Categories :
Qobuz’s experts gather all the essentials of each genre. These albums have marked music history and become major landmarks.

With the Ideal Discography you (re)discover legendary recordings, all whilst building on your musical knowledge.

Albums

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Electronic - Released May 3, 2010 | Warp Records

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LFO

Techno - Released July 26, 2009 | Warp Records

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Electronic - Released March 5, 2007 | Warp Records

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Techno - Released October 2, 2006 | Warp Records

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Electronic - Released June 11, 2001 | Warp Records

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Warp's second 2001 release by a stateside producer (after Richard Devine's Lip Switch) is one of the most enjoyable works of experimental techno heard in several years, a combination of tough, underground hip-hop and the fractured neo-electro of Warp favorites Autechre and Plaid. Scott Herren, the lone figure behind releases as Delarosa & Asora, Savath & Savalas, and Prefuse 73, constructs raw breakbeat tracks, cutting and splicing vocals, beats, and pianos over and over until what may previously have been a straight-ahead hip-hop rhythm track gets reconstructed into a symphony of deeply groovy musique concrète. Herren calls on the raw repetition of DJ Premier and the catchy finesse of Timbaland to create a collection of tracks that could appeal to fans of DMX just as well as AFX. Just slightly more experimental than the increasingly fractured productions you'd hear on a mainstream rap station, Vocal Studies + Uprock Narratives is also much more fun than the notoriously academic cast of techno producers led by Autechre and Richard Devine. © John Bush /TiVo
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Trip Hop - Released April 12, 1999 | Warp Records

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Four years on from Smoker's Delight and, fortunately, little has changed for George Evelyn's Nightmares on Wax project. While he could've easily been forgiven for following the nu-beat crowd and inserting a few prescient big beats into the blunted trip-hop formula, it's all clear from the opener, "Les Nuits" (a NoW theme of sorts, repeated from Smoker's Delight), that at hand is a return to form, not a turn away from the trip-hop style that took such a beating during the late '90s. The lazy-day soul samples driving tracks like "Morse" and "Finer" are perfect examples that instrumental hip-hop doesn't have to resort to the usual producer's bag of tricks to make for music leagues beyond the average. There's also a focus here lacking from previous material; fewer interludes make for a more concentrated listening experience. All in all, Carboot Soul is one of the best arguments yet for the continuing development of trip-hop beyond mere coffee table fare. © John Bush /TiVo
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Electronic - Released October 19, 1998 | Warp Records

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Two Lone Swordsmen is another project involving Andrew Weatherall, who has consistently proven himself equally talented with production and composition; Stay Down is not as rock-oriented as much of his work, taking its cues instead from dub and ambient soundscapes, but without abandoning Weatherall's C-86 and Manchester house roots. Stay Down's fusion of all four influences is nothing short of amazing, taking largely electronic sounds into areas far more composed than the typically repetitive club-oriented releases that dominate some areas of the genre -- rather than leading electronic sounds down the path of their own conventions, the album shapes them into compositions that could just as easily be performed on organic instruments, meaning that the use of intricate production and sound manipulation is really just the texture of the recording, rather than its raison d'etre. It's an approach that's not used as often as many listeners might wish -- and as Stay Down once again demonstrates, it's an approach that typically makes for excellent albums. © Nitsuh Abebe /TiVo
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Trip Hop - Released April 20, 1998 | Warp Records

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Although Boards of Canada's blueprint for electronic listening music -- aching electro-synth with mid-tempo hip-hop beats and occasional light scratching -- isn't quite a revolution in and of itself, Music Has the Right to Children is an amazing LP. Similar to the early work of Autechre and Aphex Twin, the duo is one of the few European artists who can match their American precursors with regard to a sense of spirit in otherwise electronic music. This is pure machine soul, reminiscent of some forgotten Japanese animation soundtrack or a rusting Commodore 64 just about to give up the ghost. Alternating broadly sketched works with minute-long vignettes (the latter of which comprise several of the best tracks on the album), Music Has the Right to Children is one of the best electronic releases of 1998. © John Bush /TiVo
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Ambient - Released October 27, 1997 | Warp Records

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Plaid's second full-length release, Not for Threes, is separated from its predecessor by one of the most celebrated side trips in electronic listening music's brief but broad history. As members of the Black Dog, Ed Handley and Andy Turner (together with Ken Downie) helped set the standard for experimental techno, bringing a daring range of influences together in a space consistently characterized by quality and innovation. As such, great things were expected of Threes, and with a couple exceptions, the pair delivers. Although treading far closer than any Black Dog material ever did to the sort of pop electronica of Plaid's interim work with Björk (who appears here on the gorgeous "Lilith"), Threes is ambitious on different terms, moving from the abused and distorted breaks of "Extork" and "Prague Radio" to a balanced radio-friendliness that never sacrifices ingenuity for ease. A handful of tracks feature vocals throughout, and while the results had the predictable effect of irritating BD purists, they actually work remarkably well (partly because the tracks contain absolutely no trace of compositional compromise). A few of the tracks ("Headspin," "Abla Eedio," the too-brief "Seph") sit easily beside the very best Black Dog. © Sean Cooper /TiVo
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Drum & Bass - Released November 4, 1996 | Warp Records

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Techno - Released January 29, 1996 | Warp Records

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Nearly legendary as the album-that-almost-never-happened, Advance was a full five years in the making, with hardly a peep of new material in between. The result isn't as essential as their debut, but growth and maturity are evident, particularly in the focus and depth of composition. The material flows nicely, with the heavier, more body-oriented material broken up by contemplative, atmospheric ambient interludes. © Sean Cooper /TiVo
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Trip Hop - Released September 25, 1995 | Warp Records

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George Evelyn's solo step as Nightmares on Wax, Smokers Delight, is a whole delightfully irreducible to its parts, which, as with earlier releases, is largely electro, hip-hop, and soul, with bits of Latin percussion and down-tempo funk thrown in. The album spawned a pair of somewhat forgettable remix EPs and was reissued by TVT immediately upon release. © Sean Cooper /TiVo

Techno - Released February 13, 1995 | Warp Records

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Techno - Released February 8, 1994 | Warp Records

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Larkin's work has evidenced a sharp turn away from the dancefloor, incorporating compositional elements of ambient and armchair techno, while remaining true at least in spirit to his roots. Azimuth is a pretty successful example of this trend, although the combination works best on tracks such as "Funk in Space" where rhythmic play is given fuller reign. © Sean Cooper /TiVo
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Techno - Released July 22, 1991 | Warp Records

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Definitive collection of the new style electro-techno, with composition and dynamics taking equal play with groove and DJ-friendliness. Reissued by Tommy Boy in the U.S., the hip-hop connection was apparent in the few breakbeat tracks, but for the most part the record leans more toward acid house and techno for its cues. Recommended. © Sean Cooper /TiVo