Albums

€6.66

Folk - Released December 31, 1899 | Acetate

€9.99

Folk - Released January 1, 1950 | ATHINAIKI DISKOGRAFIKI

€8.99

Folk - Released January 1, 1952 | Folkways Records

€9.99

Folk - Released January 1, 1953 | Folkways Records

€13.99

Folk - Released January 1, 1954 | Vanguard Records

€8.99

Folk - Released January 1, 1954 | Folkways Records

This self-titled Pete Seeger album is a reissue of the 1953 10" LP A Pete Seeger Concert released by Stinson Records and contains 12 live recordings apparently made in the early '50s. No date is given, but Seeger sings "Kisses Sweeter Than Wine," a 1951 hit for his old group the Weavers, and since the initial release was in 1953, that tends to narrow the time period. Although this is a live recording made with a warm audience willing to sing along, the tracks have had the applause largely edited out. Seeger turns in a characteristic set that mixes folk songs from around the world -- Israel ("Road to Eilat"), Korea ("Ariran"), Germany ("Die Dendanken Sind Frei"), and Africa ("Bayeza") -- along with more familiar British/American fare touching on whaling, railroads, and factories. As much teacher as singer and song leader, he frails his banjo or strums his guitar while explaining the origins of the songs, then encourages his listeners to join him on the choruses. Although this reissue appeared at the height of his commercial renaissance in the mid-'60s, it presents the sort of performance he gave throughout his career. ~ William Ruhlmann
€9.99

Folk - Released January 1, 1954 | Folkways Records

€9.99

Folk - Released January 1, 1954 | Folkways Records

Pete Seeger has sold many copies of his instructional manual How to Play the Five-String Banjo, and this recording provides some of the basics. Seeger notes that really all he has time to do here is, by analogy, teach the student how to mix and pour concrete, hammer a nail, and saw on the square, not give instructions on how to build an entire house. The banjo is a highly percussive stringed instrument, and Seeger concentrates on methods of getting sound out of it with terms he has invented himself, including "hammering on" and "pulling off," as well as strumming techniques. He is careful to point out which fingers on the hand should be used for particular sounds and how those fingers should be applied to the strings. Although the information is provided quickly on a disc that runs little over a half an hour, each point is one that the student will have to practice repeatedly to reach the speeds Seeger demonstrates. So, this is an album to listen to over and over, and Seeger even suggests ways of modifying a record player to get it to play particular sections of an LP repeatedly. ~ William Ruhlmann
€9.99

Folk - Released January 1, 1954 | Folkways Records

Pete Seeger's Frontier Ballads collection is a double-length LP of 19th century American songs tracing rural life and the development of the American West. Seeger accompanies himself on the banjo (with the occasional a cappella song thrown in) on material divided into three thematic sections. Immigrants contains seven songs referring to those who came to the U.S., their experiences explored in such lyrics as "No Irish Need Apply." The next seven songs, The Trek, concern the movement west with special attention paid to the "Cumberland Gap" and the "Erie Canal," as well as encounters with "Sioux Indians." Tracks 15-27 recount the experiences of The Settlers as they hunt, farm, build railroads, distill liquor, and just live. The album's extensive liner notes put the songs into historical context, and Seeger's spirited performances bring to life a panorama of American experiences during the 19th century when the country was being discovered and settled. ~ William Ruhlmann
€9.99

Folk - Released January 1, 1955 | Folkways Records

€9.99

Folk - Released January 1, 1955 | Folkways Records

Having previously offered instruction in how to play the five-string banjo, Pete Seeger here provides the basics on playing guitar for folksingers. The basics are very basic, he explains, noting that, while playing a musical instrument can be as difficult to learn as one makes it, the simplest lessons are so simple that they are like walking, keeping in mind that a child takes years to learn to walk. That said, Seeger gets the listener playing songs after learning only one chord and, along with two more chords, notes that now "you can play most of the folk songs you know." The rest might be considered advanced learning: capos, strumming, bass runs, counter-melodies, fingerpicking, non-standard tunings, unusual rhythms, etc. Of course, this isn't so much an album to listen to straight through as it is one to practice with until the various elements are mastered through extensive practice. In the accompanying booklet, Seeger discusses how to read music and lists many more chords, as well as some records for further listening. (He also suggests ways to modify one's record player to get the tracks on the album to play over and over.) ~ William Ruhlmann
€9.99

Folk - Released January 1, 1956 | Folkways Records

Given Pete Seeger's oft-expressed disdain for conventional pop music and its lyrics about teenage romance, it should be no surprise that even though Folkways Records here is releasing a Seeger album with the words "love songs" in the title, they are not your usual sort of love songs. That is clear enough from the prepositional phrase that modifies the term: "for friends and foes." True, Seeger does refer to romantic and even erotic love in such selections as the traditional folk song "She Moves Through the Fair" and his solo version of the old hit by his group the Weavers, "Kisses Sweeter than Wine." But for the most part, he is interested in singing songs about love of country, of peace as opposed to war, and of universal brotherhood as opposed to segregation and bigotry. In fact, this is as political an album as Seeger has ever assembled, including his version of Ed McCurdy's paean to peace, "Last Night I Had the Strangest Dream," as well as his own co-composition (with fellow Weaver Lee Hays), "If I Had a Hammer (Hammer Song)," with its tribute to "the song about love between my brothers and my sisters all over this land." Among his foes, Seeger counts "Mr. Bilbo" (i.e., U.S. Senator Theodore Bilbo, D-Mississippi, 1877-1947), whom he instructs in Bob Claiborne's "Listen, Mr. Bilbo" about how immigrants and minorities helped discover, found, and defend America. In "Black and White," meanwhile, he is joined by an unnamed chorus of children on a song concerning the Supreme Court's 1954 Brown v. Board of Education decision outlawing segregation in public schools. There are traditional folk songs and lively instrumentals on which Seeger whistles or plays the chalil interspersing the political tracts. But Love Songs for Friends and Foes is among the singer's more vociferous statements of his liberal social views. ~ William Ruhlmann
€9.99

Folk - Released January 1, 1956 | Folkways Records

Pete Seeger is renowned as a children's entertainer, but at the concert held in the fall of 1955 at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City documented on this album, he addressed a slightly older crowd of college students. They may not have giggled quite as much as audiences he has addressed at grade schools and summer camps, but they were equally responsive. Indeed, they sound like they came to sing, which is a good frame of mind to be in when attending a Pete Seeger concert. He gave them a fairly typical program, ranging from old folk songs to more contemporary fare (including, to the delight of his listeners, a brief parody of "Davy Crockett"). He sang seasonal material and spirituals; he imported songs from Norway ("Oleanna"), Puerto Rico ("Que Bonita Bandera"), and South Africa ("Senzenina/Wimoweh"); and he did not neglect his political viewpoint. The South African medley featured songs using only one word each, yet he explained their political import as expressing protest against the racist regime. And he closed the show referring to his adversarial testimony before the House Committee on Un-American Activities earlier in 1955, at which he tried to sing the old Weavers song "Wasn't That a Time?," but was refused permission to do so. Here, he did sing it, stirringly linking the American Revolution, the Civil War, and World War II to the present redbaiting era when "madmen" rule and "free men go to jail." With contempt citations hanging over his head after that HUAC testimony, such words were not merely poetry to him, a fact no doubt appreciated by the college audience who sang along so sweetly. ~ William Ruhlmann
€9.99

Folk - Released January 1, 1957 | Folkways Records

€9.99

Folk - Released January 1, 1957 | Folkways Records

€9.99

Folk - Released January 1, 1957 | Folkways Records

The 14 "American ballads" Pete Seeger chose to sing on this album while accompanying himself on the banjo are songs sung in the U.S., but often not originating there. Annotator Norman Studer notes that "some of the ballads in this album have been enjoyed for hundreds of years," and the introduction to "Down in Carlisle (In Castyle There Lived a Lady)" acknowledges that "This story goes back to Roman days, if not earlier." Still, they have been collected from rural American singers whose ancestors brought them across the Atlantic, Seeger noting, for example, that he learned "The Golden Vanity" from a Carter Family recording. And there are songs that clearly did originate, at least in terms of lyrical content, in the U.S. in the 19th century or even the 20th, albeit in what the notes describe as "horse and buggy days." "Jay Gould's Daughter" references the famous American robber baron (1836-1892); "Jesse James" recounts the murder of the famous American outlaw (1847-1882); and "The Titanic Disaster" looks back only to 1912. Whether or not there is a traceable historical person or event, however, the songs tell stories of love, adventure, and criminality, siding with the poor and disadvantaged over the rich and privileged. Exemplary among them are John Henry, the steel driver who defeats the automated steel drill, but in so doing breaks his heart and dies, and the cabin boy in "The Golden Vanity" who sinks the rival Turkish Revelee by boring a hole in the ship's hull, but then is betrayed by his own captain and drowns. The main characters of the songs often come to bad ends, but they remain folk heroes, and Seeger sings their stories straightforwardly, preserving their memories long after their deaths. ~ William Ruhlmann
€9.99

Folk - Released January 1, 1957 | Folkways Records

€14.99

Folk - Released January 1, 1957 | Universal Music New Zealand Limited

€14.99
€9.99

Folk - Released August 19, 1957 | Tradition Records

Hi-Res
The instantly recognizable tenor of legendary folksinger Glenn Yarbrough -- the voice of the Limeliters and eventually Coca-Cola -- launches into a three-quarter time version of "Waltzing Matilda" without the slightest bit of irony on 1957's Come Sit by My Side. His second recording (the first arrived in 1951) was a veritable set list for what was to become the folk revival, and it remains one of the most definitive recordings of the genre. While a much sparser affair than the high-harmony Limeliters records that were to follow, Yarbrough instills each track, from staples like the "Banks of the Ohio" and "Dark as a Dungeon" to more obscure English offerings such as "All 'Round My Hat," with the kind supernatural innocence and charm that would inform the approach of numerous '60s revival groups like the New Christy Minstrels and the Serendipity Singers. ~ James Christopher Monger
€9.99

Folk - Released January 1, 1958 | Folkways Records

Genre

Folk in the magazine
  • A folk journey
    A folk journey After Didn’t It Rain, the beautiful American blue-eyed blonde releases her second solo album on the label Yep Roc. This Too Shall Light is a sublime spiritual journey produced by the indispensable ...
  • We say Yes to Michael Nau !
    We say Yes to Michael Nau ! Michael Nau has well and truly taken off since his departure from Page France and Cotton Jones.
  • Olivia Chaney, folk pop full of grace
    Olivia Chaney, folk pop full of grace A graduate from England’s Royal Academy of Music and a seasoned singer, pianist Olivia Chaney had already received rave reviews with her 2015 first album The Longest River.
  • First Aid Kit, once upon a time in America...
    First Aid Kit, once upon a time in America... When they released The Big Black And The Blue in 2010, Johanna and Klara Söderberg were 20 and 23 years old respectively. The two Swedish sisters quickly made a name for themselves at the top of the charts thanks to their covers of songs by Fleet Foxes, Lorde, Jack White and even Black Sabbath… T...