Qobuz Store wallpaper
Categories:
Cart 0

Your cart is empty

Jimmy Page - No Quarter

Mes favoris

Cet élément a bien été ajouté / retiré de vos favoris.

No Quarter

Jimmy Page, Robert Plant

Available in
16-Bit CD Quality 44.1 kHz - Stereo

Unlimited Streaming

Listen to this album in high quality now on our apps

Start my trial period and start listening to this album

Enjoy this album on Qobuz apps with your subscription

Subscribe

Enjoy this album on Qobuz apps with your subscription

Digital Download

Purchase and download this album in a wide variety of formats depending on your needs.

Ever since Led Zeppelin parted ways after the death of drummer John Bonham, fans were clamoring for the mighty band to reunite. This willfully ignored both the vital contribution Bonham gave to the group's mystique and Zeppelin's woeful one-off reunion at the 1985 Live Aid charity concert, but the legend of the band was so strong, reunion rumors reached a fever pitch whenever vocalist Robert Plant or guitarist Jimmy Page had a new album in the stores. In 1994, following Plant's moody, misunderstood 1993 album Fate of Nations and Page's widely lambasted collaboration with Whitesnake singer David Coverdale, the two quietly reunited to record a concert for MTV's then-popular acoustic concert series Unplugged. Page & Plant interpreted the Unplugged moniker rather liberally, bringing in a full orchestra, mandolins, and a hurdy-gurdy among other instruments, and Page turned to an electric guitar on occasion. Nevertheless, the "unplugged" setting did give the duo an opportunity to gracefully back away from the bombast that was assumed to be Zeppelin's stock-in-trade; after all, it would have been very hard to do "Whole Lotta Love," "Dazed and Confused," or "Trampled Underfoot" in this setting. Instead, this gives them a chance to dive into the moodiest material, trading heavily on the folk, blues, and world music that gave Led Zeppelin a richness unheard in their heavy rock peers. This might not be what some diehards were expecting from a reunion, but it was a gutsy move from Page & Plant, and the ensuing album, No Quarter, has aged remarkably well. That's not to say that it's timeless music, or a latter-day comeback on the level of Bob Dylan's Love and Theft, but this is ambitiously atmospheric, restless music by musicians not content to rest on their laurels. They do draw heavily from their past, but these new versions of classic Led Zeppelin songs sound reinvigorated in these new arrangements. At times, this means that the songs are given rather drastic reinterpretations -- "Nobody's Fault but Mine" brings the brooding undercurrent of the original to the surface, "Four Sticks" sounds livelier in this spare setting -- while other tunes sound similar to the recorded versions but are given spirited readings ("That's the Way," "The Battle of Evermore," "Gallows Pole"). Between these revived Zeppelin numbers are a few new songs, all ambitious and solid, fitting right into the vibe of the album; even if they don't match the older tunes, they're respectable and gain strength upon repeated listens. As good as much of No Quarter is, it isn't necessarily the kind of record that invites those repeated listens. At its core, it's an experiment, the sound of two middle-aged musicians looking back at their groundbreaking work and finding both sustenance and inspiration there. That makes for fascinating listening, both upon the first spin and a return play several years later, but it doesn't necessarily make for an album that's played all that often. [Upon its original 1994 release No Quarter contained 13 tracks. Several years later, it was reissued overseas, adding the previously unreleased original "Wah Wah" as a bonus track. Upon the album's tenth anniversary, it was reissued in the U.S. with "Wah Wah," plus the previously unreleased "The Rain Song," which took the place of "Thank You," which was cut from the album on this reissue. Finally, the 2004 reissue retitled the original "Yallah" as "The Truth Explodes."]
© Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo

More info

No Quarter

Jimmy Page

launch qobuz app I already downloaded Qobuz for Windows / MacOS Open

download qobuz app I have not downloaded Qobuz for Windows / MacOS yet Download the Qobuz app

Copy the following link to share it

You are currently listening to samples.

Listen to over 70 million songs with an unlimited streaming plan.

Listen to this album and more than 70 million songs with your unlimited streaming plans.

1
Nobody's Fault But Mine
00:04:06

Robert Plant, Producer, MainArtist, ComposerLyricist - Jimmy Page, Producer, MainArtist, ComposerLyricist

℗ 1994 Mercury Records Limited

2
Thank You
00:05:48

Robert Plant, Producer, MainArtist, ComposerLyricist - Jimmy Page, Producer, MainArtist, ComposerLyricist

℗ 1994 Mercury Records Limited

3
No Quarter
00:03:45

Robert Plant, Producer, MainArtist, ComposerLyricist - Jimmy Page, Producer, MainArtist, ComposerLyricist - John Paul Jones, ComposerLyricist

℗ 1994 Mercury Records Limited

4
Friends
00:04:36

Robert Plant, Producer, MainArtist, ComposerLyricist - Jimmy Page, Producer, MainArtist, ComposerLyricist

℗ 1994 Mercury Records Limited

5
Yallah
00:04:59

Robert Plant, Producer, MainArtist, ComposerLyricist - Jimmy Page, Producer, MainArtist, ComposerLyricist

℗ 1994 Mercury Records Limited

6
City Don't Cry
00:06:08

Robert Plant, Producer, MainArtist, ComposerLyricist - Jimmy Page, Producer, MainArtist, ComposerLyricist

℗ 1994 Mercury Records Limited

7
Since I've Been Loving You
00:07:30

Robert Plant, Producer, MainArtist, ComposerLyricist - Jimmy Page, Producer, MainArtist, ComposerLyricist - John Paul Jones, ComposerLyricist

℗ 1994 Mercury Records Limited

8
Battle Of Evermore
00:06:41

Robert Plant, Producer, MainArtist, ComposerLyricist - Jimmy Page, Producer, MainArtist, ComposerLyricist

℗ 1994 Mercury Records Limited

9
Wonderful One
00:04:57

Robert Plant, Producer, MainArtist, ComposerLyricist - Jimmy Page, Producer, MainArtist, ComposerLyricist

℗ 1994 Mercury Records Limited

10
Wah Wah
00:03:59

Robert Plant, Producer, MainArtist, ComposerLyricist - Jimmy Page, Producer, MainArtist, ComposerLyricist

℗ 1994 Mercury Records Limited

11
That's The Way
00:05:35

Robert Plant, Producer, MainArtist, ComposerLyricist - Jimmy Page, Producer, MainArtist, ComposerLyricist

℗ 1994 Mercury Records Limited

12
Gallows Pole
00:04:09

Traditional, ComposerLyricist - Robert Plant, Producer, Arranger, Work Arranger, MainArtist - Jimmy Page, Producer, Arranger, Work Arranger, MainArtist

℗ 1994 Mercury Records Limited

13
Four Sticks
00:04:52

Robert Plant, Producer, MainArtist, ComposerLyricist - Jimmy Page, Producer, MainArtist, ComposerLyricist

℗ 1994 Mercury Records Limited

14
Kashmir
00:12:27

Robert Plant, Producer, MainArtist, ComposerLyricist - Jimmy Page, Producer, MainArtist, ComposerLyricist - John Bonham, ComposerLyricist

℗ 1994 Mercury Records Limited

Album Description

Ever since Led Zeppelin parted ways after the death of drummer John Bonham, fans were clamoring for the mighty band to reunite. This willfully ignored both the vital contribution Bonham gave to the group's mystique and Zeppelin's woeful one-off reunion at the 1985 Live Aid charity concert, but the legend of the band was so strong, reunion rumors reached a fever pitch whenever vocalist Robert Plant or guitarist Jimmy Page had a new album in the stores. In 1994, following Plant's moody, misunderstood 1993 album Fate of Nations and Page's widely lambasted collaboration with Whitesnake singer David Coverdale, the two quietly reunited to record a concert for MTV's then-popular acoustic concert series Unplugged. Page & Plant interpreted the Unplugged moniker rather liberally, bringing in a full orchestra, mandolins, and a hurdy-gurdy among other instruments, and Page turned to an electric guitar on occasion. Nevertheless, the "unplugged" setting did give the duo an opportunity to gracefully back away from the bombast that was assumed to be Zeppelin's stock-in-trade; after all, it would have been very hard to do "Whole Lotta Love," "Dazed and Confused," or "Trampled Underfoot" in this setting. Instead, this gives them a chance to dive into the moodiest material, trading heavily on the folk, blues, and world music that gave Led Zeppelin a richness unheard in their heavy rock peers. This might not be what some diehards were expecting from a reunion, but it was a gutsy move from Page & Plant, and the ensuing album, No Quarter, has aged remarkably well. That's not to say that it's timeless music, or a latter-day comeback on the level of Bob Dylan's Love and Theft, but this is ambitiously atmospheric, restless music by musicians not content to rest on their laurels. They do draw heavily from their past, but these new versions of classic Led Zeppelin songs sound reinvigorated in these new arrangements. At times, this means that the songs are given rather drastic reinterpretations -- "Nobody's Fault but Mine" brings the brooding undercurrent of the original to the surface, "Four Sticks" sounds livelier in this spare setting -- while other tunes sound similar to the recorded versions but are given spirited readings ("That's the Way," "The Battle of Evermore," "Gallows Pole"). Between these revived Zeppelin numbers are a few new songs, all ambitious and solid, fitting right into the vibe of the album; even if they don't match the older tunes, they're respectable and gain strength upon repeated listens. As good as much of No Quarter is, it isn't necessarily the kind of record that invites those repeated listens. At its core, it's an experiment, the sound of two middle-aged musicians looking back at their groundbreaking work and finding both sustenance and inspiration there. That makes for fascinating listening, both upon the first spin and a return play several years later, but it doesn't necessarily make for an album that's played all that often. [Upon its original 1994 release No Quarter contained 13 tracks. Several years later, it was reissued overseas, adding the previously unreleased original "Wah Wah" as a bonus track. Upon the album's tenth anniversary, it was reissued in the U.S. with "Wah Wah," plus the previously unreleased "The Rain Song," which took the place of "Thank You," which was cut from the album on this reissue. Finally, the 2004 reissue retitled the original "Yallah" as "The Truth Explodes."]
© Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo

About the album

Distinctions:

Improve this page

Qobuz logo Why buy on Qobuz...

On sale now...

Crime Of The Century [2014 - HD Remaster]

Supertramp

Ommadawn

Mike Oldfield

Ommadawn Mike Oldfield

The Snow Goose

Camel

Aqualung

Jethro Tull

Aqualung Jethro Tull
More on Qobuz
By Jimmy Page

Live at the Greek

Jimmy Page

Live at the Greek Jimmy Page

Outrider

Jimmy Page

Outrider Jimmy Page

Burn Up

Jimmy Page

Burn Up Jimmy Page

The Very Best of Jimmy Page, John Paul Jones and John Bonham

Jimmy Page

She Just Satisfies/Keep Moving

Jimmy Page

You may also like...

I Still Have Faith In You / Don't Shut Me Down

Abba

Random Access Memories (Hi-Res Version)

Daft Punk

Chemtrails Over The Country Club

Lana Del Rey

Reprise

Moby

Reprise Moby

...‘Til We Meet Again - Live

Norah Jones

In your panoramas...
The British Blues Boom, Chronicle of a Revolution

If Joe Bonamassa has come back with British Blues Explosion, a year after the Rolling Stones’ Blue And Lonesome, it has cemented the fact that the British Blues Boom was more than just a trend. More than a simple musical trend, it was the interest of a younger generation for the great American blues idols that had been ignored in their country, which led to a real revolution, with three major agitators leading the charge, Eric Clapton, Jeff Beck and Jimmy Page, considered in the UK as the “Holy Trinity” of rock and guitar. If they were far from being the only musicians involved, it is through their respective careers that we have discovered that blues, far from being an outdated musical genre, is some kind of getaway to other musical areas and has allowed for endless innovations.

And then Nirvana Killed Rock

In 1987, Nirvana was born: the most unexpected punk swerve of the end of the 20th century. A rocketing career, international hits, hordes of fans and a tragic epilogue for this worldwide phenomenon. And what if Kurt Cobain’s band was none other than the last band in the history of rock? The ultimate generational phenomenon of genre, if not its last myth.

Led Zeppelin: 50 Years of Rock

In 2018, Led Zeppelin celebrated their 50th birthday, but the only "present" on offer is a beautiful book which will come out on sale in Autumn. After having made their mark on the history of rock in just 12 years, Jimmy Page, Robert Plant and John Paul Jones have often reunited on stage and in the studio after the death of drummer John Bonham in 1980, with varying degrees of success. Let's take a look back at Led Zep's different comebacks, which we hope might throw up some nice ideas for a really good birthday concert...

In the news...