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Solo Piano - Released November 23, 2018 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Gramophone Editor's Choice - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik - 5 étoiles de Classica
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Classical - Released January 1, 2013 | Deutsche Grammophon Classics

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Gramophone Editor's Choice - Hi-Res Audio
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Classical - Released January 1, 2011 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Booklet Distinctions Choc de Classica - Exceptional sound
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Classical - Released April 8, 2016 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released September 21, 2018 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released March 1, 2012 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Booklet
While the outer appearance of Yuja Wang's Fantasia might make it appear to be an album of mysterious, delicate, or fanciful piano music, it is actually a high-powered collection of showstoppers that have been favorites of this pianist for many years. Wang's experience shows, too, because these are assured and dynamic performances that demonstrate her thorough knowledge of the music, her great physical prowess, and her impressive technical chops. She obviously enjoys taking on three of Rachmaninov's challenging Études-Tableaux and Horowitz's ferociously difficult Carmen Variations, and she makes the Liszt-Horowitz transcription of Saint-Saëns' Danse macabre an encore to beat all encores. But not everything is programmed for showing off, because Wang plays with considerable restraint and taste in the Scarlatti Sonata in G major, K. 455, and the Mélodie from Gluck's Orfeo ed Euridice, and her most expressive and compelling playing is on display in the selections by Alexander Scriabin, evidently one of her favorite composers. With Deutsche Grammophon's exceptional reproduction, Wang presents the music with a wide dynamic range, which ranges from the soft magical passages of the Schubert-Liszt Gretchen am Spinnrade to the steadily building crescendo of Dukas' L'apprenti sorcier, so this is an impressive demonstration of what she can do at the keyboard.
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Classical - Released January 1, 2009 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released May 14, 2010 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released October 2, 2015 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 2013 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released October 2, 2015 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Booklet
As a concerto soloist, Yuja Wang is best known for playing the Russian blockbusters of Tchaikovsky, Rachmaninov, and Prokofiev, but this all-French album from Deutsche Grammophon reveals her talents in a different light. Maurice Ravel's Piano Concerto in G major and his Piano Concerto for the Left Hand in D major are among the most effervescent in the repertoire, and Wang sparkles with charm and energy, sometimes giving a feeling of being lighter than air when playing with the Tonhalle-Orchester Zürich, under the direction of Lionel Bringuier. Most of the magic may be in Ravel's carefully voiced scoring, which creates space around the piano and makes it completely audible, but Wang deserves credit for her controlled touch, seemingly effortless virtuosity, and elegant phrasing, which are always in evidence, even in the more frenetic passages. Gabriel Fauré's Ballade in F sharp major is a solo piano piece that provides a palate cleanser between the concertos, and here Wang offers an intimate reading that is both rich in sonorities and transparent in all its details.
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Classical - Released January 1, 2010 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released September 21, 2018 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released April 8, 2016 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Booklet
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Classical - Released November 23, 2018 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Booklet
The Chinese pianist Yuja Wang has gone beyond dazzling technique and wardrobe controversies to a point where she can issue an album with a grand title like The Berlin Recital and back it up with entirely compelling playing. Compared with other top pianists, Wang's repertory is rather circumscribed: she keeps returning to the same composers from the mid-19th to the mid-20th centuries, and, save Liszt, most of them are represented here. But within this field, which does not lack for recorded versions, Wang manages to seriously excel. She devotes the first third of the program to Rachmaninov, whose fusion of extreme virtuosity and subtle detail suits her magnificently: one can imagine that the composer himself, whose teaching and presence extended into the memory of today's older pianists, would indeed have loved her. Sample one of the Etudes-Tableaux, where there is just not a detail where Wang is not in complete control. But she is also in control of the long line, both in the difficult unchanging rhythm of the finale of Prokofiev's Piano Sonata No. 8 in B flat major, Op. 84, and in the layout of the whole program, which proceeds from the Romantic world of Rachmaninov into Scriabin and Ligeti, psychological and abstract respectively, and onward to Prokofiev, entirely a product of the modern world. With excellent sound from Deutsche Grammophon that gives a sense of Wang's towering presence, this is indeed a rare and lasting pleasure.
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Classical - Released October 26, 2018 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)