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Drum & Bass - Released October 23, 2020 | Timesig

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Electronic - Released December 6, 2019 | Timesig

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Electronic - Released July 26, 2019 | Timesig

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Electronic - Released July 26, 2019 | Timesig

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Electronic - Released November 2, 2018 | Timesig

Previously known for creating his dense, chaotic sound tapestries with multiple laptops, professional sound designer and electronic musician Richard Devine spent much of the 2010s building up an unfathomably large, overwhelming modular synth system. 2018's Sort\Lave collects a dozen compositions created entirely using Eurorack and Nord G2 modular units. The pieces are sprawling and spontaneous, and while it's clear that Devine is a master of electronic sound construction, one can tell that he's continually discovering new sounds and rhythms, and his sense of excitement and bewilderment is more audible here than on his other albums. The album begins with "Microscopium Recurse," a 12-minute arrhythmic exploration that has far more in common with musique concrete than IDM. An endless procession of jolts, burbles, twists, and cartoonish effects, it sounds hyper-focused rather than random or algorithmically generated. The majority of the other tracks are beat-driven, although the beats are blurred and stuttered to the point of near obliteration on tracks like "k-0." The somewhat concise "Astra" develops a spacy, wonderstruck atmosphere around its ever-mutating beats, and the grinding, fuzzy "Pngtrk" manages to express a burning sense of machine joy. "Opaque Ke" comes close to a techno bounce without quite touching the floor, and "Eylansec" starts out closer to electro before being swept away in an analog flood. © Paul Simpson /TiVo
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Electronic - Released May 4, 2018 | Timesig

Superproducer Daniel Lanois first expressed interest in collaborating with breakcore artist Venetian Snares (Aaron Funk) after hearing the latter's 2005 masterpiece, Rossz Csillag Alatt Született. The two musicians began recording improvised sessions in 2016, and premiered their collaboration with a 2017 live performance at The Great Hall in Toronto, which quickly sold out in advance. Their first album together is an uneasy but fascinating soundclash, with Funk's modular synthesizers and tumultuous breakbeats offset by Lanois' soothing pedal steel vistas, rather than the menacing textures or rave hallucinations usually heard on Venetian Snares recordings. Pieces often start with soft, rolling waves of steel guitar before impossibly complex drum programming blasts in and disrupts everything, pitting a graceful glide against gnarled chaos. Funk also processes and distorts Lanois' guitar playing in real time, transforming it from rays of golden light into an apocalyptic hellstorm. It gets no more brutal than "Mothors Pressroll P131," an onslaught of acid gabber with some of the hardest, nastiest breaks Funk has delivered in years. "Night MXCMPV1 P74" is much calmer, with soothing guitar and synths forming a blanket around the scattered yet controlled micro-breaks, which sometimes sound like softly breaking glass. At 33 minutes, the album is an intense but abrupt ride, with both musicians soaring into bold new territories. For dedicated fans who couldn't get enough, pre-orders of the album were bundled with a bonus disc containing eight additional tracks from the same sessions, which are just as mindblowing as the album proper, if not more so. © Paul Simpson /TiVo
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Electronic - Released June 16, 2017 | Timesig

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Electronic - Released August 19, 2016 | Timesig

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Electronic - Released August 19, 2016 | Timesig

System is the first full-length release in a decade by New York-based synthesizer fiend Joseph Fraioli under his Datach'i guise. Since his mid-2000s releases for the now defunct Sublight label, Fraioli has devoted much time to his award-winning audio design company, Jafbox Sound, which has provided sound for numerous advertisements, television programs, and short films. Fraioli had spent years building up a modular synthesizer setup, posting several demonstration videos online. Aaron Funk (Venetian Snares), another IDM veteran who had become enamored with modular synths, was excited by Fraioli's work and expressed interest in releasing a new Datach'i album on his Timesig imprint. As with all of Datach'i's albums, System shows a significant growth from his previous releases, yet it stays true to his unique, innovative vision. His production remains as detailed and technical as ever, but he continues to inject an enormous amount of spirit and sentimentality into his intense audio constructions. The tone isn't quite as innocent and childlike as on his earliest albums released by Caipirinha, nor is it quite as dark and sinister as his Planet Mu and Sublight releases during the 2000s. The album is a pretty well-rounded mixture of warm, inviting melodies and subtle humor (such as the title "Ring Worm," possibly alluding to the circuit known as the ring modulator) and darker, more alien textures. Most of the tracks have complex, skittery beats that are often doused with delay, but not quite as overloaded with scorching distortion as his earlier work. On the stunning, confounding "Omni 2," Fraioli gradually builds up sparse, touching melodies and sharp, intricate micro-beats, which progressively get weirder and more fragmented while the melodies stay calm and reserved. "Final Meta" is fast and buzzy, starting out playful before developing a more forlorn melody recalling some of the more sad, devastating moments on µ-Ziq's 1997 masterpiece, Lunatic Harness. The ultra-abrasive "Waveguiding" sounds like Confield-era Autechre with a melody written by a cinematic post-rock band like Explosions in the Sky, while the relatively calmer "Margin of Error" is closer to something Rephlex might've released. The album's 16 songs are mostly on the shorter side and many of them fade in, but they feel like considered compositions rather than just demos for expensive synthesizers. As with analog works by Venetian Snares and Somatic Responses, System finds Datach'i pushing the limits of what can be achieved with modular synthesizers. More than anything, it's a true pleasure to have one of the masters of the genre back in the game. © Paul Simpson /TiVo
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Dance - Released February 19, 2016 | Timesig

For an artist whose recordings typically consist of intensely edited, sample-heavy sonic constructions, the "traditional" way to go about making music is to spend countless hours programming an overwhelming modular synthesizer system that takes up an entire room. Aaron Funk has explored analog synthesizer music before, but he usually saves this type of work for his Last Step moniker, which veers toward acid techno rather than the frenetic breakcore of his more well-known guise, Venetian Snares. On Traditional Synthesizer Music, he steps away from the crushing breakbeats, shocking samples, and monstrous vocals of his previous VSnares releases, but his penchant for complex time signatures remains as strong as ever. He pushes his machines to their furthest limits, twisting the rhythms into time signatures that most musicians simply wouldn't dream of, accelerating the tempo to a heart-quickening pace on opening cut "Dreamt Person v3," and embellishing the drum patterns with intricate drum fills and stereo separation. Tracks such as "She Married a Chess Computer in the End" feature miles-deep bass drum kicks, making sure that these tracks have a gigantic bounce to them, which isn't normally associated with music crafted on vintage synthesizers such as these. Aside from the beats, Funk pays as much attention as ever to melody, and his ethereal, decay-heavy notes express terror, longing, confusion, sadness, ecstasy, and a wide spectrum of other emotions. If there's any tradition to what Aaron Funk does, it's that he's always creating fascinating, futuristic music, and Traditional Synthesizer Music is no different. The album is a sharp, thrilling experience, and easily one of Funk's most focused works. © Paul Simpson /TiVo
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Electronic - Released March 5, 2012 | Timesig

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Electronic - Released December 6, 2010 | Timesig

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Electronic - Released August 23, 2010 | Timesig