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Classical - Released March 15, 2019 | Sony Classical

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Film Soundtracks - Released January 13, 2017 | Sony Classical

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Film Soundtracks - Released December 16, 2020 | WaterTower Music

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Film Soundtracks - Released July 9, 2010 | Reprise - WaterTower

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Classical - Released November 1, 2019 | Sony Classical

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Film Soundtracks - Released January 12, 2018 | Morgan Creek Music Group

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Film Soundtracks - Released May 11, 2017 | Geek Music

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Film Soundtracks - Released November 25, 2003 | Elektra Records

Hans Zimmer's score for Edward Zwick's samurai epic The Last Samurai mixes his own densely composed style with Japanese instruments and melodies, resulting in a brooding, atmospheric collection of music. Shakuhachi and other flutes, koto, and taiko drums make their presence known throughout the score, most effectively on compositions like "A Way of Life," which begins as a reflective duet for flute and strings before swelling into an ominous but majestic melody. "Spectres in the Fog" is another compelling mix of beauty and violence, starting with a delicate koto melody and rolling drums before crashing percussion and sawing strings turn the mood from bittersweet to battle-ready. These drums of war and battle cries increase as the score unfolds, making tracks such as "Safe Passage," "Ronin," and "Red Warrior" nearly as tense and striking outside of the film's context as they are in it. The score's quieter moments are just as thoughtfully crafted, with "Taken," "A Hard Teacher," and "Idyll's End" adding restraint and balancing the more explosive tracks. The Last Samurai flows from track to track seamlessly; indeed, its lengthy, multi-part compositions give it the feel of one long, shifting composition. Its Asian melodies and emphasis on percussion are reminiscent of Tan Dun's score for Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon, but this score is both more somber and more lush, particularly on its closing pieces, "The Way of the Sword" and "A Small Measure of Peace." Both of these tracks mix gravity and hope into a somber conclusion to a somber but expertly crafted score that ranks among Zimmer's finest work. © TiVo
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Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 2013 | Walt Disney Records

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Classical - Released March 15, 2019 | Sony Classical

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Film Soundtracks - Released December 6, 2005 | Rhino - Warner Records

This one isn't too hard to figure. Big-budget action film producer Jerry Bruckheimer, looking at the receipts for Titanic, must have had his staff search the history books for another big disaster that could be turned into a similar romance-with-special-effects, and they came up with the 1941 Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. Perfect: That allowed for war footage akin to Saving Private Ryan. The hiring of director Michael Bay must have seemed obvious, at least to Bruckheimer, who had him handle Armageddon, which also featured Ben Affleck, here moving up to above-the-title star status. And finally, there's the soundtrack album, which had to feature a big end-title ballad in which a woman sang to her dead lover. Who else to write it but heartbreak ballad queen Diane Warren, and who else to sing it but diva-of-the-moment Faith Hill? Mix the elements, open it on Memorial Day weekend, and wait for the receipts to pour in. Not surprisingly, however, Pearl Harbor is no Titanic, Hill is no Celine Dion, and "There You'll Be" is no "My Heart Will Go On," though all of them do reasonable enough imitations to get by. Like the Titanic soundtrack album, this one has just the one pop song, followed by excerpts from Hans Zimmer's score. Zimmer is no James Horner, either, but his music is relentlessly slow and wistful, suggesting a film in which the action is a long time coming. Four straight tracks of dirge-like orchestral music topped by the wordless vocals of Julia Migenes go by before "Attack" signals that the fight has begun, and even that track falls off into a becalmed passage before long. Just before the end, "War" works up some martial pacing, but only to give the score an appropriately majestic sendoff. Like the film, the music seems recycled. © TiVo
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Film Soundtracks - Released June 12, 2013 | Sony Classical

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Film Soundtracks - Released October 14, 2016 | Sony Classical

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Film Soundtracks - Released February 2, 2018 | Geek Music

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Film Soundtracks - Released August 9, 2010 | Reprise - WaterTower

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Film Soundtracks - Released January 11, 1999 | RCA Victor

Hans Zimmer's Oscar-nominated score for reclusive director Terrence Malick's ambitious James Jones adaptation -- only the director's third film in 25 years -- is one of his most subtle and sophisticated yet. Then again, it's not as if the German-born composer has ever been known as a master of bombast or overstatement -- Max Steiner he is not (among other works, he penned the award-winning soundtracks for Rain Man and The Lion King). Unlike the scores for most other war movies (The Thin Red Line is set during World War II), the action in Malick's elegiac epic is driven mostly by the action itself (heated exchanges between characters, sudden eruptions of devastating violence) and not the music. The soundtrack, which consists primarily of long, string-laden pieces, also includes one of the film's mesmerizing chants, which were so popular that a separate recording, Chants From The Thin Red Line, consisting entirely of chants by the Melanesian Brotherhood and the Choir of All Saints, was released in conjunction with this recording. © Kathleen C. Fennessy /TiVo
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Film Soundtracks - Released January 9, 2006 | Varese Sarabande

In recent years the name of movie composer Hans Zimmer has become synonymous with that of director Christopher Nolan. Those who have come to know Zimmer through his dark, moody, bombastic scores to Nolan's films like The Dark Knight and Inception might be surprised by his work on The Holiday. His score for this Christmas-themed romantic comedy by writer/director Nancy Meyers starring Cameron Diaz, Jude Law, Kate Winslet, and Jack Black is appropriately playful, gentle, and infused with holiday spirit. © Sergey Mesenov /TiVo
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Film Soundtracks - Released July 24, 2015 | Remote Control

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Film Soundtracks - Released April 17, 2018 | Geek Music

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Soundtracks - Released June 1, 2010 | Activision

Composer

Hans Zimmer in the magazine