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Hard Rock - Released March 5, 2021 | Fueled By Ramen

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Rock - Released October 8, 2013 | ADTR Records

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Rock - Released September 2, 2016 | ADTR Records

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Rock - Released November 16, 2010 | Victory Records

The fourth full-length offering from Ocala, FL-based punk-pop/metalcore outfit A Day to Remember opens with vocalist Jeremy McKinnon screaming “I am fueled by all forms of failure”. What Separates Me from You is whiney, petulant, immature, hopeless, and thoroughly addicting, as the ten songs contained within the gatefold packaging (with the not-so-subtle painting of a man on a busy city street, trapped in an hourglass as the sand piles up around him) are as immaculately crafted and engaging as they are blindingly self-absorbed. Produced by New Found Glory’s Chad Gilbert, WSMFY blurs the line between clean vocal emo-punk and throat-exploding metalcore with great success, especially on the more brutal offerings like “Sticks and Stone”, “2nd Sucks”, “You Be Tails,” “I'll Be Sonic,” and the guitarmony-laden album high point “This Is the House that Doubt Built.” While mopey, melodic punk-pop jams like “All Signs Point to Lauderdale” and “Out of Time” may sound like second-rate Against Me! cuts, the performances are so flawless and the knob-twiddling (mouse clicking) is so dialed in, that the volume nearly goes up on its own. © James Christopher Monger /TiVo
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Rock - Released February 3, 2009 | Victory Records

Ocala, FL-based post-hardcore outfit A Day to Remember's third full-length offering opens with the blistering "The Downfall of Us All," a hugely melodic slice of metal-infused punk-pop bliss that's sure to land a second life in countless montages on MTV reality shows and 30-second cola commercials. What follows is a collection of perfectly executed and fairly standard clean vocal post-hardcore emo-pop that both revels in and illuminates the limitations of the genre. While lead singer Jeremy McKinnon fulfills his duty as a clean/screamo switch-hitter throughout Homesick, the incessant group vocals provide the thread from which the album was designed. Exciting at first, the constant "yeahs" and "heys" eventually dissolve into the waves of distortion mid-album, resulting in the audio equivalent of an energy drink crash. The band does its best to juggle both worlds on the pretty, simplistic, and anthemic "Have Faith in Me," and closer "If It Means a Lot to You" provides fans with a fine Bic lighter/cell phone light moment, but there's just not enough here to separate it from the deafening, ultimately forgettable, over-compressed slabs of twentysomething angst that came before it. © James Christopher Monger /TiVo
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Rock - Released January 22, 2007 | Victory Records

A Day to Remember have quite the multiple personality. One second they're blasting the most melodic pop-punk this side of TRL, and the next, they're channeling the depths of hell with acerbic growling and heavy breakdowns. And this is all in the same song. For Those Who Have Heart has a suitable opener in "Fast Forward to 2012," a concise display of the band's volatile persona; it launches forth in melodic hardcore mode before quickly dropping into death snarling and sludgy riffing, using strong gang vocals as the short bridge between the two. This combo continues in varying levels throughout, though the metal does fade out slightly more as things progress. Through it all, A Day to Remember's love of hardcore shines through, using both old-school lettering to adorn the album's front and spouting defiant lines of solidarity and friendship (when they're not bitching about an ex, that is). It's a rather haphazard, somewhat jarring mix overall -- and that's not even considering the pensive piano interlude that is "The Price We Pay." The pop is catchy enough to rope in the kids blasting Senses Fail and Hawthorne Heights, though for them, the growling will take some acclimating. And on the other side of the spectrum, the metalcore kids will love the spitting and snarling, but may not necessarily want their breakdowns coated in sugar. But somewhere in the middle an As I Lay Dying fan is dating a Fall Out Boy devotee, and they're in desperate need of a compromise album. For Those Who Have Heart could very well fill that void. © Corey Apar /TiVo
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Rock - Released February 3, 2009 | Victory Records

Ocala, FL-based post-hardcore outfit A Day to Remember's third full-length offering opens with the blistering "The Downfall of Us All," a hugely melodic slice of metal-infused punk-pop bliss that's sure to land a second life in countless montages on MTV reality shows and 30-second cola commercials. What follows is a collection of perfectly executed and fairly standard clean vocal post-hardcore emo-pop that both revels in and illuminates the limitations of the genre. While lead singer Jeremy McKinnon fulfills his duty as a clean/screamo switch-hitter throughout Homesick, the incessant group vocals provide the thread from which the album was designed. Exciting at first, the constant "yeahs" and "heys" eventually dissolve into the waves of distortion mid-album, resulting in the audio equivalent of an energy drink crash. The band does its best to juggle both worlds on the pretty, simplistic, and anthemic "Have Faith in Me," and closer "If It Means a Lot to You" provides fans with a fine Bic lighter/cell phone light moment, but there's just not enough here to separate it from the deafening, ultimately forgettable, over-compressed slabs of twentysomething angst that came before it. © James Christopher Monger /TiVo
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Hard Rock - Released January 25, 2021 | Fueled By Ramen

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Hard Rock - Released November 22, 2019 | Fueled By Ramen

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Hard Rock - Released April 14, 2020 | Fueled By Ramen

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Hard Rock - Released January 27, 2021 | Fueled By Ramen

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Hard Rock - Released November 18, 2020 | Fueled By Ramen

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Electronic - Released May 10, 2005 | Indianola Records

Emo enthusiasts will probably take the title of A Day to Remember's And Their Name Was Treason quite literally, as here is yet another young band clearly steeped in that scene, now turning to embrace the seemingly "next" musical trend that is the ever more popular metalcore style. Meanwhile and for their part, metalheads are sure to exclaim: "Not another one!" In either case, like so many of these acts, A Day to Remember write bite-sized songs that constantly waver back and forth between extremely melodic chorus sections (at times saccharinely so) and depths-of-hell Cookie Monster growling (at times scarily convincing), with almost maddening reliability. That's not to say that they don't uncork the occasional excellent example of the form, such as the power pop-leaning "A Second Glance" or the incredibly heavy "1958." But, these bright spots aside, one can literally predict the band's switches between its hard/soft facets with disturbing accuracy, having never heard the songs before. Even more clichéd, is how the band dresses up the same old, beat-to-death emo subjects of unrequited love and teenage alienation with pseudo-funny ("Casablanca Sucked Anyways") or metallically "tough" titles like "If Looks Could Kill" and "You Should Have Killed Me When You Had the Chance." No comment on the textbook, yawn-inducing acoustic ballad "You Had Me at Hello" (other than perhaps: "how cute"), and even their requisite cult flick quote choice -- from Donnie Darko -- seems a little too obvious. Does all this mean that And Their Name Was Treason is no good? Not really: it's no better or worse than a thousand emocore albums released during a 12-month span; but it's still but one of thousands, so good luck standing out of the pack. © Eduardo Rivadavia /TiVo
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Rock - Released May 25, 2010 | Victory Records

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Rock - Released October 28, 2008 | Victory Records

What’s a relatively young band with their star on the rise to do when their new fans are having trouble tracking down their older releases? If you’re Florida’s A Day to Remember, you re-release one of them, remastered and complete with new artwork and title. Fans from the beginning probably don’t need the aptly titled OLD RECORD, despite the crisp new sound. But newcomers will flip their lids over A Day to Remember’s special blend of muscular hardcore and approachable pop-punk. © TiVo
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Rock - Released September 30, 2011 | Victory Records