Albums

£15.49

Classical - To be released February 1, 2019 | Nonesuch

Booklet
£17.99
£15.49

Classical - To be released February 1, 2019 | Nonesuch

Hi-Res Booklet
£22.99

Alternative & Indie - Released November 9, 2018 | Nonesuch

Booklet
£1.99

Classical - Released November 1, 2018 | Nonesuch

£1.99

Alternative & Indie - Released October 25, 2018 | Nonesuch

£1.99

Alternative & Indie - Released September 27, 2018 | Nonesuch

£15.99
£13.99

International Pop - Released September 14, 2018 | Nonesuch

Hi-Res
£13.99

International Pop - Released September 14, 2018 | Nonesuch

£132.49

Classical - Released September 7, 2018 | Nonesuch

£13.99

Pop/Rock - Released August 24, 2018 | Nonesuch

Booklet
The election of Donald Trump had a powerful impact on many artists. They had to act! Regardless of the scale or stature of the project, they had to respond to the new situation. For composer Gabriel Kahane, this reaction was immediate. The day after the election, he packed his bags and set off on a journey with a simple, humanist aim: meeting people. It was a hunt for inspiration over 8980 miles end-to-end, and it gave birth to the album Book of Travelers. It's a thirteen-day journey, told through the people Kahane met, and their stories. This "diary" album of eleven songs offers a worm's eye view of America. Rolling out profiles and stories, we go beyond songs, venturing into a sort of theatrical album, where the only character on stage is a huckster. Classical piano compositions, Gabriel's smooth, angelic voice offers a personal meditation, an opening onto the world and onto others. For his first album on Nonesuch, the Californian, who is sometimes compared to Rufus Wainwright or Sufjan Stevens, goes long on sincerity, calm tragedies and unadorned moments of happiness. He takes in a few personal stories as well, like his grandmother's flight from Germany to the USA, on October 1, 1939. On this piano, buttressed against the weight of these stories, the intimacy of these lives are given proper respect by Kahane and his careful playing. © Anna Coluthe/Qobuz
£15.99
£13.99

Pop/Rock - Released August 24, 2018 | Nonesuch

Hi-Res Booklet
The election of Donald Trump had a powerful impact on many artists. They had to act! Regardless of the scale or stature of the project, they had to respond to the new situation. For composer Gabriel Kahane, this reaction was immediate. The day after the election, he packed his bags and set off on a journey with a simple, humanist aim: meeting people. It was a hunt for inspiration over 8980 miles end-to-end, and it gave birth to the album Book of Travelers. It's a thirteen-day journey, told through the people Kahane met, and their stories. This "diary" album of eleven songs offers a worm's eye view of America. Rolling out profiles and stories, we go beyond songs, venturing into a sort of theatrical album, where the only character on stage is a huckster. Classical piano compositions, Gabriel's smooth, angelic voice offers a personal meditation, an opening onto the world and onto others. For his first album on Nonesuch, the Californian, who is sometimes compared to Rufus Wainwright or Sufjan Stevens, goes long on sincerity, calm tragedies and unadorned moments of happiness. He takes in a few personal stories as well, like his grandmother's flight from Germany to the USA, on October 1, 1939. On this piano, buttressed against the weight of these stories, the intimacy of these lives are given proper respect by Kahane and his careful playing. © Anna Coluthe/Qobuz
£1.99

Pop - Released August 17, 2018 | Nonesuch

£2.99
£2.49

Pop - Released August 17, 2018 | Nonesuch

Hi-Res
£2.49

Pop - Released August 17, 2018 | Nonesuch

£1.99

Pop - Released July 27, 2018 | Nonesuch

£13.99

International Pop - Released January 15, 2008 | Nonesuch

Booklet
£13.99
£11.99

Blues/Country/Folk - Released July 20, 2018 | Nonesuch

Hi-Res Booklet
Here’s a delicious sound stew in which the Punch Brothers have put the best Americana sounds. For this fifth album, Chris Thile, mandolin player and singer, offers with his four accomplices an ensemble of ballads full of sweetness and suitable for meditation. In total, All Ashore contains nine tracks and becomes the first self-produced album of the band. Recorded in Los Angeles and released by the Nonesuch label, All Ashore is, according to Thile, like a work of “meditation on committed relationships in the present day”. The Punch Brothers update here the typical instruments of Americana. Banjo (Noam Pikelny), fiddle (Gabe Witcher), mandolin (Chris Thile) and guitar (Chris Eldridge), supported by double bass (Paul Kowert) and vocals. In respect with traditional music, they lead into modernity, both in a music and lyric sense. The note is as important as the lyric, if not more… The Punch Brothers don’t indulge in excessive chatter. Each expresses himself through his instrument, as evidenced by Three Dots and a Dash or It's All Part of the Plan. Through instrumental superimposition, the riffs go one after another, as well as the permanent swinging between nuances and rhythms. While their precedent album, The Phosphorescent Blues, was wandering on the Bluegrass path, notably with titles like Boll Weevil or Forgotten, you will find no recycling here! The pop filled with folk is well and truly there, but Jungle Bird nonetheless evokes a rather quirky blues. It’s a perfect transition between these two albums… And let’s not forget Thile’s melodious voice. In perfect harmony with the playing of his comrades, he displays a great vocal mastery. Whether holding a high note or tackling a lighter and jolting singing, he is always filled with intensity. In the end, All Ashore is a small gold mine, whose richness is accessible to both amateurs and long-time fans. © Clara Bismuth/Qobuz
£11.99

Blues/Country/Folk - Released July 20, 2018 | Nonesuch

Booklet
Here’s a delicious sound stew in which the Punch Brothers have put the best Americana sounds. For this fifth album, Chris Thile, mandolin player and singer, offers with his four accomplices an ensemble of ballads full of sweetness and suitable for meditation. In total, All Ashore contains nine tracks and becomes the first self-produced album of the band. Recorded in Los Angeles and released by the Nonesuch label, All Ashore is, according to Thile, like a work of “meditation on committed relationships in the present day”. The Punch Brothers update here the typical instruments of Americana. Banjo (Noam Pikelny), fiddle (Gabe Witcher), mandolin (Chris Thile) and guitar (Chris Eldridge), supported by double bass (Paul Kowert) and vocals. In respect with traditional music, they lead into modernity, both in a music and lyric sense. The note is as important as the lyric, if not more… The Punch Brothers don’t indulge in excessive chatter. Each expresses himself through his instrument, as evidenced by Three Dots and a Dash or It's All Part of the Plan. Through instrumental superimposition, the riffs go one after another, as well as the permanent swinging between nuances and rhythms. While their precedent album, i>The Phosphorescent Blues, was wandering on the Bluegrass path, notably with titles like Boll Weevil or Forgotten, you will find no recycling here! The pop filled with folk is well and truly there, but Jungle Bird nonetheless evokes a rather quirky blues. It’s a perfect transition between these two albums… And let’s not forget Thile’s melodious voice. In perfect harmony with the playing of his comrades, he displays a great vocal mastery. Whether holding a high note or tackling a lighter and jolting singing, he is always filled with intensity. In the end, All Ashore is a small gold mine, whose richness is accessible to both amateurs and long-time fans. © Clara Bismuth/Qobuz
£1.99

Pop - Released July 13, 2018 | Nonesuch