Albums

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Vocal Music (Secular and Sacred) - To be released November 23, 2018 | Signum Records

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Vocal Music (Secular and Sacred) - To be released November 2, 2018 | Signum Records

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Classical - To be released October 26, 2018 | Signum Records

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Chamber Music - To be released October 26, 2018 | Signum Records

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Classical - To be released October 19, 2018 | Signum Records

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Chamber Music - To be released October 12, 2018 | Signum Records

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Vocal Music (Secular and Sacred) - To be released October 12, 2018 | Signum Records

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Classical - To be released October 5, 2018 | Signum Records

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Classical - To be released September 28, 2018 | Signum Records

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The matter shouldn’t even me mentioned, since it is in no way the guarantee of whatever musical quality, one way or another; let’s say that the London-based Chineke! Orchestra is predominantly composed of musicians whose skin colour is slightly more dark than what is usually seen in symphony orchestras (barring Brasil as a matter of fact, where some orchestras are extraordinarily mixed), as well as some from « minorities », but this is no way some kind of reverse segregation. The conductor Roderick Cox, by the way, is of African-American descent, and also by the way, he is an excellent musician with a beautiful posture when conducting, and a superb musical mind; as for pianist Gerard Aimontche, his origin is more unusual since he is Russian… of African descent! This album begins with a very clear and transparent interpretation of Rachmaninov’s Third Piano Concerto, in which Aimonthc refrains from any superfluous hyper-romantic slush, rather aiming at offering the purest interpretation there is. As for Sibelius’ Second Symphony, it is offered in a reading where Cox draws a superb arc from beginning to end, which is not always so easy in this ample and long-breathed music. It is not for nothing that Cox is already Associate conductor at the Minnesota Orchestra, and his career is now developing worldwide. © SM/Qobuz
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Classical - Released September 21, 2018 | Signum Records

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Opera - Released September 14, 2018 | Signum Records

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Classical - Released September 7, 2018 | Signum Records

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Classical - Released August 31, 2018 | Signum Records

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Classical - Released August 24, 2018 | Signum Records

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Chamber Music - Released July 6, 2018 | Signum Records

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While his twelve fantasias for solo flute and solo piano, all published in the 1730s, have been revised many times and spread all over Europe – so that a number of scores have always been available – Telemann's twelve fantasias for solo viola da gamba, published around the same time, seem to have been lost until 2000: no edition, no copy, no manuscript... Nothing. But then one fine day, the substantial contents of the library of a stately home near Osnabrück were presented to the German National Library, and after years of evaluation, miraculously, it was discovered that amongst the treasures there lay the one and only extant copy of these fantasias for viola da gamba. Twelve "new" works by Telemann, a godsend for viola da gamba players! Ten of them were written in three movements; the first only has two, and the second, by way of balance, perhaps, has four. Telemann runs through different keys fairly haphazardly: after the first four, which move from C to F, the others zigzag around somewhat. The formats of these fantasias are all fairly analogous to one another: the movements last two or three minutes. But it is in writing technique that Telemann is really adventurous. The keys which are "easier" for the instrumentalist, that is, those that contain the most open chords, make use of a lot of polyphony, while pieces in the rarer tonalities develop a deliciously melodic language. Viola da gamba player Richard Boothby, a student of Harnoncourt, made a solid name for himself in the baroque milieu when he founded the Purcell Quartet in 1984, and then the Fretwork ensemble the following year, with whom he has recorded a very well-regarded version of the Goldberg Variations. © SM/Qobuz
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Classical - Released July 6, 2018 | Signum Records

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Classical - Released June 29, 2018 | Signum Records

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Classical - Released June 8, 2018 | Signum Records

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Classical - Released June 8, 2018 | Signum Records

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Classical - Released June 1, 2018 | Signum Records

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Although he wrote a dozen orchestral works and as many pieces of chamber music, the Polish composer Łukaszewski (born 1958) made a huge international name for himself in the domain of choral music. For his fiftieth birthday, the Tenebrae choir and its conductor Nigel Short decided to honour him with a beautiful recording of some of his most outstanding choral works. The sacred is crucial to this repertoire, with the psalm Cantate Domino, the Beatitudes and the Responsoria Tenebræ, but we also find Shakespeare's Sonnets. Naturally, there is an organic link with his great Polish predecessors Lutosławski and Penderecki, but also Górecki even, off to the north-east, the Estonian Pärt - in other words, a whole slice of the serial avant-garde of the 1970s had no impact on Łukaszewski's music. He constantly worked at his own vision of modernism, which didn't reject its roots in older music, up to and including the polyphonic writing of the Renaissance, but with an updated harmonic conception. © SM/Qobuz

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