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Classical - Released February 1, 2019 | CAvi-music

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Classical - Released February 1, 2019 | CAvi-music

Booklet
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Classical - Released February 1, 2019 | CAvi-music

Hi-Res Booklet
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Classical - Released January 4, 2019 | CAvi-music

Hi-Res Booklet
Back when Reger was writing his Piano Concerto, 1910, Debussy was working on La Mer and Stravinsky his Firebird. Vienna was becoming the crucible of the new dodecaphonism style. Reger kept his distance from all these tendencies, preferring to explore his own path, which, while sometimes difficult, was always marked by polyphony and counterpoint. His music's architecture was always made up of self-contained cells, like a kind of careful patchwork in which the various elements didn't always seem to relate to each other. Just listen (or re-listen, rather) carefully to the Concerto and you will get a taste of this juxtaposition of modernity with a desire to remain rooted in the past. Markus Becker (who recorded all of Reger's solo piano works over twenty years) rounds off the collection with the Épisodes, written in the same year as the Concerto, but in an almost-miniaturist style – which just goes to show that all of Reger's work isn't marked by gigantism as these pieces all clock in at three or four minutes each. In them, the composer returns to the path of his great inspirations: the later Brahms and Beethoven's final works including the Bagatelles. © SM/Qobuz
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Classical - Released January 4, 2019 | CAvi-music

Hi-Res Booklet
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Classical - Released November 16, 2018 | CAvi-music

Hi-Res Booklet
With Bernstein being considered as a composer of symphonies, musicals, and sacred works, many people forget that he also wrote a considerable amount of chamber music pieces, most of them for piano only. His Anniversaries represent an important part of these collections: miniatures created in homage to his friends and colleagues for each new anniversary. They include Copland, Foss, Mr and Mrs Koussevitzky, Sondheim, his wife and daughter and many other lesser-known characters. And let’s not forget his 1981 Touches for solo piano, a piece which was required for the Van Cliburn International Piano Competition. There’s also a Sonata for Clarinet and Piano, another for violin and piano, a trio with piano, and a few other diversified pieces, most of which date from between the composer’s first maturity to the 1950s. Then there are the surprising Variations for recorder and cello on an “octatonic” scale, one of Messiaen’s favoured modes of limited transposition. Another rarity; the Dance Suite almost constitutes a musical testament as it was created only a few months before the genius composer-conductor passed away. It features jazz and even music-hall influences and was very dear to Mr Bernstein. © SM/Qobuz
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Classical - Released November 9, 2018 | CAvi-music

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Symphonic Music - Released October 12, 2018 | CAvi-music

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Classical - Released October 12, 2018 | CAvi-music

Hi-Res Booklet
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Classical - Released August 31, 2018 | CAvi-music

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Preis der deutschen Schallplattenkritik
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Classical - Released August 17, 2018 | CAvi-music

Hi-Res Booklet
The phrase “Swan Song” would somewhat mean, admittedly, that the composers knew that their time had come, and that they wanted to bid the world adieu and give some retrospective on their life and work. Absolutely not! None of the four composer included here intended to go back ad patres any time soon, starting with Schubert whose Schwanengesang is actually a blend made posthumously by a publisher, who packed under this title some fourteen isolated Lieder, which weren’t meant to form a cycle. Baritone Christian Immler has chosen the six Lieder whose poems are from Heinrich Heine. Brahms himself, in 1896, was only lamenting the passing of Clara Schumann, but did he know that he would only outlive her for a year when he wrote his Four Serious Songs. Above all, his own swan song would be the eleven chorale preludes for organ which evoke imminent death in a poignant way—even if the four songs are greatly emotional. Samuel Barber’s Three Songs, written in 1972 for Fischer-Dieskay, are admittedly among his last works (and his ultimate opus for choir and piano), but the composer still had almost ten years to live. That being said, the crepuscular mood will escape no one’s attention, as well as the extreme focus of the discourse. Finally, on the polar opposite of this feeling, Bernstein’s Arias and Barcarolles, written in 1988—two years before his death, then—are not, absolutely not even, funeral or contemplative! This is some work of explosive vitality, deliciously conceived for baritone, mezzo and four-handed piano. For the end of this album, Immler is joined by the mezzo-soprano Anna Stéphany. © SM/Qobuz
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Classical - Released August 10, 2018 | CAvi-music

Hi-Res Booklet
No, No, Gershwin didn’t write three preludes for saxophone and piano; he has admittedly written several preludes for piano (in the desire of writing twenty-four in the end, like Chopin or Rachmaninoff, but the project was never finished), among which three have been gathered in a collection. And of course, soon many arrangement for various instruments have flourished, like this one for saxophone and piano (whose author isn’t specified); you will note, with the piano partition at hand, that saxophonist Asya Fateyeva takes a lot of musical liberties, which only does justice to the music. However, Poulenc has well and truly written a Sonata for horn, trumpet and trombone in 1923, one example of the most facetious Poulenc, the most “bad boyish”; as well as in 1926, a Trio oboe, bassoon and piano, somewhat borrowing to Stravinsky. Marc Eychenne, a French composer born in 1933 in a then French Algeria, doesn’t hesitate to incorporate elements of folkloric essence—maybe imaginary?—in his Cantilene and dance for violin, saxophone and piano from 1961, deliberately written in a neo-classical way: it’s a rare composer that is worth discovering. Lutoslawski doesn’t need any introduction. His Partita for violin and piano from 1984 closely fits the neo-Baroque format of the rest, but none of the language; this is an incredibly original partition. All those works have been recorded live during the Chamber music festival directed by Lars Vogt that took place in June 2017 in the very singular hydroelectric plant of Heimach in Germany, now a summit of culture even if the turbines are still working. It must be said that the building from 1905 has been built in the purest Jugendstil—the German Art Nouveau—, including the machinery whose beauty is surreal. © SM/Qobuz
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Chamber Music - Released August 10, 2018 | CAvi-music

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Classical - Released July 13, 2018 | CAvi-music

Booklet
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Classical - Released July 13, 2018 | CAvi-music

Hi-Res Booklet
While he emigrated to Palestine from his native Germany in 1934, Josef Tal – born Grünthal (1910-2008) – didn't follow in the footsteps of many Jewish composers in British Mandate Palestine, later Israel, who tried to incorporate popular near-Eastern folk tradition into their language. Tal, an avant-gardist in his day, a student of Hindemith, took on board atonalism, serialism, and early electronic music, all the while holding onto his melodic and tonal conceptions which he owed to Hindemith and Shostakovitch alike. His 1940 Suite for Solo Viola even recalls the accents of Max Reger... The Sonata for Viola and Piano of 1960 marked a clear transition towards a more modernist idiom, while the Duet for Viola and Violin of 1965 was an incursion into the European avant-garde of the day. This is an an avant-garde that clearly receded from view in Perspective, for solo viola, a work of his later maturity written in 1996, at the age of 86. Viola player Hartmut Rohde, a founding member of the Mozart Piano Quartet, and a favoured partner of stars like David Geringas, Janine Jansen and Jörg Widmann, offers up these rare pearls with a clear admiration for the composer, whom he was lucky enough to meet with, the better to understand his music. © SM/Qobuz
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Classical - Released July 13, 2018 | CAvi-music

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Classical - Released May 18, 2018 | CAvi-music

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Classical - Released April 27, 2018 | CAvi-music

Hi-Res Booklet
Almost an exact contemporary of Saint-Saëns, Hans Sommer partly faced the same dilemma as the great Camille: born in 1837, in the heart of the Romantic period, he passed away in 1922 and saw many evolutions, even revolutions, pass him by without taking part. He was part of the circles of Richard Strauss (who even conducted one of his operas in Weimar in 1892) and some of his younger colleagues, but never approached the language – even the least avant-garde – of a Schoenberg for instance, including in his later works. A late romantic, fascinated with modern forms but still attached to tone, harmony and strong architecture, he got into music rather late in life, following a first career as a mathematician, physician and naturalist. He authored ten operas and most importantly an imposing repertoire of Lieder in line with the works of Wagner, Schumann, Liszt and the first Strauss, written for the most part before the 1900s. Baritone Sebastian Noack performs a nice range of Sommer’s creations in this field that he so masterfully explored. © SM/Qobuz
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Symphonic Music - Released March 16, 2018 | CAvi-music

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Editor's Choice
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Classical - Released March 16, 2018 | CAvi-music

Hi-Res Booklet
Harmonies and virtuosity: that is what the two composers Sergei Rachmaninoff and Carlos Guastavino have in common. “Even though the geographical distance between them was immense, their approach to the piano was strikingly similar”, remarks Martin Klett. In both composers the Romantic element is paired with apparent attractive simplicity and ambitious piano artistry. Klett begins his album with a brief piece by the Argentinian composer Guastavino (1912-2000), one of the country’s most outstanding composers. In the course of his travels to Europe, the U.S.S.R., and China, he often presented his own piano works and songs in public – as well as his orchestral works, profoundly imbued with folklore. The listener will discover among others the Sonatina in three movements, where the composer associates folklore elements with the Romantic sonatina form. Klett continues with a selection of Guastavino’s Cantos Populares, Argentinian “Songs Without Words” so to speak. This cycle consists of ten brief aphorisms – often a short tango, a zamba, or a chacarera. The programme’s section dedicated to Guastavino closes with Las Niñas (The Girls, written 1953), where the link towards Rachmaninov seems rather obvious. A perfect transition to introduce Rachmaninoff’s Second Sonata, which was composed in Rome in 1913 and helped consolidate his reputation as Russia’s last great Romantic. Once Rachmaninoff had performed the Second Sonata many times in public, he decided to revise it thoroughly in 1931, and Klett plays this definite version. Klett, a former student of Elisabeth Leonskaja, Leon Fleisher and Pascal Devoyon, won the International Johannes Brahms Competition and the German National Music Competition, and has become a welcome guest at the prestigious music festivals of Lucerne, Schleswig-Holstein, Heidelberg, Mecklenburg-Vorpommern and Schwetzingen to name just a few. © SM/Qobuz