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Traditional Jazz & New Orleans - Released December 12, 2006 | Fremeaux Heritage

Distinctions Diapason d'or - 4 étoiles Jazzman - The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Traditional Jazz & New Orleans - Released December 12, 2006 | Fremeaux Heritage

Distinctions Diapason d'or - Choc Jazzman - Le Choix de France Musique
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Traditional Jazz & New Orleans - Released December 12, 2006 | Fremeaux Heritage

Distinctions Diapason d'or - 4 étoiles Jazzman - The Qobuz Standard
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Traditional Jazz & New Orleans - Released December 12, 2006 | Fremeaux Heritage

Distinctions Diapason d'or - 4F de Télérama - Choc Jazzman
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Traditional Jazz & New Orleans - Released December 12, 2006 | Fremeaux Heritage

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - The Qobuz Standard
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Traditional Jazz & New Orleans - Released January 1, 1990 | Columbia Jazz Masterpieces

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - The Qobuz Standard
Cornetist Bix Beiderbecke's greatest recordings were mostly made in 1927. This definitive CD (reissued in 1990) has most of Beiderbecke's best-loved work, including "Singin' the Blues," "I'm Coming Virginia," "Ostrich Walk," "Way Down Yonder in New Orleans," and his solo piano classic "In a Mist." Most of the recordings were cut with Frankie Trumbauer's Orchestra, although there are also two titles from the Broadway Bellhops, a similar group. The beauty of Beiderbecke's horn outshone virtually every other brassman in the 1920s other than Louis Armstrong, and he never sounded better than on these records. Beiderbecke is joined by such notables as C-melody saxophonist Trumbauer, guitarist Eddie Lang, clarinetist Jimmy Dorsey, trombonist Bill Rank, and clarinetist Don Murray, among others. In addition to the titles mentioned, the renditions of "Clarinet Marmalade," Hoagy Carmichael's "Riverboat Shuffle," and "Wringin' and Twistin'" are among the other highlights. Essential music that in one form or another belongs in every serious jazz collection. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
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Traditional Jazz & New Orleans - Released January 27, 2003 | Saga

Booklet Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - The Qobuz Standard
In 2004, Saga Jazz poured two dozen Fats Waller recordings into a more or less chronologically arranged collection named after one of his very best compositions, The Alligator Crawl. This unusual Waller album concentrates almost exclusively upon his piano solos, beginning with "Handful of Keys" and "Numb Fumblin'," recorded on March 1, 1929, and closing with two solos punctuated by vocal outbursts recorded for the Armed Forces V-Disc label on September 23, 1943. Waller is heard with his Rhythm group on two sides dating from January 1935. These are the salty "Because of Once Upon a Time" and the moody "Night Wind," a song of heartbreak with breathtaking passages played upon the organ. He also sings on "I'm Crazy 'Bout My Baby" and "Draggin' My Heart Around." These solo piano performances date from 1931, a year during which Waller also recorded with bands led by Ted Lewis and Jack Teagarden. The fact that this collection contains mostly piano solos means that the very essence of Thomas Waller's musical world is presented without a lot of distractions. It provides an excellent opportunity for understanding the man's artistry on a deeper level than is often achieved or even hinted at by collections that focus upon his comedic talents. © arwulf arwulf /TiVo
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Traditional Jazz & New Orleans - Released February 12, 2008 | Fremeaux Heritage

Distinctions 4 étoiles Jazzman - 10 de Classica-Répertoire
Taken literally, the title of Fremeaux's Quintessence series promises that listeners will encounter the concentrated, unadulterated, essence of the musical legacies documented therein. Released in 2007, this label's double-disc anthology of recordings made by virtuoso clarinetist Benny Goodman in New York, Philadelphia, Los Angeles, and Stockholm between July 1935 and November 1954 lives up to this heady assignment by presenting a well-chosen array of 36 outstanding studio, live, and radio broadcast performances, with the big band featured on disc one and a dazzling series of small groups lined up across disc two. The Benny Goodman Orchestra essentially defined big-band swing music for the U.S. and the world during the 1930s and early '40s. Beginning with the classic 1935 realization of Jelly Roll Morton's "King Porter Stomp," 18 examples of Goodman's mastery of the large jazz ensemble unfold chronologically. Goodman's star soloists in this realm included trumpeters Bunny Berigan, Cootie Williams and Charlie Shavers, trombonist Kai Winding, saxophonists Georgie Auld, Don Byas and Stan Getz, pianist Jess Stacy and drummer Gene Krupa. Vocalist Peggy Lee is featured on Irving Berlin's "I Threw a Kiss in the Ocean." Goodman's arrangers as represented here spell out the grand tradition of big-band arranging. They include Fletcher and Horace Henderson, Gordon Jenkins, Edgar Sampson, Eddie Sauter, Buster Harding, Toots Camarata, Buck Clayton, Mary Lou Williams and Chico O'Farrill. Disc two is a fascinating survey of Goodman's experiments with the duo, trio, quartet, quintet, sextet and septet formulae. It presents the historic 1935 Goodman/Teddy Wilson/ Krupa combination, the marvelous addition of vibraphonist Lionel Hampton in 1936, singer Martha Tilton's superb rendering of "Bei Mir Bist Du Schoen" backed by the quartet in 1937, and subsequent interactions with pianists Count Basie, Mel Powell and Johnny Guarnieri; guitarists Charlie Christian and Billy Bauer (who was closely associated with Lennie Tristano at that time); trumpeter Fats Navarro and saxophonist Wardell Gray; bassist Slam Stewart, drummer Dave Tough, vibraphonist Red Norvo and jazz accordionist Ernie Felice (on "I'll Always Be in Love with You"). Don't miss the lovely version of "Lazy River," rendered as a duet with pianist Jimmy Rowles. This delightful collection concludes with an extended jam by a seven-piece ensemble on "Air Mail Special," air-checked off of a live radio broadcast from Stockholm, Sweden on April 4, 1950. With Goodman on this occasion were trumpeter Roy Eldridge and saxophonist Zoot Sims. Cumulatively, the players and their music add up to what the producers intended for us to have: an excellent mini-history of Benny Goodman containing some of the best swing and bop recordings that ever appeared under his name. There are almost too many Benny Goodman collections on the market -- let it be known that this one ranks with the best. © arwulf arwulf /TiVo
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Traditional Jazz & New Orleans - Released October 24, 1997 | Columbia - Legacy

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Columbia's Greatest Hits is a solid collection boasting the most familiar versions of such Benny Goodman hits as "Let's Dance," "Clarinet a La King," "Jersey Bounce," "Flying Home," "Slipped Disc," "Air Mail Special," "Benny Rides Again" and "Sing, Sing, Sing (With a Swing)." It's not a perfect collection, but it does offer a good introduction for the curious. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Traditional Jazz & New Orleans - Released January 1, 1954 | Legacy - Columbia

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
This recording was not only Louis Armstrong's finest record of the 1950s but one of the truly classic jazz sets. Armstrong and his All-Stars (trombonist Trummy Young, clarinetist Barney Bigard, pianist Billy Kyle, bassist Arvell Shaw, drummer Barrett Deems, and singer Velma Middleton) were clearly inspired by the fresh repertoire, 11 songs written by W.C. Handy. Their nearly nine-minute version of "St. Louis Blues" -- with witty vocals, roaring Young trombone, and a couple of long majestic trumpet solos -- is arguably the greatest version of the oft-recorded song. Other highlights include "Loveless Love," "Beale Street Blues," and a romping version of "Ole Miss Blues." Essential music for all serious jazz collections. [Some reissues also include rehearsal versions of three songs, Louis Armstrong telling a joke, and a brief George Avakian interview with W.C. Handy.] © Scott Yanow /TiVo
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Traditional Jazz & New Orleans - Released January 1, 1954 | Legacy - Columbia

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
This recording was not only Louis Armstrong's finest record of the 1950s but one of the truly classic jazz sets. Armstrong and his All-Stars (trombonist Trummy Young, clarinetist Barney Bigard, pianist Billy Kyle, bassist Arvell Shaw, drummer Barrett Deems, and singer Velma Middleton) were clearly inspired by the fresh repertoire, 11 songs written by W.C. Handy. Their nearly nine-minute version of "St. Louis Blues" -- with witty vocals, roaring Young trombone, and a couple of long majestic trumpet solos -- is arguably the greatest version of the oft-recorded song. Other highlights include "Loveless Love," "Beale Street Blues," and a romping version of "Ole Miss Blues." Essential music for all serious jazz collections. [Some reissues also include rehearsal versions of three songs, Louis Armstrong telling a joke, and a brief George Avakian interview with W.C. Handy.] © Scott Yanow /TiVo
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Traditional Jazz & New Orleans - Released September 25, 1990 | Columbia Jazz Masterpieces

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
This second installment into Bix's recorded career focuses on the sides he made while working as a member of Paul Whiteman's band. Cutting dates with old friends and bandmates like Frank Trumbauer, Adrian Rollini, Pee Wee Russell, Bill Rank, Eddie Lang, and drummer Chauncey Morehouse, these sides chronicle Bix's activities in the studios away from the "king of jazz" between 1927 and 1928. But don't consider all these sides as some sort of hot jazz oasis away from the more stilted arrangements of the Whiteman band; there's more than enough corn aboard on sides like "Mississippi Mud," two takes of "Clorinda," "Our Bungalow of Dreams," and "There'll Come a Time," several of these tracks clumsily adorned with annoying glee-club vocals. But sides like the two takes of "Three Blind Mice," "Sorry," "Jazz Me Blues," "Royal Garden Blues," and "Since My Best Gal Turned Me Down" show Bix still was full of creative ideas galore and a tone to die for. While conventional wisdom has this period as the start of Bix's musical decline, these sides show that there was much great music left in him. © Cub Koda /TiVo
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Traditional Jazz & New Orleans - Released December 12, 2006 | Fremeaux Heritage

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
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Traditional Jazz & New Orleans - Released February 28, 1990 | Columbia

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
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Traditional Jazz & New Orleans - Released August 16, 2005 | Saga

Booklet Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
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Traditional Jazz & New Orleans - Released May 31, 2010 | Fremeaux Heritage

Distinctions Choc Jazzman
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Traditional Jazz & New Orleans - Released January 1, 2014 | T. C. In Productions

Hi-Res Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
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Traditional Jazz & New Orleans - Released June 7, 1991 | Warner Records

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Traditional Jazz & New Orleans - Released February 12, 2021 | To Be Jazz

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Traditional Jazz & New Orleans - Released November 5, 1999 | Warner Records