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Country - Released October 15, 2021 | Southeastern Records

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When the state of Georgia flipped from red to blue during the 2020 presidential elections, Jason Isbell (an Alabama native) was moved to show his support by recording an album of his favorite songs by the state's musicians, donating the proceeds to voter-rights and affordable-housing advocacy organizations. It kicks off with R.E.M.'s "Nightswimming," one of the most heart-tugging displays of human emotion and nostalgia ever put to song. Isbell and Co. glorify that, proving themselves true fans. Béla Fleck and Chris Thile join in (on banjo and mandolin respectively) for the string part originally arranged by Led Zeppelin's John Paul Jones, and the cover highlights a Michael Stipe quality to Isbell's voice that, once you hear it, you can't unhear it. James Brown's "It's a Man's Man's Man's World" is reinvented with soul-baring country sensation Brittney Spencer simmering on the lead. She also delivers a classy tribute to Gladys Knight on "Midnight Train to Georgia," with the 400 Unit and John Paul White having a ball doubling as the Pips. Isbell's fiddle-virtuoso bandmate/wife Amanda Shires lends her crystal-clear voice to a muscular, less murky cover of Cat Power's "Cross Bones Style." Sadler Vaden—guitarist for the 400 Unit—steps up for "Honeysuckle Blue" by Drivin N Cryin, a song that highlights the intersection of gospel and Southern rock to chronicle Georgia's beauty (dogwoods, Blue Ridge mountains) and the poverty that runs through the state like a river. Julien Baker and Brandi Carlile team up for the Indigo Girls' "Kid Fears," recreating Amy Ray and Emily Saliers' spooky echo trick on later verses. It looks sketchy on paper: Carlile's powerhouse voice would surely blow down Baker's low-and-tender style—and, to be honest, that happens, especially when Isbell joins in on the guest part originally sung by Stipe. It's a brave move to cover Otis Redding, but Isbell does a knock-out job on "I've Been Loving You Too Long," layering strings in the place of those famous horns. He also pours out his heart and probably damages his throat hollering one of The Black Crowes' best, "Sometimes Salvation." He can't match the chest-beating histrionics of Chris Robinson but, damn, it's still entertaining; and the band, with original Crowes drummer Steve Gorman sitting in, sounds like the real thing, right down to the high-wire guitar solo and those chill-inducing opening starts-and-stops. There's a faithful cover of the Allmans' jazz-meets-jam classic "In Memory of Elizabeth Reed" (complete with Gregg Allman keyboardist Peter Levin) and a subdued take on R.E.M.'s "Driver 8." Adia Victoria's languorous tone pours like honey across "The Truth" by blueswoman Precious Bryant. And the band wrings out every drop of resignation from keening liberation anthem "I'm Through" (with its killer line "Forget everything I ever told you/ I'm sure I lied way more than twice/ But understand I am not Emily Post") by the late Vic Chesnutt, the Americana artist who fought through paralysis to play guitar and who always felt like he could not have sprung from anywhere but the particular fantasy-world bubble of Athens, Georgia. © Shelly Ridenour/Qobuz
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Country - Released October 1, 2021 | Southeastern Records

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Country - Released September 14, 2021 | Southeastern Records

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Country - Released June 4, 2021 | Southeastern Records

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Rock - Released May 15, 2020 | Southeastern Records

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Reunions arrives a month after the death of John Prine — a mentor of Jason Isbell, who does his memory proud. You hear inspiration in the smart, heartfelt lyrics, some of the best of Isbell's Americana career. The wistful "Dreamsicle" evokes how divorce colors childhood ("new sneakers on the high school court and you swore you'd be there"), and Isbell has said he's particularly proud of "Running With Our Eyes Closed": "It took forever to get you to trust me/Like I was feeding a bird from my hand." And while Isbell's voice is singular — the way his Alabama accent shapes the vowels of "demo tape" on "Only Children" is pure Southern Comfort — there are touchstones both obvious (the noir, Mark Knopfler-like guitar on the terrific "Overseas") and surprising: a Killers echo on "What've I Done to Help" and "It Gets Easier," about the realities of sobriety. Amanda Shires (Isbell’s wife) again lends fiddle and harmony. With its appealing '80s college rock vibe, "Be Afraid" sounds lifted from her great album To The Sunset; it’s one of the most fun inspired takes on an album full of them. © Shelly Ridenour/Qobuz
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Rock - Released April 24, 2020 | Southeastern Records

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Rock - Released March 27, 2020 | Southeastern Records

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Rock - Released March 6, 2020 | Southeastern Records

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Rock - Released February 19, 2020 | Southeastern Records

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Country - Released October 19, 2018 | Southeastern Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released October 12, 2018 | Southeastern Records

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Rock - Released October 5, 2018 | Southeastern Records

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Rock - Released September 14, 2018 | Southeastern Records

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Rock - Released September 28, 2018 | Southeastern Records

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Rock - Released September 28, 2018 | Southeastern Records

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Rock - Released June 16, 2017 | Southeastern Records

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Alongside Chris Stapleton and Sturgill Simpson, Jason Isbell is part of that generation of songwriters who are raising the bar for country music today. Theirs is a country music that tends towards Americana, that rattle-bag music genre that mixes country, rock'n'roll, blues and folk. This is what makes the former member of the Drive-By Truckers a worthy heir to the outlaws of the 1970s (Waylon Jennings, Willie Nelson, Tompall Glaser, etc.) but also to people like Bob Dylan (his idol, the lyrics to whose Boots of Spanish Leather are tattooed on his arm) Crosby Stills Nash & Young, Bruce Springsteen or Ryan Adams. With The Nashville Sound, the southerner from Alabama hardly changes his tune in terms of substance, but really gets worked up around the form. With his up tempo numbers, this record is more rock than the two that came before. Like for his cinematic 2015 album Something More Than Free, his group 400 Unit is on hand, only this time Isbell notes it on the liner: surely a signal of their importance, or a way of copying the Boss, whocredits the E-Street Band on some of his albums... Produced by the ubiquitous Dave Coob,  The Nashville Sound brings together some of the artist's best songs. Through his histories of small people (Cumberland Gap), of fixes, fights and the life of outsiders, and even politics (Hope the High Road), Jason Isbell shows that he is on top of his game. And this time, even more so. Much more… © MZ/Qobuz
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Pop - Released July 17, 2015 | Southeastern Records

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Folk - Released June 16, 2015 | Southeastern Records

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Folk - Released February 10, 2015 | Southeastern Records

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Blues/Country/Folk - Released June 11, 2013 | Southeastern Records