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Jazz - To be released June 26, 2020 | ECM

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Jazz - To be released June 26, 2020 | ECM

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Jazz - To be released June 5, 2020 | ECM

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Jazz - To be released June 5, 2020 | ECM

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Jazz - To be released May 29, 2020 | ECM

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Jazz - To be released May 29, 2020 | ECM

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Jazz - To be released May 29, 2020 | ECM

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Jazz - To be released May 29, 2020 | ECM

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Contemporary Jazz - Released May 15, 2020 | ECM

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Contemporary Jazz - Released May 15, 2020 | ECM

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Jazz - Released May 8, 2020 | ECM

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Jazz - Released May 8, 2020 | ECM

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To mark the 75th birthday of Keith Jarrett, his long-time partner has compiled an album of five tracks available exclusively on Qobuz. This close friend of the American pianist happens to be Manfred Eicher, producer and founder of ECM, Keith Jarrett’s label for almost 50 years. On the 10th of November 1971, Jarrett was alone at his piano and Eicher was behind the console cutting the pianist’s first record with ECM: Facing You. “I don’t even know anymore how many records we have made together”, the German producer told Qobuz some years ago. “But looking at this collection retrospectively, it was quite an amazing achievement. The continuity! Everything down to continuity! This is where you can create new things and develop them.” With dynamic group performances and solo improvisations of great depth, this Sequence by Keith Jarrett curated especially for Qobuz by Manfred Eicher, unveils the extraordinary creativity of the great pianist in a variety of musical contexts. Choosing from such an extensive discography couldn’t have been easy and Keith Jarrett 75 offers tracks in solo, duet, trio and quartet… The record opens with Never Let Me Go recorded in January 1983 with bass player Gary Peacock and drummer Jack DeJohnette, an extract from Standards, Vol.2. The song represents the beginnings of a great trio which never ceased to reinvent itself, endlessly referring back to the great pages of jazz history… This intense flurry of improvisation is followed by Creation, Part VII, recorded in the Auditorium Parco della Musica in Rome on the 11th of July 2014, taken from the album Creation; a long string of chords which evoke Jarrett’s ties to the classical repertoire… Next up, a spot of retro on the third title, Personal Mountains, recorded on the 16th of April 1979 in Tokyo with saxophonist Jan Garbarek, bass player Palle Danielsson and drummer Jon Christensen, and taken from the album Sleeper released only in July 2012. The track is packed with lyricism and fury and reminds us of how these Scandinavian sidemen allow the American to develop an original discourse. On No Moon at All recorded in 2007 bass player Charlie Haden and released three years later on the album Jasmine, we are met with a magic and moving reunion after thirty years of separation as they jump at each-other’s throats. The combination of these egos produces an ethereal and sublime interaction…. To finish off this celebration, Manfred Eicher returns to the Jarrett/Peacock/DeJohnette trio with Flying, Part 1, an extract from the album Changes. While it was recorded during the sessions for the albums Standards, Vol.1 and Vol. 2 in January 1983, this recording displays a very Jarrett sense of improvisation and demonstrates his interactions with rhythm sections to which he leaves a large degree of freedom. A magical finale for a musician whose universe seems infinite. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Jazz - Released May 8, 2020 | ECM

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Jazz - Released March 27, 2020 | ECM

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After a beautiful introspective debut for the label ECM, Avishai Cohen changes gears with his band Big Vicious. A unique cast around the Israeli trumpeter boasts two drummers (Aviv Cohen and Ziv Ravitz), an electric bass player (Yonatan Albalak) and a guitarist (Uzi Ramirez). This jazz-wielding quintet grew up with a thousand other sounds in mind. Hence this assembly of plural sound textures from electronic music as well as rock, classical, pop and trip hop. We are treated to big and improbably leaps, such as the one between Massive Attack and Beethoven, the two names whose works Big Vicious revisits (Teardrop and Moonlight Sonata). Avishai Cohen sometimes seems to be wearing the clothes of his elders Jon Hassell and Don Ellis. In particular, he tones down his leader's aura to let the quintet advance as one. It is precisely the homogeneity and atmospheric sound of Big Vicious that makes the whole original. And whether the compositions are trippy (Intent), uptempo (King Kutner) or downright experimental (Fractals), they share a real unique narrative force. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Jazz - Released March 27, 2020 | ECM

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Jazz - Released March 20, 2020 | ECM

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In 2016 and then again in 2018, for his albums Rising Grace and Where the River Goes, Wolfgang Muthspiel surrounded himself with a five-star cast including pianist Brad Mehldau, trumpeter Ambrose Akinmusire and bassist Larry Grenadier. It was enough to show those who still doubted the calibre of the Austrian guitarist that he was still able to draw the greats to his side... for his 2020 offering, this worthy heir to Mick Goodrick and Pat Metheny trims sail to record with double bass player Scott Colley and drummer Brian Blade. As his 2014 Driftwood already showed, this trio is a more powerful sounding board for Muthspiel, who alternates between acoustic and electric guitar. The precision of his phrasing, the melodic perfection of his writing (he signs seven of the nine tunes on the record) and the diversity of styles (be-bop with Ride, experimental on Solo Kanon in 5/4 played with a delay, contemplative on Camino) give birth to a contemporary jazz that is once again demanding formally as well as technically. Angular Blues is also a space of total freedom. And that feeling is even stronger on Everything I Love and I'll Remember April, the two unique standards of the album that the three men imbue from head to toe with a lot of ingenuity. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Jazz - Released March 20, 2020 | ECM

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Jazz - Released February 14, 2020 | ECM

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Choc de Classica
A sage piano stylist audibly influenced by Basie and Monk among others, Carla Bley has over the past 60 years also become one of jazz's preeminent composers. Originally influenced by '60s jazz avant-garde, Bley, as evidenced by her latest, Life Goes On, has fashioned her own jazz ethos—what ECM's Manfred Eicher has called her "radical originality." In jazz groups of any size longevity is often impossible as the essence of the music is often dependent on the potential of new combinations of talent, and yet a large part of Bley's recent success is keyed by her working trio of bassist/life partner Steve Swallow and saxophonist Andy Sheppard, who've been together for 25 years. Based around three suites—her most preferred form of composition—the lean and spacious Life Goes On is wonderfully confident and distinct. The opening movement of the title track is sly blues before turning to two parts that explore her trademark melodic mingling of classical music discipline and free jazz adventure. It concludes with "And Then One Day," where Bley holds down the rhythm with a repeated figure, over which Sheppard plays jaunty lines that have more than a whiff of Paul Desmond's cool tone. "Beautiful Telephones," based upon the current chief executive's comment about the Oval Office's exceptional phones, begins with Bley downshifting emotionally and exploring a more somber mood with Swallow plucking out his notes and Sheppard's tenor saxophone providing an equally unsettling counterpoint. In this work's final movement, the tempos pick up and her characteristic humor comes to the fore as she wryly quotes "The Battle Hymn of the Republic," "The Star-Spangled Banner," "America the Beautiful," and other patriotic hymns in a modern echo of her '70s composition, "Spangled Banner Minor and Other Patriotic Songs." The final suite, "Copycat" explores the hallowed jazz device of call-and-response as a conversation between three supremely accomplished players, whose clairvoyant togetherness shifts between agreeable and discordant. While it's right to applaud the current rush of praise for the fresh energies that youth are bringing to music these days, the deep wisdom and impeccable craft of a pioneer like Bley deserves to be equally acclaimed. © Robert Baird / Qobuz
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Jazz - Released February 14, 2020 | ECM

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama
Having moved to New York like a great many Israeli jazz artists, Oded Tzur quickly established his unique tenor saxophone for a simple reason. His teacher was not a player of the instrument, but was none other than the ultimate master of the bansuri flute Hariprasad Chaurasia. By exploring the subtleties of classical Indian music and ragas, the Tel Aviv native was able to build his knowledge of jazz differently. For his arrival on ECM, Oded Tzur joined forces with pianist Nitai Hershkovits, double bassist Petros Klampanis and drummer Jonathan Blake. Each theme on Here Be Dragons presents itself as a sort of mini raga developing over a moving bass and playing on the juxtaposition of two very different musical concepts. “The dialogue between these dimensions takes us wherever it takes us,” details the saxophonist. “For me, the raga is a universal concept. I hear its connection to synagogue prayers or to the blues -- a marvellous creation -- and to music all around the world.” This is a vision he shares with his three colleagues who are all on the same wavelength as him. The level of restraint, the accuracy of the interventions and the talent of manipulating silence are the most impressive on this record, as Tzur easily avoids the contemplative and self-indulging traps. The depth of his sound even allows him to create a rather captivating narrative. The blissful singing appears to invite you to a journey within. This is a sublime album which finishes with a rather surprising cover of Can’t Help Falling In Love by Elvis. With no gimmicks, Oded Tzur makes the King’s iconic hit his own and thus completes his grandiose entry to Manfred Eicher’s label with a cheeky wink. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Jazz - Released February 14, 2020 | ECM

Booklet
Having moved to New York like a great many Israeli jazz artists, Oded Tzur quickly established his unique tenor saxophone for a simple reason. His teacher was not a player of the instrument, but was none other than the ultimate master of the bansuri flute Hariprasad Chaurasia. By exploring the subtleties of classical Indian music and ragas, the Tel Aviv native was able to build his knowledge of jazz differently. For his arrival on ECM, Oded Tzur joined forces with pianist Nitai Hershkovits, double bassist Petros Klampanis and drummer Jonathan Blake. Each theme on Here Be Dragons presents itself as a sort of mini raga developing over a moving bass and playing on the juxtaposition of two very different musical concepts. “The dialogue between these dimensions takes us wherever it takes us,” details the saxophonist. “For me, the raga is a universal concept. I hear its connection to synagogue prayers or to the blues -- a marvellous creation -- and to music all around the world.” This is a vision he shares with his three colleagues who are all on the same wavelength as him. The level of restraint, the accuracy of the interventions and the talent of manipulating silence are the most impressive on this record, as Tzur easily avoids the contemplative and self-indulging traps. The depth of his sound even allows him to create a rather captivating narrative. The blissful singing appears to invite you to a journey within. This is a sublime album which finishes with a rather surprising cover of Can’t Help Falling In Love by Elvis. With no gimmicks, Oded Tzur makes the King’s iconic hit his own and thus completes his grandiose entry to Manfred Eicher’s label with a cheeky wink. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz

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ECM in the magazine
  • Avishai Cohen: This Time It's Different
    Avishai Cohen: This Time It's Different With his group Big Vicious, the Israeli trumpeter incorporates electronic and atmospheric music into his jazz, and even covers Massive Attack's "Teardrop"!
  • Yonathan Avishai | One Cover One Word
    Yonathan Avishai | One Cover One Word At the time of the release of "Playing the Room" in September 2019, we were lucky enough to talk to both halves of the duo who recorded the album. This time, it's the pianist Yonathan Avishai who g...
  • Avishai Cohen | One Cover One Word
    Avishai Cohen | One Cover One Word We had the opportunity to sit down with the Israeli trumpeter last year at the time of the release of "Playing the Room", the duo album he made with the pianist Yonathan Avishai. This One Cover One...
  • ECM turns 50!
    ECM turns 50! Manfred Eicher’s Munich-born music label celebrates half a century of jazz different from the norms, bringing the traditionally African-American genre to Europe and beyond…
  • Exclusive Qobuz interview with Anouar Brahem
    Exclusive Qobuz interview with Anouar Brahem We sat down with the Tunisian Oud player who released the elegant "Blue Maqams", an album with a jazz core, recorded with Dave Holland, Jack DeJohnette and Django Bates...
  • Roscoe Mitchell, freely...
    Roscoe Mitchell, freely... The great free jazz saxophonist signs a demanding and impressive work ...
  • The Qobuz Studio: Episode #6
    The Qobuz Studio: Episode #6 This week featuring albums from Elton John, General Elektriks, The Cult, Adrian Younge, Michel Benita & Ethics...