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Jazz - Released January 1, 2014 | Emarcy

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Jazz - Released January 1, 2013 | Emarcy

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Flamenco - Released January 1, 2008 | Emarcy

Jazz Club is a budget label that does bare-bones but well-compiled compilations from jazz greats across the spectrum of the music's history. Paco de Lucia is a case in point, though he's not immediately considered to be a jazz musician. Originally a flamenco player, he helped to expand that music, folding in its complex harmonics and fluid sense of phrase and understatement. He expanded jazz by weaving in flamenco's more complex rhythms, organic melodies, and timbral slips. This 18-cut collection details de Lucia's development from the beginning of his second decade as a leader in 1966 to his more experimental and expansive period through the late '90s when he had come full circle and returned to flamenco properly. De Lucia's music was always rooted in flamenco even at its most adventurous; that thread was always audible, and this set proves that in a fascinating way. The music here can be jarring in its brilliance at times, but it is always clearly delineated and its purpose is direct, full of nuance, beauty, and fiery precision, as well as plenty of soul. This is a great budget item for the uninitiated and a nice pick-up for the veteran who is looking for a new way to hear a favorite artist. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 1, 2008 | Emarcy

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Jazz - Released January 1, 2007 | Emarcy

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Jazz - Released January 1, 2002 | Emarcy

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Jazz - Released January 1, 2002 | Emarcy

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Jazz - Released January 1, 1998 | Emarcy

There are two schools of thought regarding this Clifford Brown with strings session (which has been reissued on CD). Brownie plays quite beautifully and shows off his warm tone on such numbers as "Portrait of Jenny," "Memories of You," "Embraceable You" and "Stardust." But on the other hand the string arrangements by Neal Hefti border on muzak and Brown never really departs from the melody. So the trumpeter's tone is the only reason to acquire this disc which to this listener is a slight disappointment, not living up to its potential. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1997 | Emarcy

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Jazz - Released March 28, 1956 | Emarcy

The music on this out-of-print Trip LP has been reissued on CD, most notably in a ten-CD set of Clifford Brown's EmArcy recordings. This particular album features an all-star group with trumpeter Brown, the altos of Herb Geller and Joe Maini, Walter Benton on tenor, pianist Kenny Drew, bassist Curtis Counce and drummer Max Roach. They perform two lengthy numbers, a medium-tempo blues "Coronado" and the ballad "You Go to My Head." "Coronado" is climaxed by an exciting tradeoff by the four horns that gets down to two beats apiece! "You Go to My Head" has fine solos all around but Brownie's closing statement cuts everyone. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
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Vocal Jazz - Released December 18, 1954 | Emarcy

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This 1954 studio date, a self-titled album recorded for Emarcy, was later reissued as Sarah Vaughan with Clifford Brown to denote the involvement of one of the top trumpeters of the day. Vaughan sings nine intimate standards with a band including Brown on trumpet, Herbie Mann on flute, and Paul Quinichette on tenor, each of which have plenty of space for solos (most of the songs are close to the five-minute mark). Vaughan is arguably in the best voice of her career here, pausing and lingering over notes on the standards "April in Paris," "Jim," and "Lullaby of Birdland." As touching as Vaughan is, however, Brown almost equals her with his solos on "Lullaby of Birdland," "Jim," and "September Song," displaying his incredible bop virtuosity in a restrained setting without sacrificing either the simple feeling of his notes or the extraordinary flair of his choices. Quinichette's solos are magnificent as well, his feathery tone nearly a perfect match for Vaughan's voice. Ironically though, neither Brown nor Quinichette or Mann appear on the album's highlight, "Embraceable You," which Vaughan performs with close accompaniment from the rhythm section: Jimmy Jones on piano, Joe Benjamin on bass, and Roy Haynes on drums. Vaughan rounds the notes with a smile and even when she's steeping to reach a few low notes, she never loses the tremendous feeling conveyed by her voice. In whichever incarnation it's reissued, Sarah Vaughan is one of the most important jazz-meets-vocal sessions ever recorded. © John Bush /TiVo
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Vocal Jazz - Released March 19, 1954 | Emarcy

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