Albums

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Opera - Released November 16, 2018 | Glossa

Booklet
A vivid demonstration of how widely Fabio Biondi’s musical imagination runs comes with his new recording of Giuseppe Verdi’s work of genius, Macbeth. It is the original Florentine 1847 version of the work, shorn of the Paris revisions more typically found on record, which Fabio Biondi has opted to conduct, the director believing in its greater dramatic and stylistic coherence. Verdi was of the opinion that the Shakespearean tragedy was “one of the greatest creations of the human spirit” and set himself the task of rendering the fire of its drama into music during and following a period when his physical health had broken down. With its scenes of murder, battle and sleep-walking, brindisi and witches’ choruses all creating a sombre atmosphere drenched with paranoia and a lust for power, the dramatic flow of the opera places vast demands on the soloists, notably upon the unhappy title-role couple. Fabio Biondi’s version comes with baritone Giovanni Meoni, a leading Verdi specialist as Macbeth whilst the larger-than-life role of Lady Macbeth is taken by a noted present-day Salome, Médée (and Medea), the soprano Nadja Michael. Bass Fabrizio Beggi assumes the part of Banquo, both when alive and as a ghost. Important also in the work (and as described by Stefano Russomanno in his accompanying essay) is the chorus, a leading protagonist for the composer, and here the Podlasie Opera and Philharmonic Choir. Critical also is Verdi’s orchestral writing for Macbeth, introducing rare and radical tonal colourings and Fabio Biondi, directing his Europa Galante from the violin, is just the radical, challenging musical spirit to breathe new life into Verdi’s masterpiece and its search for dramatic truth. © Glossa
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Classical - Released October 19, 2018 | Glossa

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The modern-day appreciation of Francesco Bartolomeo Conti takes a decisive turn in the direction of his church music with this early eighteenth-century composer’s Missa Sancti Pauli given an ideal recording on Glossa by György Vashegyi, the Purcell Choir and Orfeo Orchestra. Conti was a Florentine who worked for much of his career in the Imperial Court in Vienna, generating much attention there – the ever-observant Johann Sebastian Bach and Zelenka were both known to have been attracted by his music. Curiously, it was liturgical works like this 1715 Missa Sancti Pauli which kept Conti’s name known until near to the end of the nineteenth century rather than the operas, oratorios and cantatas with which he delighted the Viennese Court and which have hitherto been receiving the attention of artists and record labels today. If Conti’s church music is less fledgling Classical than his dramatic fare, there is much in the way of melodic tunefulness and concertato style – for both voices and instruments – to combine with fugalimitative writing reminiscent of the “stile antico”. The work is a “Credo Mass” (both Mozart and Beethoven were to write examples of this genre, with its rondolike restatement of the word in the Credo section. The tone, control, presence and unity of the Purcell Choir have been amply demonstrated already on Glossa in music of the French Baroque – Rameau and Mondonville in particular – and the singers are given full opportunity to shine in Conti’s mass – as are the orchestra, comprised mainly of strings, and the vocal soloists, who include Adriána Kalafszky, Péter Bárány, Zoltán Megyesi and Thomas Dolié. Bárány and Megyesi are also soloists in two additional works: the motet, Fastos caeli audite and the aria Pie Jesu, ad te refugio. © Glossa
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Opera - Released October 19, 2018 | Glossa

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In Baroque opera the dramatic figure of Gaius Julius Caesar received a considerable amount of attention from librettists and composers alike, and not just from G.F. Handel working with Nicola Francesco Haym. With “Giulio Cesare, a Baroque hero”, Raffaele Pe creates a full recital devoted to the Ancient Roman warrior and Dictator of the Republic, drawn from operas spanning the length of the eighteenth century. With refined musicality and artistry the countertenor Pe (who has appeared on a number of recent recordings on Glossa, including the “A due alti” recital with La Venexiana) approaches roles demonstrating contrasting personality traits of the Caesar who was capable not only of heroic acts but also of compassion, of amorous exhilaration, of physical and emotional fragility. The sweep of the eighteenth century encompassed by these compositions also embraced the onstage heyday of the castratos: including Felice Salimbeni, Senesino, Cusanino, Sciroletto and Gasparo Pacchiarotti – demanding from Raffaele Pe great agility in covering both contralto and soprano castrato tessituras. Alongside excerpts from Handel’s Giulio Cesare in Egitto there are arias from works which Pe has been working on to provide modern performing scores together with scholar Valentina Anzani (who provides a historic survey of Caesar in Baroque opera in the accompanying essay), such as by Carlo Francesco Pollarolo, Niccolò Piccinni, Geminano Giacomelli and Francesco Bianchi. Pe is accompanied here by La Lira di Orfeo directed by Luca Giardini (a long-year member of Fabio Biondi’s Europa Galante) in this their debut recording. © Glossa
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Classical - Released October 19, 2018 | Glossa

Hi-Res Booklet
One of the great composing figures from the French Baroque, Michel-Richard de Lalande is starting to receive his just dues through modern recordings, and Glossa is happy to unveil a new release featuring Olivier Schneebeli directing Les Pages et Les Chantres du Centre de Musique Baroque de Versailles in three of Lalande’s sumptuous “grands motets”. Very much a favoured composer during the reign of Louis XIV, Lalande progressively assumed – from the 1680s onwards – more and more of the principal court offices, and was called upon to provide sacred music for the Chapelle Royale within the Château de Versailles. Although the new (and ‘definitive’) chapel was not consecrated until 1710, the trio of “grands motets” (extended multi-movement choral and solo settings, typically of Psalms, with instrumental accompaniment) recorded here will have been conceived of according to the chapel’s architectural and acoustical characteristics. Thomas Leconte, from the CMBV, provides an illuminating historical backdrop in his booklet essay. Much detailed performing information from Lalande’s time is known today – including number of instrumental forces used and about the composer’s later revisions of his scores – and Venite, exultemus Domino, De profundis and Dominus regnavit all receive expressive and meticulously-prepared performances within the Chapelle Royale itself. To the quality of preparation of the CMBV “maîtrise” can be added the presence of a quartet of vocal soloists deeply experienced in the style of music from this time: Chantal Santon-Jeffery, Reinoud Van Mechelen, François Joron and Lisandro Abadie. Likewise, the contribution of Jana Semerádová’s Collegium Marianum provides exemplary instrumental support to Schneebeli’s direction in this new CMBV production. © Glossa
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Chamber Music - Released September 14, 2018 | Glossa

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The violin sonatas of Johannes Brahms were the product of much self-critical reflection, and the three surviving works are from a composer mature in years. Composed around the same time as the Violin Concerto (No. 1), the Piano Trio in C Minor and the Cello Sonata No. 2 (Nos. 2 and 3), they also echo some of his songs, such as those written to poems by Klaus Groth. Into this Romantic atmosphere come new performances of the three works on Glossa, played by violinist Leila Schayegh (particularly awarded for her recordings of Bach, Caldara and Benda), teaming up here with pianist Jan Schultsz. Schayegh plays a copy of a period violin, whilst Schultsz uses an original 1879 Streicher instrument. The two players aim to recapture the performing tradition as the composer would have known it, and within which he would have intended his pieces to have been played. Schayegh and Schultsz worked with Clive Brown and Neal Peres Da Costa in their efforts to aim for “the spirit rather than the dead letter of the score” and they pay admirable notice of important interpretative questions for music of this time – and they provide an intuitive musical and emotional response to the lyricism of the first two sonatas and the darker-hued tones of the third, investing these late-nineteenth-century works. © Glossa
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Classical - Released September 14, 2018 | Glossa

Hi-Res Booklet
With « The Liberation of the Gothic », Björn Schmelzer and Graindelavoix deliver an imaginative reading of music by two English composers active at the end of the fifteenth century, the towering figure of John Browne and the slightly later and much less wellknown Thomas Ashwell (or Ashewell). Björn Schmelzer draws a vivid connection between the florid polyphony of these two composers and the freedom of structure and ornament found in late Gothic architecture, notably that of the fourteenthcentury Lady Chapel built as part of the “Ship of the Fens”, Ely Cathedral. Performing Ashwell’s intricately-woven Missa Ave Maria – a landmark in polyphony – Schmelzer and his Antwerp-based ensemble echo, in the individual freedom accorded to these virtuoso singers, the rich ornamentation of foliage, seemingly in constant motion, decorating the walls of Ely’s Lady Chapel. The singers add their own “coloratura”, an approach which continues to be central to Björn Schmelzer’s interpretation of medieval and Renaissance works, as have been appearing on Glossa for a decade and a half now. In his booklet essay Schmelzer refers to the British writer and artist John Ruskin describing the “liberation of the Gothic” as also concerning “the workers, who were not submitted to repetitive, mechanical work but invested in continuous and infinite variation.” Acting as surrounding pillars to Ashwell’s Mass on this recording are two of the extended motets, much favoured by early Tudor English polyphonists – and encountered in the famous Eton Choirbook manuscript: John Browne’s Stabat mater and his first setting of the Salve regina. © Glossa
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Chamber Music - Released July 20, 2018 | Glossa

Booklet
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Chamber Music - Released June 22, 2018 | Glossa

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Editor's Choice
If, usually, we associate Paganini to his twenty-four Caprices and the devilish virtuosity they demand of the violinist, you will see him here in a completely new light: the works for violin and guitar, much closer to Haydn and Mozart than to the devil’s hand that guided them for the Caprices. Written at the very beginning of the 19th century for some, and in the 1830s for the ones of the collections known as Centone di sonate, these works give prominence both to the violin and the guitar—we will remind you here that Paganini was also a phenomenal guitarist. As for the term “Centone”, it evokes a collection of pieces composed of elements reused from one or many other works; some kind of patchwork, in a way, and indeed the composer integrated there a bit of everything that was in fashion at the time, from the waltz to the polonaise, the pastoral to the march—we don’t necessarily know from whom or from where he took it, or if he just used the term to characterize the medley aspect of the thing. Fabio Biondi on violin and Giangiacomo Pinardi on Romantic guitar (an instrument from 1825) have a field day, and prove us that Paganini could be something other than a simple dispenser of virtuosity. © SM/Qobuz
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Chamber Music - Released June 22, 2018 | Glossa

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
François Francœur perfected his talents as a violinist and composer in the France of the 18th century, down the years of a very full and long life (1698-1787). He was admitted to the Académie Royale de Musique as a violinist at the age of just 15. After several years of playing concerts in the great towns of Europe, he rejoined the The King's 24 Violins in 1730, before becoming a member of the Concert Spirituel, a rare and much-coveted honour. He was also Master of Music at the Opéra de Paris and then musical director of the same institution with his good friend François Rebel. Francœur found himself increasingly in favour at the court of Louis XV who would name him His Majesty's Master of Music in 1760 and ennobled him into the bargain. This was the era of the great rivalry between French and Italian music: Francœur didn't take one side, but accepted the influence of both into his instrumental music. The ten first violin sonatas on this record make up the whole of his First Book published in 1720: ten sonatas, an unusual number at a time when they were normally published by the dozen or half dozen. The writing fuses courtly elegance and rather earthier, joyful Italian energy, and Francœur gives the work a unique voice of its own. In this fresh, melodious music, both refined and robust, we hear tender songs, feverish dances, pastorales, but also a stunning virtuosity. Violinist Mitzi Meyerson chose not to perform these sonatas in the order of their publication, on the grounds that they weren't written to be performed back to back. Meyerson instead arranges them by key as harmoniously possible, and also sorts them by major musical influence: French, Italian and German too. She plays each line with a gentle inflection of the rhythms and emphases that reflects the known historical style of each national body of music. © SM/Qobuz
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Classical - Released June 22, 2018 | Glossa

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
Imprisoned at the start of the 520s, Boethius (real name Anicius Manlius Severinus Boethius, born around 477) couldn't have imagined that his final work would become one of the most-read books of the Middle Ages. Born into a noble Roman family in the days of the abdication of the last Western Emperor, Boethius undertook a fine career as a statesman, as a translator of Greek works into Latin, and as a poet. But the West was govern by an Ostrogothic King, Theoderic the Great, and Boethius's loyalty to the Senate of Rome made him suspect: accused of treason, he was imprisoned and then condemned to death in 524. In his Consolation of Philosophy, written in prison, he describes his battle with himself, to accept his fate, concentrating on the great questions of good and evil. And we know that in the Middle Ages these texts were sung, as we have found musical notation in around thirty manuscripts dating from the 9th to early 12th centuries. The neumes used in this notation describe the overall contour of the melodies, a kind of aide-mémoire for singers who would know the precise notes already. As this oral tradition has since been lost, it long seemed impossible to reconstitute these melodies, but recent research has made it possible to identify the models of song hidden behind this notation: medieval musicians associated certain metric schemes used in the Consolation with particular styles of song. The singers and instrumentalists of Sequentia, veteran performers of songs from this period, have put these discoveries to good use, bringing us a collection of two dozen 11th-century songs; several of Boethius's poems are set to this notation, and in particular the most dramatic part of the text, where Boethius laments his fall. Some fifteen centuries separate us from these singular sounds which seem at once to surge from the depths of the ages, and at the same time to be so close to us, thanks to the clarity of their writing. © SM/Qobuz
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Opera - Released May 18, 2018 | Glossa

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
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Chamber Music - Released May 4, 2018 | Glossa

Hi-Res Booklet
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Classical - Released May 4, 2018 | Glossa

Booklet
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Classical - Released April 20, 2018 | Glossa

Hi-Res Booklet
Of Bach's two known religious cantatas and 15 known profane cantatas, only two make use of bass in the vocal section: the famous 1727 BWV 82 Ich habe genug, which has been recycled for various different vocal soloists over the years, and Ich will den Kreuzstab gerne tragen BWV 56 from 1726. In order to avoid putting out just another recording of these cantatas with the same programme as the dozens which have been recorded over nearly sixty years (by such artists as Hans Hotter, Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau, Gérard Souzay, Gerhard Hüsch, Hermann Prey, John Shirley-Quirk, Bernard Kruysen, Philippe Huttenlocher, Max von Egmond, Siegfried Lorenz, Siegmund Nimsgern, Matthias Goerne, Thomas Quasthoff…), even though this new version is sung by Christian Senn, a little originality is needed. And that's what we have here. In addition to the two hits mentioned above, we have the rare cantata BWV 158 Der Friede sei mit dir – we don't know the exact date it was written, possibly Weimar around 1715, or perhaps only around 1730 in Leipzig. This piece is surely a re-working of an older, lost cantata. Some sources give it as the "cantata for bass and soprano" but in reality this is a serious error of observation: for sure, the aria which makes up the second movement is clearly marked Aria & Chorale, the chorale being restricted to the soprano register, but in reality it was to be sung by "one or several sopranos in the choir", and certainly not for a solo voice. So it's a cantata (unfinished or incomplete) for solo bass, and so this record is a kind of complete collection of Bach's three cantatas for this vocal line-up. © SM/Qobuz
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Opera - Released April 6, 2018 | Glossa

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
Created in 1749 to commemorate the Treaty of Aix-la-Chapelle signed between George II and Louis XV of France to end the War of the Austrian Succession, Rameau’s pastorale héroïque Naïs consecrates the triumph of virtuosity on the stage of the Académie Royale de Musique, while in England, Handel wrote his famous Music for the Royal Fireworks for the same occasion. Weary of sombre tragedies and their dark and oppressive passions, audiences received lighter works more enthusiastically – ballets and pastorales – for which soprano Marie Fel and tenor Pierre Jélyotte were applauded for their prodigious vocal performances. With Naïs, Rameau produces some of his most impressive pages, among which the overture and descriptive prologue, tracing the epic fight between the Titans and the heavenly court for the rule of Olympus. Chivalrous exchanges, athlete evolutions, prophecies, pastoral celebrations, naval battles and underwater nuptials punctuate the work and support the blooming of tender feelings that unite Naïs and Neptune. This co-production between the Centre de Musique Baroque de Versailles (CMBV − Centre of Baroque Music Versailles) and the Müpa Budapest Early Music Festival confirms the position of György Vashegyi in the field of baroque music, and French music in particular. Following the success of Rameau’s Les Fêtes de Polymnie (The Festivals of Polyhymnia) in 2015, and the revelation that was Mondonville’s Isbé, the Hungarian conductor is at it again with excellent singers and his two ensembles, the Budapest Orfeo Orchestra and the Purcell Chorus, which he founded in Budapest at the end of his studies at The Franz Liszt Academy of Music, completed by master classes from the likes of Sir John Eliot Gardiner and Helmut Rilling. This French-Hungarian production focusing on Rameau will be extended with the upcoming release of Les Indes Galantes (The Amorous Indies). © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Classical - Released March 23, 2018 | Glossa

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
If he’s not as famous nowadays as his contemporaries and compatriots Francesco Durante and Leonardo Leo, Francesco Feo still is a major representative of the great Neapolitan school; he incidentally left his position at the Conservatorio di Sant'Onofrio in Naples to Leo to take the one left vacant by Durante at the Conservatorio dei Poveri di Gesù Cristo, still in Naples: it says it all about this superb melting pot that was the kingdom of the Two Sicilies (of which Naples was the capital city) in its heyday. The oratorio San Francesco di Sales, Apostolo del Chablais was performed for the first time in Bologna in January 1734, then again a few years later in Venice, an obvious proof that the work achieved some recognition. By the way, Feo, with the full weight of his sixteen operas—whose first put for the first time into music the libretto of a newcomer, Metastasio—was one of the most highly regarded composers of his time, not only in Naples but also in Vienna and in Madrid, and we can wonder why the hell his music isn’t broadcasted more nowadays. We can bet that this recording, a world premiere (the partition was only very recently recreated), will put him back on the foreground of the Italian baroque scene that he should legitimately share with Leo and Durante. The Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra, conducted by Fabio Biondi, adjoined the skills of a perfect set of singers. © SM/Qobuz
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Classical - Released March 23, 2018 | Glossa

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The indefatigable Antonio Florio, along with his associates from Cappella Neapolitana, has succeeded, with a work by Donato Ricchezza, in unearthing another major rediscovery from the Neapolitan Baroque. The labours of Florio – coupled with the ability to turn dry notes on a dusty manuscript into a sumptuous audio feast – can be no better demonstrated than with this release on Glossa of Los Santos Niños: “Oratorio di San Giusto e San Pastore”, written by a composer who was a pupil of the great Francesco Provenzale. Very little else is known about Donato Ricchezza (c1650-1722), apart from him bequeathing a quantity of scores to the Oratory of the Girolamini in Naples where he worked. The oratorio relates the story of the defence offered by the “holy children” – the brothers Giusto and Pastore, to be martyred in Spain during the Persecution of Diocletian in 303/4 – against the charge of being Christians, as levelled against them first by a soldier and then by the Roman governor Daciano. Marta Fumagalli (contralto), Federica Pagliuca (soprano), Luca Cervoni (tenor) and Giuseppe Naviglio (bass) vividly occupy these four vocal roles.Why Ricchezza chose this story in 1683 Naples is discussed by Dinko Fabris in his enlightening booklet essay. Meagre additional knowledge about Ricchezza says that he wrote eight other oratorios and, as a bonus, an aria from La gara degli elementi is included here, as are a pair of sinfonias by Ricchezza’s contemporary (and fellow pupil of Provenzale), Gaetano Veneziano. © Glossa
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Classical - Released March 23, 2018 | Glossa

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
With a pattern of recording solo albums which has been positively frugal over the last 20 years, Mara Galassi marks her return on Glossa with a new and striking programme, entitled "Portrait of a Lady with Harp". The ambiance into which the noted modernday harpist from Milan plunges the listener is that of the court of Queen Christina of Sweden who, on renouncing her throne, converting to Catholicism and moving to Rome in the mid 1650s embarked upon a spectacular cultural life, becoming a patron for writers, scientists and especially musicians. Among those composers active in Rome at the time were Alessandro Stradella, Bernardo Pasquini, Arcangelo Corelli and Alessandro Scarlatti, all of whom benefitted from Christina’s constant hunger for music of high quality, whether official employees at her court or not. No Mara Galassi record release is going to be found lacking in an element of mystery: is the portrait of a lady with a harp appearing in the booklet that of the self-exiled queen herself? In the accompanying essay, Arnaldo Morelli investigates the history of this painting in search of answers, and describes Christina’s colourful Italian musical life. The hectic, turbulent musical climate of mid-Seicento Rome is grasped and expressed by Mara Galassi, filtering the talents of Christina’s protégés through her chosen instrument which, for this new recording, is based on Girolamo Acciari’s 1632 “Arpa Barberini”, a triple harp of great range and subtlety. © Glossa
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Vocal Music (Secular and Sacred) - Released March 2, 2018 | Glossa

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Gramophone Editor's Choice - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
With "Siface: l’amor castrato", countertenor Filippo Mineccia, together with Javier Ulises Illán and Nereydas, presents a short imaginary pasticcio opera reflecting the music-making and life of the contralto castrato known by that stage name. Born Giovanni Francesco Grossi in 1653 in the Grand Duchy of Tuscany, Siface was acclaimed for his exciting musical performances, yet who became famous also for the tragedy of his love life. He was called upon to sing in operas and oratorios by the likes of Stradella, Pasquini, Bassani, Pallavicino and Agostini. For a long time in the service of Francesco II d’Este in Modena, Siface was an active member of the musical “ducal circuit” in the Italian peninsula, even, on one occasion, additionally being sent to England, where he performed before monarchy, and met and impressed Henry Purcell. Filippo Mineccia brilliantly captures the kaleidoscopic rush of emotions coursing through this selection of arias, which reflects the torrid and spectacular musical pace of life in late seventeenth-century Italy (as well as mirroring Siface’s own downfall on the road from Ferrara to Bologna). The Spanish ensemble Nereydas fully enter into the spirit of this, by turns, colourful, heartfelt, poignant and vivid celebration of vocal and instrumental music, which also features works by Alessandro Scarlatti (the emotive lullaby Dormi o fulmine), Francesco Cavalli and Purcell (My song shall be alway). Elena Bernardi puts flesh on still little understood aspects of the early stages of opera in the late Seicento., © Glossa
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Classical - Released February 16, 2018 | Glossa

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When Porpora (1686-1768) arrived in London for the 1733/34 opera season, his intention was to preside over the launch of a new theatre company aiming to break Handel’s virtual monopoly on the the London “dramma per musica” world. The company, called “Opera of the Nobility”, no less, was created to perform the most contemporary Italian music, with truly exceptional singers such as Farinelli and other stars of that era. The 1735 release of Porpora’s Nuovamente composte opre di musica vocale (i.e. the Cantates Op. 1) fitted into this social and artistic sphere. In these twelve Italian chamber cantatas (six for soprano, six for alto), poet Metastasio borrowed from the Arcadian themes very much in vogue at the time. This collection was bound to become one of Porpora’s greatest success, and seemed deliberately designed as a “catalogue” of the Neapolitan composer’s various expressive, formal and stylistic skills. The edition is luxurious – with no price tag, the sign of a valuable object with limited diffusion – and includes corrections and versions inserted by Porpora during various prints, a precious testimony of the partition’s evolution throughout its diffusion. On the first page, the composer mentioned that the cantatas had been composed to please the “delicate taste” of Frederick, Prince of Wales (who died at a young age in 1751 and never reigned, but whose son George III became King), even if it’s very likely that some of the music had already been composed long before Porpora’s arrival in England – but who could have found out… Actually, someone did: one of his student, Giuseppe Sigismondo: ” [Porpora] left for London with Farinelli to compensate for Handel’s deficiencies in heroic theatre. But clever as a fox, he completed his series of twelve cantatas with continuo and no other instrument, and as soon as he arrived in London, released them in an elegant edition in 1735.” The series of cantatas were instantly successful: they quickly became one of the most beloved vocal works of the 18th century and were widely released through private copies. He became universally admired, so much so that as late as 1820 the Parisian publisher Choron released a new complete edition of the collection: during the 19th century, particularly in German-speaking spheres, the cantatas were included in “Hausmusik” anthologies – with piano accompaniment! It’s worth noticing the strong melodic nature of the bass line, which is most likely the result of Prince Frederick’s appreciation for the cello – an instrument he must have played with royal talent, given the partition’s extreme difficulty. Even voices are used to the extreme: delicate ornamentations, perilous intervals, infinite lines… No doubt, these works are the peak of Italian chamber cantatas, designed for a very small circle of connoisseurs and virtuosos deliberately restricted to the alcove of aristocratic salons. The four singers of the Stile Galante ensemble − Francesca Cassinari and Emanuela Galli, sopranos, Giuseppina Bridelli and Marina De Liso, contraltos – sing all twelve cantatas. © SM/Qobuz

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