Albums

£17.49
£12.49

Classical - Released January 26, 2018 | Decca

Hi-Res
£15.49
£11.49

Country - Released June 8, 2018 | Decca

Hi-Res
£17.99

Full Operas - Released January 1, 1985 | Decca

£78.49

Solo Piano - Released January 1, 2001 | Decca

£55.99

Classical - Released January 1, 1997 | Decca

Distinctions 4 étoiles de Classica
£7.99

Pop - Released January 1, 1997 | Decca

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£13.49

Solo Piano - Released April 6, 2018 | Decca

Hi-Res Distinctions 5 de Diapason
Born in 1975, the Italian pianist Robert Prosseda is without equal when it comes to discovering rare works, like previously unseen pieces by Mendelssohn; or compositions for piano by Salieri, Rossini or Caetani. And here he is with Charles Gounod's works for keyboards, after having exhumed the composer's Concerto pour piano-pédalier et orchestre, which he first performed in concert in 2011. Gounod's music for keyboards makes up about fifty pages, or rather uneven importance. He wasn't very interested in the piano, and many compositions are sketches or short pieces for his own use. For this album, Prosseda has selected the most substantial part of this corpus, with a charming Veneziana to open, followed by the equally famous Marche funèbre pour une marionnette in its excellent original version. The six Romances sans paroles are a welcome discovery, as are the Préludes et fugues which served as preliminary studies for Bach's Clavier bien tempéré and in which Gounod used "a clear writing for two voices, lifted by a chromatism that pushes the artist onward", as Gérard Condé put it in his monumental biography of Gounod (Fayard). The Sonate pour piano à 4 mains (with Enrico Pompili) in a Schubertian style is a pleasant youthful work, probably written in 1839 at the age of 21, during his stay in Rome in the Villa Medici. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Pop - Released January 1, 2002 | Decca

Camel's classic period started with The Snow Goose, an instrumental concept album based on a novella by Paul Gallico. Although there are no lyrics on the album -- two songs feature wordless vocals -- the music follows the emotional arc of the novella's story, which is about a lonely man named Rhayader who helps nurse a wounded snow goose back to health with the help of a young girl called Fritha he recently befriended. Once the goose is healed, it is set free, but Fritha no longer visits the man because the goose is gone. Later, Rhayader is killed in battle during the evacuation of Dunkirk. The goose returned during the battle, and it is then named La Princesse Perdue, symbolizing the hopes that can still survive even during the evils of war. With such a complex fable to tell, it is no surprise that Camel keep their improvisational tendencies reined in, deciding to concentrate on surging, intricate soundscapes that telegraph the emotion of the piece without a single word. And even though The Snow Goose is an instrumental album, it is far more accessible than some of Camel's later work, since it relies on beautiful sonic textures instead of musical experimentation. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Classical - Released January 1, 2008 | Decca

£13.99

Pop/Rock - Released January 1, 1965 | Decca

Her erratic, self-titled debut features lovely baroque arrangements by Mike Leander and decent tunes like "As Tears Go By," and Jackie DeShannon's "Come and Stay With Me" and "In My Time of Sorrow," and Bacharach/David's "If I Never Get to Love You," as well as fairly crummy covers of hits by the Beatles, Herman's Hermits, and Petula Clark. Look for the Japanese CD reissue: It adds six non-LP bonus tracks from mid-'60s singles, including a couple (the girl-groupish "The Sha La La Song," the melancholy "The Morning Sun") that rank among her best '60s recordings. ~ Richie Unterberger
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Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 2009 | Decca

£12.49

Vocal Jazz - Released January 1, 2001 | Decca

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - The Qobuz Standard
An unusual album in the Louis Armstrong canon, this collection of gospel songs, spirituals, homilies, and comic vignettes was the only religious album this determinedly secular musician recorded. Backed by a gospel vocal group led by the celebrated jazz arranger Sy Oliver, Armstrong performs a variety of religious-themed favorites, including "Ezekiel Saw De Wheel," "Going to Shout All Over God's Heaven," and "Didn't it Rain," as well as "Sit Down, You're Rockin' the Boat" from GUYS AND DOLLS. There's an affecting version of the traditional spiritual "Sometimes I Feel Like a Motherless Child," and a particular highlight is the inclusion of two comic sermons by the musician's alter ego, Elder Eatmore.
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Jazz - Released January 1, 2012 | Decca

£17.99

Classical - Released January 1, 2008 | Decca

£19.49

Vocal Jazz - Released January 1, 1991 | Decca

£11.49

Classical - Released January 1, 1998 | Decca

£44.99

Classical - Released January 1, 2014 | Decca

Distinctions 5 de Diapason
£12.49

Pop - Released January 1, 2002 | Decca

Abandoning the lovely soundscapes of Snow Goose, Camel delved into layered guitar and synthesizers similar to those of Pink Floyd's Wish You Were Here on the impressive Moonmadness. Part of the reason behind the shift in musical direction was the label's insistence that Camel venture into more commercial territory after the experimental Snow Goose, and it is true that the music on Moonmadness is more akin to traditional English progressive rock, even though it does occasionally dip into jazz-fusion territory with syncopated rhythms and shimmering keyboards. Furthermore, the songs are a little more concise and accessible than those of its predecessor. That doesn't mean Camel has abandoned art. Moonmadness is indeed a concept album, based loosely on the personalities of each member -- "Chord Change" is Peter Bardens, "Air Born" is Andy Latimer, "Lunar Sea" is Andy Ward and "Another Night" is Doug Ferguson. Certainly, it's a concept that is considerably less defined than that of Snow Goose, and the music isn't quite as challenging, yet that doesn't mean that Moonmadness is devoid of pleasure. In fact, with its long stretches of atmospheric instrumentals and spacy solos, it's quite rewarding. ~ Daevid Jehnzen
£8.99

Jazz - Released January 1, 2012 | Decca

£13.99

Vocal Jazz - Released January 1, 2004 | Decca

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography

The Collections

Label

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