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Classical - Released January 13, 2017 | SWR Classic

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Gramophone Editor's Choice - 4 étoiles Classica
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Choral Music (Choirs) - Released November 6, 2015 | SWR Classic

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4 étoiles Classica - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
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Symphonic Music - Released September 8, 2017 | SWR Classic

Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama - 4 étoiles Classica
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Symphonic Music - Released October 13, 2017 | SWR Classic

Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - Choc de Classica
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Chamber Music - Released October 13, 2017 | SWR Classic

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Choc de Classica
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Classical - Released January 29, 2013 | SWR Classic

Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - 4 étoiles Classica
The two works on this album present diametrically opposed sides of Francis Poulenc's musical personality and career. Les biches (it means "the does," in case you were wondering) is a joyous, somewhat raucous ballet of Poulenc's youth, an answer to Stravinsky's The Rite of Spring that touches on jazz, neoclassicism (specifically neo-Baroque styles), French popular music, and more in a consistently surprising mixture that includes an offstage choir. The Stabat Mater, composed after a friend's death in 1950, came after Poulenc's reconversion to Catholicism, and it is typical of the radiant, melodic, tonally oriented style of his later years. Conductor Stéphane Denève is emerging as a major conductor of French repertory, and he does a superb job here with the diverse styles of these two works. Les biches crackles with slightly illicit erotic energy. The limpid melodies of the Stabat Mater, as is so often the case with Poulenc, conceal parts that require really top-notch choral singing, and the combined efforts of Denève and the coaches of the combined NDR Choir and Vocal Ensemble of the Southwest German Radio get some spectacularly quiet and controlled choral sounds in the Stabat Mater. Sample the "Quam tristis," track 3, for some amazing controlled choral work at very low dynamic levels. The virtuoso quality of this entire effort commends it for sampling in a crowded marketplace of Poulenc recordings, as does the superb engineering from Hänssler, which renders these sterling choral performances in great detail. © TiVo
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Classical - Released October 11, 2019 | SWR Classic

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 5 étoiles de Classica
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Choral Music (Choirs) - Released August 9, 2019 | SWR Classic

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
Armed with over 2,000 years of history, Japan has been able to develop its own musical language, with forms of expression that are linked tightly to theatre and dance. The country's recent westernisation has contributed to the emergence of a new style which takes on board both Japanese roots and outside influences. This album offers a selection of choral works composed after 1950, in a period when many Japanese composers were gradually liberating themselves from outside influences.That was the case with Toshio Hosokawa (born in 1953) who started out writing in the "western avant-garde style", before taking inspiration from the traditional music of his homeland. The Lotus, based on the Buch der Lieder by Heinrich Heine which Schumann set to music, uses a vocal ensemble and light, discreet percussion, Japanese singing bowls and wind chimes.Töru Takemitsu (1930-1996) is thought of as one of Japan's greatest composers, both at home and around the world. While few, his choral works are very evocative and call up childhood memories, and the "sakura" (cherry blossom) of the popular songs that he arranges in his own style. His music possesses a fascinating subtlety.Michio Mamiya (born 1929) turned early in life to the study of folk music, in the manner of Bartók and Kodály. He collects and transcribes the songs of the oral tradition, which he then works into his music. Finally, Jô Kondô (born 1947) takes inspiration from the great Flemish polyphonists like Johannes Ockeghem, setting modern Japanese literary texts to music. His complex music at once reinforces and hides the ambiguities of the poem, with constant changes in rhythm and a polytextuality inherited from western medieval music. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Classical - Released January 13, 2017 | SWR Classic

Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Editor's Choice - 4 étoiles Classica
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Classical - Released October 7, 2014 | SWR Classic

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4 étoiles Classica
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Symphonic Music - Released November 6, 2015 | SWR Classic

Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or / Arte - Choc de Classica
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Chamber Music - Released November 6, 2015 | SWR Classic

Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
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Classical - Released February 14, 2020 | SWR Classic

Booklet Distinctions 5 étoiles de Classica
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Solo Piano - Released February 9, 2018 | SWR Classic

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
More precisely: 10 April 1953 in the great hall of the Holy Orders of the baroque castle of Ludwigsburg. Clara Haskil, who sadly only had five more years left to live, albeit the happiest and most fertile of her life: with Swiss nationality and a booked-out diary, she could finally give herself over to music without worrying about survival or exile. This most prodigious period of recording gave us Mozart, to be sure, but also rarer repertoires, like Ravel or Debussy, as documented in this publication - in which, indeed, she avoids Mozart altogether! The pièce de résistance is surely the 32nd Sonata Op. 111 by Beethoven, which she plays quite differently from how we are used to hearing it: under her fingers, the fire still crackles, but Haskil knows not to make it a perpetual volcano, which would harm the discourse. Who knows whether it was her fragile health that forced her to go easy - but whatever the reason, musically at least, it is a good thing she did. The programme continues with some rather more transparent pieces from Schumann – the Abegg Variations in particular – before sojourning a while on the other bank of the Rhine with two Études by Debussy, which she plays dreamily; Sonatine by Ravel which she dreams , playfully, before closing with a choral from Bach (the Cantor who opened the proceedings), and a delicate adieu from Schumann, "Abschied" from the Waldszenen. The grande dame of the piano passes into tender silence, rather than ending the concert with virtuoso explosions. 10 April 1953 was a fine day! © SM/Qobuz
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Classical - Released September 11, 2020 | SWR Classic

Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or / Arte
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Lieder (German) - Released September 14, 2018 | SWR Classic

Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or
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Solo Piano - Released October 13, 2017 | SWR Classic

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Classical - Released January 1, 2007 | SWR Classic

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
By calling this series Mozart-- Essential Symphonies, Roger Norrington is clearly going to have to make choices about which is and which isn't an essential Mozart symphony. And by grouping the chosen works into carefully selected but always surprising programs, Norrington is likewise determined to make sure nothing can be taken for granted. Thus on this first of six volumes, Norrington has started with Symphony No. 1 in E flat major, ended with Symphony No. 41 in C major, and placed Symphony 25 in G minor in the middle, thereby giving three portraits of Mozart, one as a child, one as a youth, and one as a mature man. Leading the Radio-Sinfonieorchester Stuttgart des SWR, Norrington turns in light, bright, direct, and powerful interpretations of these familiar works. Though a modern instrument orchestra, the Stuttgart players perform with the alert and energetic ensemble of the best period instrument groups, but their modern instruments give them a wider palette and a greater strength. Norrington, a canny period instrument conductor, takes advantage of these qualities and produces performances that are flexible, expressive, and often quite grand. Recorded live at the 2006 Europäisches Musikfest Stuttgart, Hänssler's digital sound has a huge dynamic range and a wonderful amount of instrumental detail, though some occasional audience noise, too. © TiVo
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Classical - Released August 9, 2019 | SWR Classic

Booklet Distinctions Choc de Classica
This thrilling album offers two versions of Gustav Mahler's Sixth Symphony by the eminent specialist of the genre, German orchestral conductor Michael Gielen, who passed away on 8 March 2019. Seeking refuge with his family in Buenos Aires because of his Jewish roots, he worked alongside the great Erich Kleiber who named him co-tutor at the Teatro Colon. It was at around 50 years of age that Michael Gielen came to the attention of a wider audience, setting down recordings (often live recordings) of the Second Viennese School, and of Mahler in particular.The most tragic of Mahler's symphonies came into sharp relief under his implacable, inspired baton. This first recording from 1971, published here for the first time in an "official" version, has been pirated several times, these unofficial versions often containing incorrect information or wrong names of the conductors, like Eduard van Lindenberg or Hartmut Haenchen. This was also the first time that this recording was released on the basis of the original tapes, with a clear and precise sound.Michael Gielen conducted the Sixth for the last time at a concert in Salzburg on 21 August 2013. It's hard to imagine a greater contrast between two versions by the same conductor. Having long been convinced as he aged that his colleagues were conducting Mahler far too fast, he slowed down his tempo from 1966. This final version from 2013 represents perhaps the lower limit of tempo: that, certainly, was the view of the sound engineer Helmut Hanusch, who has produced this interesting document. In the end, even Gielen found his tempos too short in rehearsals, and gradually sped them up during the concert. It is striking to hear these two different conceptions back to back, separated as they are by forty years (almost two generations!). © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Classical - Released October 1, 2013 | SWR Classic

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
Volume 1 of Stéphane Denève's series of the orchestral works of Maurice Ravel offers five of the composer's most popular compositions. Easily the best known is Boléro, a sophisticated study in orchestration built on a hypnotic ostinato that steadily rises to a violent climax. Right behind it in fame is La valse, which has a similarly obsessive waltz rhythm and a trajectory to an explosive conclusion. While these pieces are the most celebrated in Ravel's oeuvre, not least because of their memorable build-ups, the three remaining selections are much subtler in their orchestral effects and musical styles. Le tombeau de Couperin, based on the collection for piano, is an elegant suite displaying opulent impressionistic colors worked into Baroque dance forms. Alborada del Gracioso is the orchestral version of a dazzling and enormously difficult movement from the piano collection Miroirs, and it is a sparkling character piece that plays off the virtuosity of the original. Rapsodie espagnole is a tour de force of exotic colors and melodies based on Spanish folk music, always a source of inspiration for French composers. Denève leads the Stuttgart Radio Symphony Orchestra in these 2012 performances, and the playing is vibrant and atmospheric, winning high marks for the delicate execution and carefully blended timbres that make Ravel's orchestral music marvelously transparent and magical. © TiVo