Albums

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Classical - Released September 7, 2018 | Chandos

Hi-Res Booklet
£11.99
£7.99

Classical - Released September 7, 2018 | Chandos

Hi-Res Booklet
£11.99
£7.99

Classical - Released September 7, 2018 | Chandos

Hi-Res Booklet
£11.99
£7.99

Classical - Released September 7, 2018 | Chandos

Hi-Res Booklet
£23.98
£15.98

Chamber Music - Released September 7, 2018 | Chandos

Hi-Res Booklet
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Classical - Released July 6, 2018 | Chandos

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Editor's Choice
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Chamber Music - Released July 6, 2018 | Chandos

Hi-Res Booklet
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Classical - Released July 6, 2018 | Chandos

Hi-Res Booklet
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Classical - Released July 6, 2018 | Chandos

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Editor's Choice
Alright, so perhaps "120 years of the melodies of the Royal College of Music" is a bit of a stretch, given that the first of the composers to study here was Thomas Dunhill in 1893, and the last was Anthony Turnage in 1982, but as he is now a teacher there, we can perhaps let that go. In any case, Sarah Connolly's magnificent selection of English songs from throughout the 20th and early 21st centuries bears witness to the richness of the English melodic stage: Britten of course, Holst, Somervell, Gurney and Tippett are among the more famous, including beyond Britain's shores; but also there are some rather better-kept, but essential, secrets in the form of Morean, Rebecca Clarke, Stanford, Bridge and Parry: all of which make for quite a trip through time. Note that the album contains three discographic world firsts, one of which is fairly obvious – Farewell by Turnage, written especially for Sarah Connolly, for this recordings – and another stupefying, two mélodies by Britten, which the composer had first conceived for his magical 1947 Charm of Lullabies and left to one side, because it was his habit, in his melodic cycles, to do a bit more than required in order to later have the option of pruning some back. These two lullabies remained in the manuscript. They were fairly difficult to decipher, but still clear enough that they have finally been brought out of their Sleeping Beauty suspended animation, sixty years on. We should add that Connolly's rich and sumptuous voice, delicately accompanied by Joseph Middleton, works wonders with this exquisite repertoire. © SM/Qobuz
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Classical - Released June 1, 2018 | Chandos

Hi-Res Booklet
This third album of orchestral works by the great Argentine composer brings together iconic, virtuoso, and colourful works by Alberto Ginastera, which illustrate three very different times of his life and language. Written in 1961, the Piano Concerto n° 1 has as its point of departure a sonata for piano which he had written earlier, and which flirts with atonalism in a language which is broadly inspired by the works of Bartók. The Variaciones Concertantes from 1953 are in a completely different language, tonal and joyful, a kind of concerto for orchestra, and they make an ideal entry point for such a varied and plentiful body of work. Each of the twelve movements uses instruments from orchestra in solo roles, as Bartók, Lutoslawski (an exact contemporary) and Britten had also done. The Concierto Argentino is older still. It is a work from the conservatory, written by a 19-year-old Ginastera, which he often wanted to revise, but never did. All the better, as the work's imperfections and inexperience bear witness to an extravagantly-gifted composer, who had developed, if not quite a language all of his own, then at least a disconcerting confidence for this first, very respectable sally. As on the previous two albums, we find here the case and the verve of Spanish conductor Juanjo Mena and the subtle, imaginative touch of Chinese-American pianist Xiayin Wang. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Classical - Released June 1, 2018 | Chandos

Hi-Res Booklet
This isn't an opera, strictly speaking; this Acis and Galatea by Handel, most likely dating from 1718, is much more a part of the very English genre of the "masque", or pastoral divertimento. That said, its hour-and-a-half running time is redolent of a lot of operas... It seems that Handel wrote it for a rich private patron, in those politically turbulent days when the Royal Theatre had more bad days than good; James Brydge, the count of Carnarvon, had assembled a little troupe of singers and musicians at his manor, as well as a choir, which allowed him to offer purely private musical entertainments of high quality. Of course, the work is sung in English; the orchestration, which is very original, calls for inter alia a soprano recorder for the songbirds; and it unfurls a number of theatrical "tricks" to highlight the personalities of the various characters. Twenty years later, Handel would revise his work for public performances in London, but this is a recording of the 1718 original. Elegance, sensuality, a strong dose of humour in spite of the often-sombre subject matter: this is the best of Handel, and it should be noted that the composer used almost none of his normal "recycling": apart from an aria, all the music here is original, and was not re-used in any other works. Acis and Galatea was one of Handel's most-performed works in his own lifetime, which rather prevented him from re-using any of the tunes too often, as he might have been able to do with a lesser-known piece. The Early Opera Company conducted by Christian Curnyn proves here that private lyrical enterprises, supported by crowdfunding and generous subscriptions from patrons have got a long and happy future ahead of them still. © SM/Qobuz
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Classical - Released June 1, 2018 | Chandos

Hi-Res Booklet
These are some of the most moving works of Vaughan Williams. The 1944 Oboe Concerto, for example, is a veritable treasure of softness and lyricism, as opposed to the ferocious atmosphere of its times, when bombs were falling on London. Flos campi for "solo viola, small chorus and small orchestra" from 1925 is surely one of Vaughan Williams's most sensual pieces, with its six movements that evoke the erotic pleasures of the Song of Songs. Rarer still, Serenade to Music from 1938 was written as a birthday present for Henry Wood, for an arrangement of sixteen vocal soloists, choir and orchestra – which the composer redistributed himself, shortly afterwards, for a more reasonable ensemble of four vocal soloists, choir and orchestra: and that is the version played here. Finally the Piano Concerto of 1926-31, which the dedicatee, pianist Harriet Cohen, thought so difficult that the composer re-wrote it in 1946 for two pianos and orchestra... This is the initial version for piano solo, played by Louis Lortie, but including a tender conclusion that Vaughan Williams added for his two-piano version. © SM/Qobuz
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Classical - Released June 1, 2018 | Chandos

Hi-Res Booklet
Although the 1911 Second Symphony is without a doubt – alongside the slightly later Cello Concerto – the greatest work by the mature Elgar, the Serenade for Strings, finished in 1892 but based on even older material, is clearly the masterpiece of his youth. The Symphony, the last one that the composer finished (a Third was left under construction), is not short of typically English pomp, but the most salient feature of the work is definitely the vast contrast from one movement to the next, or indeed within a given movement, where spontaneous outbursts of feeling mix with regal bursts and doleful chants that speak of a kind of underlying mourning. The Serenade speaks happily of the pleasant English countryside, a kind of song without words: a profoundly British sort of Mendelssohnian inheritance. the BBC Symphony Orchestra swims like a fish in the water of this ineffable, fine music that's bursting with hidden meanings. © SM/Qobuz
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Chamber Music - Released June 1, 2018 | Chandos

Hi-Res Booklet
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Classical - Released May 4, 2018 | Chandos

Hi-Res Booklet
Chandos’ new exclusive collaboration with the recent Salzburg and Leeds competition winner Federico Colli is kicking off with this first volume in a unique Scarlatti series. Playing on a modern Steinway, the Italian pianist – internationally recognised for his intelligent, imaginative interpretations and impeccable technique – here explores the keyboard sonatas of Scarlatti, taking a fresh approach from a philosophical angle, by grouping the compositions into ‘chapters’ in order to reflect the many contrasts of his life and his contradictory personality. In personal booklet notes Colli reveals: ‘I conceived a map of a journey into transcendental thought, beyond the works’ phenomenological meaning. Each chapter has a title and the individual sonatas in each chapter refer back to the permeating image of its basic idea.’ This album is an exceptional start to what promises to be an exciting, long-lasting partnership. © Chandos
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Classical - Released May 4, 2018 | Chandos

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or
Albert Roussel is one of the composers that we are very much supposed to love and worship... but very few orchestras, in France or abroad, regularly play his music, and if, here or there, one hears a fleeting Festin de l’araignée [Spider's Feast] or a bit of Bacchus, or, even more rarely, a symphony, the rest of his output seems relegated to a deeper obscurity. So hats off to this new recording from the musicians of the BBC Philharmonic conducted – luckily for national pride – by a Frenchman (but one whose career was made in England…) Yan-Pascal Tortelier; which brings together three pieces which are very rarely played, i.e. the sumptuous and feisty Suite of 1926 – a work of his later maturity, a contemporary of the explosive Third Symphony – or indeed the no-less sumptuous, colourful Évocations of 1911: a kind of exotic lab test for Padmâvatî which would follow a few years later (?), the Évocations, pure feelgood music, evoke a fabulous India across their three movements. What's more, if you can call a twelve-minute piece a movement, Pour une fête de printemps from 1921 bears witness to how, at one time, Roussel explored the depths of dissonance in a world that was still tonal. © SM/Qobuz
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Classical - Released May 4, 2018 | Chandos

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
Absolute Jest, written in 2011 and revised a little later, is one of John Adams's most irresistible works. The composer borrows liberally from Beethoven, from the quartets but also the Ninth Symphony, to distil a furious, sumptuously-orchestrated score – alongside a solo string quartet, which could render the work a sort of concerto, Adams has added a harp and a piano, both tuned according to the meantone temperament, a way of blending tones and sounds together – which is rich in allusions ("tattoos", in Adams's phrase) to Ludwig van. The final movement, however, makes no bones about its debt to Stravinsky's Symphony in Three Movements. Highly original, Absolute Jest was written for Michael Tilson Thomas and the San Francisco Orchestra (a Qobuzissime of summer 2015), but the evidence is that every new performance uncovers new facets of the work. The same applies to Naïve and Sentimental Music, written for the Los Angeles Philharmonic (and there exists a superb recording of it, by Salonen with Nonesuch); note though that the score is neither naïve nor sentimental, but ferocious and original; the title is surely a borrowing from Schiller (Über naive und sentimentalische Dichtung), which classified Shakespeare and Homer as "naïve" poets. Among some slightly unusual sounds, the listener will note an electric guitar and a piano linked to a sampler… © SM/Qobuz
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Chamber Music - Released May 4, 2018 | Chandos

Hi-Res Booklet
Expert in baroque repertoire and making period discoveries, the Philadelphia-based ensemble Tempesta di Mare extends the commemoration of the 250th anniversary of Telemann’s death (2017) with this unique album played on historically authentic instruments. This recording is the first to bring together Telemann’s three surviving concerti-en-suite, from the intimate Concerto di camera to the more extravagant and impressive Concerto-Suites. Like many seventeenth-century German composers referring to their national idiom as a blend of French, Italian, and German styles, Telemann, who added rustic Polish music to this stylistic soup, quickly became the standard-bearer for this ‘mixed taste’ during the early eighteenth century, writing Italian concertos with a French accent, French overtures featuring moonlighting concerto soloists, and Polish folk tunes that exuberantly dance their way into arias, concertos, sonatas, songs, and suites. One of his more interesting mixtures is the concerto-suite, a subgenre in which a soloist is featured in an opening concerto-allegro and in a following series of French dance movements. The three surviving ones are brought together here for the first time. © Chandos
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Chamber Music - Released April 6, 2018 | Chandos

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Record of the Month - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
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Classical - Released April 6, 2018 | Chandos

Hi-Res Booklet

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