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Humour - Released January 1, 2011 | Capitol Records

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Humour - Released January 1, 2011 | Capitol Records

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Humour - Released January 1, 2011 | Capitol Records

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Humour - Released January 1, 2011 | Capitol Records

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Humour/Spoken Word - Released January 1, 2010 | Capitol Records

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Humour - Released January 1, 2009 | Capitol Records

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Humour - Released January 1, 2009 | Capitol Records

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Humour - Released January 1, 2009 | Capitol Records

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Humour - Released January 1, 2009 | Capitol Records

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Humour - Released January 1, 2008 | Capitol Records

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Humour/Spoken Word - Released January 1, 2006 | Capitol Records

Like one of her biggest selling albums, Yesterday's Love Songs/Tomorrow's Blues, Hollywood My Way is filled with strong material, fine arrangements, and more than enough evidence of Nancy Wilson's considerable and elegant vocal talents. One thing Hollywood My Way doesn't have, though, is a big hit like Yesterday's Love Songs' "Guess Who I Saw Today," and that goes a long way in explaining Capitol's reticence about releasing it. Regardless, this collection of movie songs ranging from 1931's "When Did You Leave Heaven" to 1962's "Days of Wine and Roses" (with Jimmy Jones' stellar arrangements) is one of Wilson's best. As usual, she deftly works through a variety of tempi with aplomb. "My Shining Hours"' breakneck speed and arrangement are kept in check by her behind-the-beat, elongated phrasing, while the ballad tempo in "Days of Wine of Roses" is ignited with an assured and dramatic vocal buildup. Wilson's supple voice seems especially fit for the bossa nova treatment of "Moonriver" -- she easily shifts from a whisper to full-throated dynamics over the lilting yet steady beat. Equally impressive is her urbane blues delivery on "When Did You Leave Heaven." © Stephen Cook /TiVo
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Humour/Spoken Word - Released January 1, 2005 | Capitol Records

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Humour/Spoken Word - Released January 1, 2005 | Capitol Records

Of all the recordings in Capitol's Live from Las Vegas series, this set by Louis Prima and Keely Smith with Sam Butera & the Witnesses is a standout. For Prima fans, it's a treasure trove since only six of the disc's 19 tracks have been previously issued in any form. Recorded in 1958 during the act's long-running stint at the Sahara's Casbah Theater and featuring superb editing that retains much of the stage banter and the pair's often humorous antics, it offers listeners the spontaneity and feel of a single live set in the moment. The sound is simply stellar; warm, full, and immediate, its presence gives one the impression of being in the room. As evidenced here, Prima and Smith often worked out new material in front of their nightly audiences. Mistakes are left in, making this all the more prescient. The track list ranges from the familiar, like "Buona Sera" (Prima), "Robin Hood" (Prima), "Autumn Leaves" (Smith), and "Greenback Dollar Bill" (Butera), to a debut recording of "Nothing Can Replace My Man" (Smith) and killer renditions of "White Cliffs of Dover" (Prima), "Too Marvelous for Words" (Prima), and "Don't Take Your Love from Me" (Smith). These collaborative performances are one of a kind. They underscore that while the studio recordings were of high merit artistically, it is as a live act that the pair established their legendary reputation. In fact, what is presented here lends a lot of weight to the claim that Prima and Smith virtually invented the Vegas lounge act. Live from Las Vegas is a hip and unceasing swingfest from top to bottom, with great humor, inspired singing and musicianship, and hipster vibes. For those who checked out Prima during the lounge revival, this is one for your next bash. For those who have been longtime disciples, this is the Holy Grail. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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Humour/Spoken Word - Released January 1, 2005 | Capitol Records

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Humour/Spoken Word - Released January 1, 2004 | Capitol Records

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Humour/Spoken Word - Released January 1, 2000 | Capitol Records

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Humour/Spoken Word - Released January 1, 1999 | Capitol Records

Classic pop crooner Bobby Darin is profiled in this volume of Capitol's Ultra Lounge series, Wild, Cool & Swingin. The label's vaults reveal Darin performances like "Hello, Young Lovers," "Hello Dolly," "I Left My Heart in San Francisco" and others that reflect his range and versatility as a performer. © Heather Phares /TiVo
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Humour/Spoken Word - Released January 1, 1999 | Capitol Records

Capitol's Ultra Lounge series continues with in-depth profiles of some of the label's swinginest artists. Mrs. Miller: Wild Cool & Swingin features Miller's distinctive renditions of classics like "The Girl from Ipanema," "Yellow Submarine," "Moon River," "Monday Monday," "Bill Bailey (Won't You Please Come Home)" and more. © Heather Phares /TiVo
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Humour/Spoken Word - Released January 1, 1999 | Capitol Records

When Kendall Payne appeared at 1998's Lillith Fair festival and made her recording debut with Jordan's Sister, the artists she was compared to ranged from Jewel to Alanis Morrissette. But the singer/songwriter's amplified, uptempo rockers aren't as angry or as angst-ridden as Morrissette's, and her introspective ballads aren't as light or as gossamer as Jewel's. The bottom line is that Payne, who was 19 when this CD came out, is her own person--and she's also someone who has a lot on her mind. The lyrics, all of which the L.A. native wrote or co-wrote, tend to be serious rather than escapist. The riveting "It's Not The Time" finds a young woman facing an unplanned pregnancy and weighing her options, while "Hollywood" finds a recent Tinseltown arrival coping with life on Hollywood's potentially dangerous streets. On the poignant ballad "Fatherless At 14," Payne portrays a father who has died unexpectedly and, in the afterlife, is missing the teen-age daughter he left behind. This promising debut album makes it clear that Payne is an artist of substance. © Alex Henderson /TiVo
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Humour - Released January 1, 1998 | Capitol Records

Combining Tom Lehrer with Spike Jones (would that make Tom Jones?) and Nichols and May with Joe Friday (a May weekend perhaps?), musical comedian Stan Freberg skewers everyone from Walt Disney to Cole Porter. Mumbling through "Sh-Boom," Freberg drags "The Great Pretender" snarling to "The Heartbreak Hotel," snares "The Yellow Rose of Texas," and takes Harry Belafonte's famous "Banana Boat" sniffling down Lonnie Donnegan's "Rock Island Line." Along the way, he reveals Little Red Riding Hood's true colors, turns Chicken Little over to a shrink, arrests a dragon for overacting (a "dragonet" -- get it?! Duuumb da-dumb dumb!), and puts Ebeneezer Scrooge in the modern-day business world (not a far stretch!). Musical? Maybe. Funny? Definitely! © Matthew Robinson /TiVo

Label

Capitol Records in the magazine
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    Katy Perry - If it ain't broke don't fix it It comes as no great surprise that Smile, Katy Perry’s fifth album, doesn’t buck the trend of her previous work, which has been at the heart of the American pop scene for the last ten years.