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Classique - Released February 14, 2020 | SWR Classic

Booklet
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Classique - Released October 18, 2019 | SWR Classic

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Classique - Released October 18, 2019 | SWR Classic

Booklet
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Classique - Released October 18, 2019 | SWR Classic

CD£47.94

Classique - Released September 13, 2019 | SWR Classic

Booklet
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Classique - Released September 13, 2019 | SWR Classic

Booklet
CD£23.97

Classique - Released September 13, 2019 | SWR Classic

Booklet
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Musique chorale (pour chœur) - Released August 9, 2019 | SWR Classic

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
Armed with over 2,000 years of history, Japan has been able to develop its own musical language, with forms of expression that are linked tightly to theatre and dance. The country's recent westernisation has contributed to the emergence of a new style which takes on board both Japanese roots and outside influences. This album offers a selection of choral works composed after 1950, in a period when many Japanese composers were gradually liberating themselves from outside influences.That was the case with Toshio Hosokawa (born in 1953) who started out writing in the "western avant-garde style", before taking inspiration from the traditional music of his homeland. The Lotus, based on the Buch der Lieder by Heinrich Heine which Schumann set to music, uses a vocal ensemble and light, discreet percussion, Japanese singing bowls and wind chimes.Töru Takemitsu (1930-1996) is thought of as one of Japan's greatest composers, both at home and around the world. While few, his choral works are very evocative and call up childhood memories, and the "sakura" (cherry blossom) of the popular songs that he arranges in his own style. His music possesses a fascinating subtlety.Michio Mamiya (born 1929) turned early in life to the study of folk music, in the manner of Bartók and Kodály. He collects and transcribes the songs of the oral tradition, which he then works into his music. Finally, Jô Kondô (born 1947) takes inspiration from the great Flemish polyphonists like Johannes Ockeghem, setting modern Japanese literary texts to music. His complex music at once reinforces and hides the ambiguities of the poem, with constant changes in rhythm and a polytextuality inherited from western medieval music. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Opéra - Released August 9, 2019 | SWR Classic

Booklet
This is the first album of Pietari Inkinen as chief conductor of the Deutsche Radio Philharmonie. Inkinen, as well as Lise Lindstrom and Stefan Vinke who are already known as highly experienced Wagner performers. © SWR Klassik
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Classique - Released August 9, 2019 | SWR Classic

Booklet Distinctions Choc de Classica
This thrilling album offers two versions of Gustav Mahler's Sixth Symphony by the eminent specialist of the genre, German orchestral conductor Michael Gielen, who passed away on 8 March 2019. Seeking refuge with his family in Buenos Aires because of his Jewish roots, he worked alongside the great Erich Kleiber who named him co-tutor at the Teatro Colon. It was at around 50 years of age that Michael Gielen came to the attention of a wider audience, setting down recordings (often live recordings) of the Second Viennese School, and of Mahler in particular.The most tragic of Mahler's symphonies came into sharp relief under his implacable, inspired baton. This first recording from 1971, published here for the first time in an "official" version, has been pirated several times, these unofficial versions often containing incorrect information or wrong names of the conductors, like Eduard van Lindenberg or Hartmut Haenchen. This was also the first time that this recording was released on the basis of the original tapes, with a clear and precise sound.Michael Gielen conducted the Sixth for the last time at a concert in Salzburg on 21 August 2013. It's hard to imagine a greater contrast between two versions by the same conductor. Having long been convinced as he aged that his colleagues were conducting Mahler far too fast, he slowed down his tempo from 1966. This final version from 2013 represents perhaps the lower limit of tempo: that, certainly, was the view of the sound engineer Helmut Hanusch, who has produced this interesting document. In the end, even Gielen found his tempos too short in rehearsals, and gradually sped them up during the concert. It is striking to hear these two different conceptions back to back, separated as they are by forty years (almost two generations!). © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Classique - Released June 14, 2019 | SWR Classic

Booklet Distinctions Choc de Classica
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Classique - Released June 14, 2019 | SWR Classic

Booklet
His life accidentally cut short days before his thirty-sixth birthday, the tenor Fritz Wunderlich is cemented in memory as an incomparable interpreter of Mozart and Schubert. In a dazzling manner, this album shows how incomplete Wunderlich’s reputation is and how, since his early days, he was an extraordinary interpreter of the music of his time. Recorded by the south German radios between 1956 and 1960, the works presented here originate from a group of musicians that were ignored and reviled by the Nazi regime but remained present in the country against all odds. Such is the case of Günter Raphael, the choirmaster and organist at St. Thomas Leipzig, who lost his job in 1934 after being classed “half-Jew” by the authorities. Well-liked in the post-war GDR, he possessed a distinct sense of humor shown in Sonate Palmström in which he musicalized the absurd poems of Christian Morgenstern and combined a variety of elements such as jazz, pop music and cabaret. A pioneer in Germany of baroque music played on period instruments, Fritz Neumeyer composed for his friend Wunderlich a delectable neo-classical suite of Studentenlieder (“Student Songs”) based on humorous texts from the 17th Century that the tenor interprets with his usual enthusiasm.This passionate publication also provides extracts of operas and sung lieders as well as the diverse ensembles of Dietrich von Bausznern, a friend and classmate of Fritz Wunderlich, Everett Helm, Heinrich Feischner, Hans Pfitzner, Hermann Reutter, Alban Bery (Wozzeck) and Carl Orff, to which the editors have added an air of Stavinski’s oratorio Oedopus Rex. These superbly restored recordings offer a dive into a mysterious, post-war German universe while presenting another side of an artist we thought we already knew well. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Musique chorale (pour chœur) - Released June 14, 2019 | SWR Classic

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Classique - Released June 14, 2019 | SWR Classic

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Classique - Released May 10, 2019 | SWR Classic

Booklet
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Classique - Released May 10, 2019 | SWR Classic

Booklet
CD£7.99

Classique - Released May 10, 2019 | SWR Classic