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Symphonic Music - Released August 25, 2009 | Da Capo

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Symphonic Music - Released November 17, 2009 | Da Capo

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Symphonic Music - Released October 1, 2010 | Da Capo

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Symphonic Music - Released August 2, 2011 | Da Capo

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This disc is part of a series by Hungarian-born conductor Adam Fischer and the Danish National Chamber Orchestra traversing the complete Mozart symphonies. That term lands in the middle ground between generally known 41 Mozart symphonies and the approach that includes small-orchestral works such as divertimenti as well as any symphony that might possibly be by Mozart. On this recording of works from Mozart's early teens Fischer is covering territory where there are several cases of disputed authorship; the Symphony in D major, K. 81, may as easily be by Leopold Mozart as by Wolfgang, and according to Jeffrey Zaslaw, on whom the performers claim to rely, the authenticity of the Symphony in D major, K. 95, "has never been seriously enough questioned." The booklet does not address these questions or even address the music at all; it's largely given over to an essay about the Viennese symphonic style (and at this time Vienna was hardly a gleam in Mozart's eye). All this said, the performances are enjoyable for those interested in the question of how genius takes shape. This was perhaps the period when Mozart was most clearly defining his models: his father on one hand, and the Italian symphonists on the other. Whoever wrote these works, it's fascinating to pick out the stylistic strands and see where Mozart clearly picked them up, and what happened when he did. The performances fall into the class of those done on modern instruments but heavily influenced by historical-instrument recordings: the fast movement are fast and vigorous indeed, with brasses and winds allowed to show through the texture and forced to squawk a bit because of the speed. Fischer connects these symphonies with Austrian traditions of outdoor music such as the Feldparthie (field partita) as well as with Italian styles, and his performances, whirlwind-like in the fast passages but in general a bit dry, are clear and engaging. Recommended for followers of Mozart symphony cycles; Fischer and these Danes offer a fresh perspective. © TiVo
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Symphonic Music - Released January 1, 2008 | Dacapo SACD

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Classical - Released June 4, 2013 | Dacapo SACD

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The booklet notes for this Danish National Chamber Orchestra release are striking in that they completely neglect the music under discussion, treating instead several completely different aspects of Mozart's career. This may be the result of cost-cutting connected with what is to be a complete cycle of Mozart symphonies from the forces involved, and the performances are certainly competent. What you get here are the symphonies usually numbered 6, 7, and 8, plus two unnumbered works, K .45a and K. 45b. The symphonies were composed in 1767 and 1768, when Mozart was ten or eleven years old. Unlike the orchestral works of Mozart's precocious early childhood, these are full-scale works between about 9 and 14 minutes long in total. The voice of the mature Mozart is here even if the technique is not; the works are original at every turn, and perhaps the best way to think of them is to take them as imperfect pieces that make very interesting mistakes. The straightforward style of the veteran Hungarian-born Mozart conductor Adam Fischer is just the ticket here; the music is clean and clear without the preciousness that mars so many performances of music of the child Mozart, and without attempts to make more of the music than is actually there. Denmark Radio's studio sound is no more than adequate. © TiVo
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Symphonic Music - Released February 24, 2007 | Dacapo SACD

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"Listeners prone to high blood pressure should consult their doctors first...." So says conductor Adam Fischer in the liner notes for Volume 5 of the Danish Radio Sinfonietta's cycle of the Mozart symphonies. An exaggeration? Perhaps. One of the cheesiest accolades ever given to someone's own work? Absolutely. Despite any risks to their cardiovascular systems, listeners are indeed treated to a lively and vivacious performance of these four early symphonies, written in 1772. The Danish Radio Sinfonietta, which plays on modern instruments, clearly favors brisk tempos. For the most part, this extra energy is very successful, especially in these earlier compositions that may lack some of the depth and profundity of the later symphonies. There are a few moments, however, when Fischer gets a little carried away, most notably in the Presto of K. 124, which is so aggressive and brusque that it's downright noisy. The rest of the album is more successful in finding an appropriate balance between dignity and excitement. The liner notes (apart from Fischer's own assessments of his own work) are of particular interest. Not only do they put the year 1772 in musical context, but they also go into enjoyable detail as to what was occurring in the rest of the world at the same time. If you think your heart can handle it, this album is certainly worth a look. © TiVo