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Oumou Sangare - Acoustic

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Acoustic

Oumou Sangare

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The aptly named Acoustic shows us a stripped back side of the queen of Malian song. Recorded in live takes over two intense days in the studio, she revisits her 2017 album Mogoya for the third time which, the following year, was remixed by the likes of St. Germain, François, The Atlas Mountain and even Spoek Mathombo. There is no electronic interference here, just Guimba Kouyaté’s sensitive guitar, her faithful musical companion Brahima "Benogo" Diakité’s kamélé n'goni and Vincent Taurelle’s organ and celesta, which were involved in the original album, enveloping the diva’s unique voice and the voices of her backing singers Emma Lamadji and Kandy Guira. The effect is stunning – never has Oumou Sangaré’s vibrant presence felt so close.


Driven by this intimate atmosphere, Oumou insisted on adding two very personal tracks to the nine songs on Mogoya - two symbolic tracks from her magnificent career. Originally released in 1993, Saa Magni acts as a tribute to the late arranger Amadou Ba Guindo, one of her earliest supporters. The second added track is Diaraby Nene, without a doubt her most iconic song. Written when she was a teenager, she opens up to the emotions surrounding her first love. Breaking taboos in a traditionally patriarchal society, she’s made a few enemies but has also won the unconditional support of the younger generations and has become a leading voice for feminism, a fight she has never given up on. © Benjamin MiNiMuM/Qobuz

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Acoustic

Oumou Sangare

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1
Kamelemba Acoustic
00:05:44

Oumou Sangare, Composer, MainArtist

2020 No Format 2020 No Format

2
Fadjamou Acoustic
00:04:04

Oumou Sangare, Composer, MainArtist

2020 No Format 2020 No Format

3
Diaraby Nene Acoustic
00:07:01

Oumou Sangare, Composer, MainArtist

2020 No Format 2020 No Format

4
Minata Waraba Acoustic
00:04:51

Oumou Sangare, Composer, MainArtist

2020 No Format 2020 No Format

5
Saa Magni Acoustic
00:05:31

Oumou Sangare, Composer, MainArtist

2020 No Format 2020 No Format

6
Bena Bena Acoustic
00:04:30

Oumou Sangare, Composer, MainArtist

2020 No Format 2020 No Format

7
Kounkoun Acoustic
00:05:11

Oumou Sangare, Composer, MainArtist

2020 No Format 2020 No Format

8
Djoukourou Acoustic
00:03:21

Oumou Sangare, Composer, MainArtist

2020 No Format 2020 No Format

9
Yere Faga Acoustic
00:04:51

Oumou Sangare, Composer, MainArtist

2020 No Format 2020 No Format

10
Mali Niale Acoustic
00:05:32

Oumou Sangare, Composer, MainArtist

2020 No Format 2020 No Format

11
Mogoya Acoustic
00:04:43

Oumou Sangare, Composer, MainArtist

2020 No Format 2020 No Format

Album Description

The aptly named Acoustic shows us a stripped back side of the queen of Malian song. Recorded in live takes over two intense days in the studio, she revisits her 2017 album Mogoya for the third time which, the following year, was remixed by the likes of St. Germain, François, The Atlas Mountain and even Spoek Mathombo. There is no electronic interference here, just Guimba Kouyaté’s sensitive guitar, her faithful musical companion Brahima "Benogo" Diakité’s kamélé n'goni and Vincent Taurelle’s organ and celesta, which were involved in the original album, enveloping the diva’s unique voice and the voices of her backing singers Emma Lamadji and Kandy Guira. The effect is stunning – never has Oumou Sangaré’s vibrant presence felt so close.


Driven by this intimate atmosphere, Oumou insisted on adding two very personal tracks to the nine songs on Mogoya - two symbolic tracks from her magnificent career. Originally released in 1993, Saa Magni acts as a tribute to the late arranger Amadou Ba Guindo, one of her earliest supporters. The second added track is Diaraby Nene, without a doubt her most iconic song. Written when she was a teenager, she opens up to the emotions surrounding her first love. Breaking taboos in a traditionally patriarchal society, she’s made a few enemies but has also won the unconditional support of the younger generations and has become a leading voice for feminism, a fight she has never given up on. © Benjamin MiNiMuM/Qobuz

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