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Symphonic Music - Released March 16, 2018 | CAvi-music

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Symphonic Music - Released August 25, 2009 | Da Capo

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Classical - Released November 10, 2017 | CAvi-music

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Symphonic Music - Released August 2, 2011 | Da Capo

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This disc is part of a series by Hungarian-born conductor Adam Fischer and the Danish National Chamber Orchestra traversing the complete Mozart symphonies. That term lands in the middle ground between generally known 41 Mozart symphonies and the approach that includes small-orchestral works such as divertimenti as well as any symphony that might possibly be by Mozart. On this recording of works from Mozart's early teens Fischer is covering territory where there are several cases of disputed authorship; the Symphony in D major, K. 81, may as easily be by Leopold Mozart as by Wolfgang, and according to Jeffrey Zaslaw, on whom the performers claim to rely, the authenticity of the Symphony in D major, K. 95, "has never been seriously enough questioned." The booklet does not address these questions or even address the music at all; it's largely given over to an essay about the Viennese symphonic style (and at this time Vienna was hardly a gleam in Mozart's eye). All this said, the performances are enjoyable for those interested in the question of how genius takes shape. This was perhaps the period when Mozart was most clearly defining his models: his father on one hand, and the Italian symphonists on the other. Whoever wrote these works, it's fascinating to pick out the stylistic strands and see where Mozart clearly picked them up, and what happened when he did. The performances fall into the class of those done on modern instruments but heavily influenced by historical-instrument recordings: the fast movement are fast and vigorous indeed, with brasses and winds allowed to show through the texture and forced to squawk a bit because of the speed. Fischer connects these symphonies with Austrian traditions of outdoor music such as the Feldparthie (field partita) as well as with Italian styles, and his performances, whirlwind-like in the fast passages but in general a bit dry, are clear and engaging. Recommended for followers of Mozart symphony cycles; Fischer and these Danes offer a fresh perspective. © TiVo
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Symphonic Music - Released November 17, 2009 | Da Capo

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Symphonic Music - Released January 1, 2008 | Dacapo SACD

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Symphonic Music - Released October 1, 2010 | Da Capo

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Classical - Released June 4, 2013 | Dacapo SACD

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The booklet notes for this Danish National Chamber Orchestra release are striking in that they completely neglect the music under discussion, treating instead several completely different aspects of Mozart's career. This may be the result of cost-cutting connected with what is to be a complete cycle of Mozart symphonies from the forces involved, and the performances are certainly competent. What you get here are the symphonies usually numbered 6, 7, and 8, plus two unnumbered works, K .45a and K. 45b. The symphonies were composed in 1767 and 1768, when Mozart was ten or eleven years old. Unlike the orchestral works of Mozart's precocious early childhood, these are full-scale works between about 9 and 14 minutes long in total. The voice of the mature Mozart is here even if the technique is not; the works are original at every turn, and perhaps the best way to think of them is to take them as imperfect pieces that make very interesting mistakes. The straightforward style of the veteran Hungarian-born Mozart conductor Adam Fischer is just the ticket here; the music is clean and clear without the preciousness that mars so many performances of music of the child Mozart, and without attempts to make more of the music than is actually there. Denmark Radio's studio sound is no more than adequate. © TiVo
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Symphonic Music - Released February 24, 2007 | Dacapo SACD

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"Listeners prone to high blood pressure should consult their doctors first...." So says conductor Adam Fischer in the liner notes for Volume 5 of the Danish Radio Sinfonietta's cycle of the Mozart symphonies. An exaggeration? Perhaps. One of the cheesiest accolades ever given to someone's own work? Absolutely. Despite any risks to their cardiovascular systems, listeners are indeed treated to a lively and vivacious performance of these four early symphonies, written in 1772. The Danish Radio Sinfonietta, which plays on modern instruments, clearly favors brisk tempos. For the most part, this extra energy is very successful, especially in these earlier compositions that may lack some of the depth and profundity of the later symphonies. There are a few moments, however, when Fischer gets a little carried away, most notably in the Presto of K. 124, which is so aggressive and brusque that it's downright noisy. The rest of the album is more successful in finding an appropriate balance between dignity and excitement. The liner notes (apart from Fischer's own assessments of his own work) are of particular interest. Not only do they put the year 1772 in musical context, but they also go into enjoyable detail as to what was occurring in the rest of the world at the same time. If you think your heart can handle it, this album is certainly worth a look. © TiVo
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Classical - Released August 18, 2017 | CAvi-music

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"The Fourth is Mahler’s most transparent and lyrical symphony – almost a chamber symphony. Probably also due to its rather reduced format, it has been received in unique and contradictory ways. Even during the time when international audiences had practically no knowledge of Mahler’s music, the Fourth remained relatively popular. Today it is regarded as less impressive than the First, Second, Third, Fifth and Sixth Symphonies; from my point of view, however, this stems from an unacceptable misunderstanding. Stylistically, the Fourth poses a truly special challenge I find quite exciting. It is Mahler’s “Pastoral Symphony”. The musical style of the Vienna Secession movement tended to integrate elements of Viennese musical tradition into purely classical works. Many listeners did not take that tendency seriously and branded it as harking back to overbaked ideas (I overheard statements to this effect when I was a child). Of all Mahler’s symphonies, the Fourth is perhaps the one where he puts those Viennese elements most clearly on display. I once even heard the cruel remark that Mahler’s Fourth Symphony amounted to nothing else than the expression of his sadness for not being Schubert. Frankly, this music is everything else but a Schubert imitation. Much of Schubert – and of Haydn – admittedly does resurface here, along with typical Viennese effects including a particular kind of glissando, for instance, and those stylistic means are one of the Fourth’s essential elements. We should therefore perform them in a way that makes them quite noticeable." (from booklet)
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Classical - Released February 19, 2021 | CAvi-music

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It is often the world's most famous orchestras that undertake the Mahler symphonies, for these works stretch them to their limits, but of course, they're played all the time by groups of the second tier, right on the edge of the top tier, and one can argue that what Mahler heard when he stepped to the podium in his day more resembled these than the blazing brass of, say, the Chicago Symphony or the Berlin Philharmonic. Will the listener miss the virtuoso section playing in this reading by Ádám Fischer and the Düsseldorfer Symphoniker? Only rarely. Really, the strings are remarkable in this reading; Fischer catches the long lines of the work in big stretches of quiet music that are kept exquisitely controlled, all the more impressive in that this is a 2019 live performance of one of the most difficult works in the symphonic repertory. The "Urlicht" fourth movement is extraordinary, transcendent, with marvelous cooperation between Fischer and alto Nadine Weissmann; the sharper-edged voice of soprano Tünde Szabóki contrasts nicely with hers. The overall quiet mood extends to the opening movement, where some may prefer a more imposing approach, but it fits with Fischer's general mood. The only place where the performance falls short is in the work of the Choir of the Städtischer Musikverein zu Düsseldorf, which is a bit pitch-insecure and has a tendency to sound like a shapeless mass. This tendency is amplified by a rather cavernous sound from the planetarium space of the Tonhalle Düsseldorf. However, this is a must for Fischer fans and a strong Mahler Second for anyone. © TiVo
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Classical - Released May 29, 2020 | CAvi-music

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Symphonic Music - Released October 12, 2018 | CAvi-music

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Full Operas - Released October 5, 2010 | Da Capo

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Full Operas - Released January 26, 2010 | Da Capo

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Symphonies - Released September 17, 2021 | CAvi-music

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Classical - Released November 22, 2019 | CAvi-music

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Classical - Released January 25, 2008 | BMC Records

This disc is part of a delightful series of Hungarian releases revisiting some unusual Kodály works under the baton of veteran conductor Adam Fischer. Here he leads the Hungarian Radio Symphony Orchestra, whose brass section executes Kodály's comic lines without a hint of stress. There is one familiar repertory item here: the Háry János-Suite, a colorful, at times laugh-out-loud funny (if you dare) set of episodes from a picaresque comic opera. Fischer catches the work's slightly twisted marches (including "La Marseillaise") and effects like the Viennese Musical Clock (track 2) with understated effect. The other two works on the disc show the evolution of Kodály's folk-influenced language from late-Romantic intervallic flavoring to more structural conceptions. The rarity here is the symphonic poem Summer Evening, a student piece written in 1906 and revised in 1928 with a dedication to Arturo Toscanini. It's a calm piece of orchestral reverie with pentatonic melodies resounding in the night air. The Variations on a Hungarian Folk Song (The Peacock) are especially nicely explicated in the informative booklet notes by Anna Dalos (in Hungarian, French, and English). In this work Kodály brings together the motivic treatment of Beethoven's large set of Eroica Variations, Op. 35, whose external pattern Kodály follows closely (down to appearance of the bass line as the initual gesture), and his explorations of Hungarian folk music. It's not a simple work, and Fischer's slightly restrained reading is once again ideal even if some of its toughest brass passages do slip slightly out of control. The graphic design in this series is fresh, and the studio sound is clear and attractive. A good choice for anyone from serious Kodály fans to listeners whose ears have been caught by the Háry János-Suite. © TiVo
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Symphonic Music - Released January 1, 1991 | Capriole

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Classical - Released January 1, 2003 | Planet Blue Records USA