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Charles Mingus|The Lost Album From Ronnie Scott’s (Live)

The Lost Album From Ronnie Scott’s (Live)

Charles Mingus

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Beset with personal and professional difficulties from the 1960s on, Charles Mingus' fortunes turned in 1970. He assembled a new band and began recording -- the seminal Let My Children Hear Music -- and touring again. Beneath the Underdog, his long-awaited autobiography, was published in 1971 to rapturous acclaim. The sextet for the recoding -- veteran saxophonists Charles McPherson and Bobby Jones, pianist John Foster, drummer Roy Brooks, and 19-year-old trumpeter Jon Faddis -- were booked at Ronnie Scott's for two-and-a-half weeks during a summer European tour. The last two nights were professionally recorded by a mobile unit. Mingus also cut a couple of edits and packaged them with the concert tapes, which have been discreetly spliced in. In 1973, Columbia dropped all its jazz artists (except Miles Davis) from its roster, leaving these tapes to rot in a vault for 50 years. They have been painstakingly restored to full fidelity by George Klabin and Fran Gala. The physical package, released on Mingus' 100th birthday, underscores this release's historic import. Its large booklet contains biographer Brian Priestly's excellent historical essay plus 1972 interviews with Mingus and McPherson. Producer Zev Feldman interviews Sue Mingus, McPherson, Fran Lebowitz, Christian McBride, Eddie Gomez, and Mary Scott, Ronnie's widow. Rare photos are also included. This band captures Mingus' '70s aesthetic perfectly. The epic-length opener "Orange Was the Color of Her Dress, Then Silk Blues" melds gutbucket party music to gospel with panoramic colors, dynamic textures, and exploratory improvisation. Foster repeatedly engages "Ysabel's Table Dance" from Tijuana Moods, while the bassist is in excellent interplay with McPherson and Jones, foreshadowing a later version on 1975's Changes Two. The 20-minute "Noddin' Ya' Head Blues" commences with a bracing, four-minute unaccompanied solo from Mingus. There is blues shouting from Foster, a dizzying, high-pitched solo from Faddis, and a soaring exchange between the pianist, the bassist, and Brooks' musical saw. "Mind Reader's Convention in Milano" travels across modalities connecting blues to North African and Latin musics. Brooks delivers a dazzling drum solo before its cacophonous hard-swinging conclusion. "Fables of Faubus" reflects Mingus' journey into modernism without forsaking bop's rhythmic advances or the influence of Ellington's elegant harmonic invention. The bassist's conversations with his sidemen lead to a long, winding solo adorned with fine arco playing. The salute to Louis Armstrong on "Pops (When the Saints Go Marching In)" finds Foster imitating the trumpeter's gruff singing voice as the sextet expand the margins of the root tune with alacrity and humor, while Jones delivers a killer clarinet break and Faddis' solo reveals a debt to NOLA's jazz tradition. "The Man Who Never Sleeps" is introduced by the trumpeter's dirtiest, loosest -- and arguably most soulful -- playing. The saxophone solos are comped wonderfully by Foster, as Brooks breaks and double-times with enthusiastic swing. The set closes with a brief, athletic, modernist read of Benny Goodman's and Charlie Christian's "Air Mail Special." While The Lost Album wasn't actually missing, it was abandoned to history on a dusty shelf. Thankfully, it's been resurrected to cast favorable light on Mingus' creative renaissance.
© Thom Jurek /TiVo

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The Lost Album From Ronnie Scott’s (Live)

Charles Mingus

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1
Introduction (Live)
00:01:01

Charles Mingus, Composer, Writer, MainArtist

© 2022 Resonance Records ℗ 2022 Resonance Records

2
Orange Was the Color of Her Dress (Then Silk Blues) (Live)
00:30:44

Charles Mingus, Composer, Writer, MainArtist

© 2022 Resonance Records ℗ 2022 Resonance Records

3
Noddin' Ya Head Blues (Live)
00:19:52

Charles Mingus, Composer, Writer, MainArtist

© 2022 Resonance Records ℗ 2022 Resonance Records

4
Mind-Readers' Convention in Milano (AKA Number 29) (Live)
00:29:57

Charles Mingus, Composer, Writer, MainArtist

© 2022 Resonance Records ℗ 2022 Resonance Records

5
Ko Ko (Theme) (Live)
00:00:44

Charlie Parker, Composer, Writer - Charles Mingus, MainArtist

© 2022 Resonance Records ℗ 2022 Resonance Records

6
Fables of Faubus (Live)
00:35:00

Charles Mingus, Composer, Writer, MainArtist

© 2022 Resonance Records ℗ 2022 Resonance Records

7
Pops (AKA When the Saints Go Marching In) (Live)
00:07:35

Louis Armstrong, Composer, Writer - Charles Mingus, MainArtist

© 2022 Resonance Records ℗ 2022 Resonance Records

8
The Man Who Never Sleeps (Live)
00:18:33

Charles Mingus, Composer, Writer, MainArtist

© 2022 Resonance Records ℗ 2022 Resonance Records

9
Air Mail Special (Live)
00:02:02

Charles Christian, Composer, Writer - Benny Goodman, Composer, Writer - Charles Mingus, MainArtist - Jim Mundy, Composer, Writer

© 2022 Resonance Records ℗ 2022 Resonance Records

Album Description

Beset with personal and professional difficulties from the 1960s on, Charles Mingus' fortunes turned in 1970. He assembled a new band and began recording -- the seminal Let My Children Hear Music -- and touring again. Beneath the Underdog, his long-awaited autobiography, was published in 1971 to rapturous acclaim. The sextet for the recoding -- veteran saxophonists Charles McPherson and Bobby Jones, pianist John Foster, drummer Roy Brooks, and 19-year-old trumpeter Jon Faddis -- were booked at Ronnie Scott's for two-and-a-half weeks during a summer European tour. The last two nights were professionally recorded by a mobile unit. Mingus also cut a couple of edits and packaged them with the concert tapes, which have been discreetly spliced in. In 1973, Columbia dropped all its jazz artists (except Miles Davis) from its roster, leaving these tapes to rot in a vault for 50 years. They have been painstakingly restored to full fidelity by George Klabin and Fran Gala. The physical package, released on Mingus' 100th birthday, underscores this release's historic import. Its large booklet contains biographer Brian Priestly's excellent historical essay plus 1972 interviews with Mingus and McPherson. Producer Zev Feldman interviews Sue Mingus, McPherson, Fran Lebowitz, Christian McBride, Eddie Gomez, and Mary Scott, Ronnie's widow. Rare photos are also included. This band captures Mingus' '70s aesthetic perfectly. The epic-length opener "Orange Was the Color of Her Dress, Then Silk Blues" melds gutbucket party music to gospel with panoramic colors, dynamic textures, and exploratory improvisation. Foster repeatedly engages "Ysabel's Table Dance" from Tijuana Moods, while the bassist is in excellent interplay with McPherson and Jones, foreshadowing a later version on 1975's Changes Two. The 20-minute "Noddin' Ya' Head Blues" commences with a bracing, four-minute unaccompanied solo from Mingus. There is blues shouting from Foster, a dizzying, high-pitched solo from Faddis, and a soaring exchange between the pianist, the bassist, and Brooks' musical saw. "Mind Reader's Convention in Milano" travels across modalities connecting blues to North African and Latin musics. Brooks delivers a dazzling drum solo before its cacophonous hard-swinging conclusion. "Fables of Faubus" reflects Mingus' journey into modernism without forsaking bop's rhythmic advances or the influence of Ellington's elegant harmonic invention. The bassist's conversations with his sidemen lead to a long, winding solo adorned with fine arco playing. The salute to Louis Armstrong on "Pops (When the Saints Go Marching In)" finds Foster imitating the trumpeter's gruff singing voice as the sextet expand the margins of the root tune with alacrity and humor, while Jones delivers a killer clarinet break and Faddis' solo reveals a debt to NOLA's jazz tradition. "The Man Who Never Sleeps" is introduced by the trumpeter's dirtiest, loosest -- and arguably most soulful -- playing. The saxophone solos are comped wonderfully by Foster, as Brooks breaks and double-times with enthusiastic swing. The set closes with a brief, athletic, modernist read of Benny Goodman's and Charlie Christian's "Air Mail Special." While The Lost Album wasn't actually missing, it was abandoned to history on a dusty shelf. Thankfully, it's been resurrected to cast favorable light on Mingus' creative renaissance.
© Thom Jurek /TiVo

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