Part of it lies in Obel's ear for vocal arrangements; hearing her own overdubbed harmonies showcases her talents further, both as performer and producer. But there's something that's not trying to be straightforward here. There's an elegant, slipping darkness that creeps in around the corners, like something is being hidden in plain sight. The short instrumental "Falling, Catching" starts off the album on a sweet note -- perhaps sickly sweet, there's something so strangely focused in its intensity that it almost unsettles. Her first vocal provides a bit of necessary contrast on "Riverside" immediately thereafter, but at the same time further showcases how gently unusual Philharmonics ends up being -- it may not be Patty Waters, say, but it's not Vanessa Carlton or KT Tunstall either. The underpinning bass part on the cover of John Cale's "I Keep a Close Watch" set against the high intensity of the lead piano gives a good personal stamp to a standard, but it's her subtle variety throughout the album that impresses even more. There's "Avenue"'s music-box-meets-near-film-noir-jazz on the one hand, while "Louretta," another short instrumental, has a controlled theatricality that seems like it should soundtrack a Neil Gaiman ballet. "On Powdered Ground" has a gentler sweetness that feels like a slight respite toward the end, but Philharmonics in general aims for the darkly beautiful and succeeds on an unexpected level. © Ned Raggett /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released February 21, 2020 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet
First of all, let’s point out that even though Agnes Obel’s fourth opus is titled Myopia, the Berlin-based Dane manages to musically transpose this visual disability using several acoustic treatments that more or less hit their targets. The most blatant example of this is Roscian, a track in three-quarter time that employs a sepulchral piano. Myopia is an album that (not always anecdotally) portrays the adventurous undertaking of moving out of one’s way in order to see a distant reality more clearly, a reality that was previously opaque. In fact, it’s no coincidence that one of the tracks is called Camera’s Rolling: Obel uses this metaphorical development to organically highlight the idea of opening up to the world, and not always settling for such a closed-off environment. For her, the main tool for this opening up is ‘experimentation’. Myopia feels like an extravagant and ethereal laboratory, where the main test subject is the singer’s voice, accompanied by a piano and mostly melancholic synths. Some give their bodies to science; on her part, Agnes Obel has given her voice to music, testing out a plethora of different effects. Like the test tubes of a mad scientist, her singing boldly intersects and blends together, always beautifully harmonic. Her voice is twisted in several different ways, a constant which is at the core of songs which are somewhere between Kate Bush and Scott Walker. She embarked on this adventure alone in her Berlin studio, even though there are moments here and there when a few chords are played by others. There are eerie moments (Drosera and its repetitive chords wouldn’t be out of place in a Dario Argento film), airy moments (Won’t You Call Me with its warm, cosy choirs), ones that evoke the torments of insomnia (Broken Sleep) or death (Island of Doom); her songs astonish above all with their extreme elegance. With Myopia, Agnes Obel hands us a shiny spyglass with which we can clearly see the beauty of why she seems to exist: music. © Nicolas Magenham/Qobuz
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Alternative & Indie - Released October 21, 2016 | Play It Again Sam

Hi-Res Booklet
Following the wonderful debut album, Philharmonics (2010), and the grandiose sophomore attempt, Aventine (2013), the latest album from Agnes Obel proves beyond a doubt that the Danish artist based in Berlin certainly isn’t resting on her laurels, determined to further evolve her unique musical style with Citizen of Glass. Obel has revisited a number of previous compositions and created some genuinely novel sounds with what is a clear (and successful) attempt to go deeper into the emotional heart of her music. On tracks like Familiar, for example, her haunting vocals are paired with none other than herself – and who’d have thought the result so beautiful. Bigger, and more nourishment than ever before for our musical hungers. Sound is like matter in this wonderfully orchestrated third album.
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Alternative & Indie - Released May 21, 2021 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Alternative & Indie - Released May 2, 2011 | Play It Again Sam

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Alternative & Indie - Released May 25, 2018 | Late Night Tales

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Alternative & Indie - Released October 4, 2010 | Play It Again Sam

Booklet
Agnes Obel's striking success in her home country of Denmark with her debut is all the more remarkable given how understated Philharmonics is as a listen, a seemingly straightforward piano/vocal album that isn't. Combining a strong ear for immediate appeal -- Obel's deep singing voice is lovely and her ear for a calm hook is crucial -- with a feeling of just-unsettled-enough unease is key. Part of it lies in Obel's ear for vocal arrangements; hearing her own overdubbed harmonies showcases her talents further, both as performer and producer. But there's something that's not trying to be straightforward here. There's an elegant, slipping darkness that creeps in around the corners, like something is being hidden in plain sight. The short instrumental "Falling, Catching" starts off the album on a sweet note -- perhaps sickly sweet, there's something so strangely focused in its intensity that it almost unsettles. Her first vocal provides a bit of necessary contrast on "Riverside" immediately thereafter, but at the same time further showcases how gently unusual Philharmonics ends up being -- it may not be Patty Waters, say, but it's not Vanessa Carlton or KT Tunstall either. The underpinning bass part on the cover of John Cale's "I Keep a Close Watch" set against the high intensity of the lead piano gives a good personal stamp to a standard, but it's her subtle variety throughout the album that impresses even more. There's "Avenue"'s music-box-meets-near-film-noir-jazz on the one hand, while "Louretta," another short instrumental, has a controlled theatricality that seems like it should soundtrack a Neil Gaiman ballet. "On Powdered Ground" has a gentler sweetness that feels like a slight respite toward the end, but Philharmonics in general aims for the darkly beautiful and succeeds on an unexpected level. © Ned Raggett /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released June 12, 2020 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Alternative & Indie - Released May 30, 2010 | Play It Again Sam

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Alternative & Indie - Released June 30, 2016 | Play It Again Sam

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Alternative & Indie - Released September 25, 2013 | Play It Again Sam

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Alternative & Indie - Released October 4, 2010 | Play It Again Sam

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Alternative & Indie - Released February 21, 2020 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Booklet
First of all, let’s point out that even though Agnes Obel’s fourth opus is titled Myopia, the Berlin-based Dane manages to musically transpose this visual disability using several acoustic treatments that more or less hit their targets. The most blatant example of this is Roscian, a track in three-quarter time that employs a sepulchral piano. Myopia is an album that (not always anecdotally) portrays the adventurous undertaking of moving out of one’s way in order to see a distant reality more clearly, a reality that was previously opaque. In fact, it’s no coincidence that one of the tracks is called Camera’s Rolling: Obel uses this metaphorical development to organically highlight the idea of opening up to the world, and not always settling for such a closed-off environment. For her, the main tool for this opening up is ‘experimentation’. Myopia feels like an extravagant and ethereal laboratory, where the main test subject is the singer’s voice, accompanied by a piano and mostly melancholic synths. Some give their bodies to science; on her part, Agnes Obel has given her voice to music, testing out a plethora of different effects. Like the test tubes of a mad scientist, her singing boldly intersects and blends together, always beautifully harmonic. Her voice is twisted in several different ways, a constant which is at the core of songs which are somewhere between Kate Bush and Scott Walker. She embarked on this adventure alone in her Berlin studio, even though there are moments here and there when a few chords are played by others. There are eerie moments (Drosera and its repetitive chords wouldn’t be out of place in a Dario Argento film), airy moments (Won’t You Call Me with its warm, cosy choirs), ones that evoke the torments of insomnia (Broken Sleep) or death (Island of Doom); her songs astonish above all with their extreme elegance. With Myopia, Agnes Obel hands us a shiny spyglass with which we can clearly see the beauty of why she seems to exist: music. © Nicolas Magenham/Qobuz
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Alternative & Indie - Released November 18, 2016 | Play It Again Sam

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Alternative & Indie - Released October 29, 2019 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Alternative & Indie - Released October 29, 2019 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Alternative & Indie - Released October 20, 2013 | Play It Again Sam

Artist

Agnes Obel in the magazine
  • The paradox of Agnes Obel's Myopia
    The paradox of Agnes Obel's Myopia With "Myopia", the Danish singer delivers an opus which appears to nevertheless have a clear-cut artistic vision...
  • Obel's Opus
    Obel's Opus What happens when Agnes Obel duets with Agnes Obel…
  • Agnes Obel: Qobuz Interview Video
    Agnes Obel: Qobuz Interview Video With her second album, Agnes Obel once again displays her outstanding talent, playing a wide rage of sophisticated music. Qobuz was lucky enough to conduct an exclusive interview with the Danish Be...