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Classical - Released January 1, 2013 | Deutsche Grammophon Classics

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Gramophone Editor's Choice - Hi-Res Audio
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Classical - Released January 1, 2011 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Booklet Distinctions Choc de Classica - Prise de son d'exception
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Classical - Released November 23, 2018 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Editor's Choice
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Classical - Released April 8, 2016 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released September 21, 2018 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released March 1, 2012 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Booklet
While the outer appearance of Yuja Wang's Fantasia might make it appear to be an album of mysterious, delicate, or fanciful piano music, it is actually a high-powered collection of showstoppers that have been favorites of this pianist for many years. Wang's experience shows, too, because these are assured and dynamic performances that demonstrate her thorough knowledge of the music, her great physical prowess, and her impressive technical chops. She obviously enjoys taking on three of Rachmaninov's challenging Études-Tableaux and Horowitz's ferociously difficult Carmen Variations, and she makes the Liszt-Horowitz transcription of Saint-Saëns' Danse macabre an encore to beat all encores. But not everything is programmed for showing off, because Wang plays with considerable restraint and taste in the Scarlatti Sonata in G major, K. 455, and the Mélodie from Gluck's Orfeo ed Euridice, and her most expressive and compelling playing is on display in the selections by Alexander Scriabin, evidently one of her favorite composers. With Deutsche Grammophon's exceptional reproduction, Wang presents the music with a wide dynamic range, which ranges from the soft magical passages of the Schubert-Liszt Gretchen am Spinnrade to the steadily building crescendo of Dukas' L'apprenti sorcier, so this is an impressive demonstration of what she can do at the keyboard.
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Classical - Released January 1, 2009 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Booklet
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Classical - Released May 14, 2010 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released October 2, 2015 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 2013 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Booklet
The 2013 British film Summer in February, about a love triangle among some artistic types in scenic Cornwall, was not terribly well reviewed. Its soundtrack, too, treads ground that will be very familiar to those who frequently attend lush art-house fare: big, romantic melodies, a few faintly recognizable vocal melodies with the vocals so processed that you wonder whether there's a human behind them at all, and a gauzy sheen covering the whole and blotting out any possible sharp edge. But composer Benjamin Wallfisch, who has written a good deal of this stuff, has come up with a novel twist this time: beginning with Chinese pianist Yuja Wang, he convinced top-level players, including his father, Raphael Wallfisch, to sign on to the performance. Now, the nameless musicians who labor in film-studio orchestras are probably among the more underrated figures in the music ecosystem, but Wang is one of the more exciting young pianists around, and you don't typically hear someone like her in this setting. She's the most prominent of the soloists, and the smoothness of her lines will add emotional impact for those ready to accept the assumptions of this kind of thing. The music was also beautifully recorded. Your reactions here will definitely depend on your general attitude toward the source material, but this is an above-average example. ~ James Manheim
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Classical - Released October 2, 2015 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Booklet
As a concerto soloist, Yuja Wang is best known for playing the Russian blockbusters of Tchaikovsky, Rachmaninov, and Prokofiev, but this all-French album from Deutsche Grammophon reveals her talents in a different light. Maurice Ravel's Piano Concerto in G major and his Piano Concerto for the Left Hand in D major are among the most effervescent in the repertoire, and Wang sparkles with charm and energy, sometimes giving a feeling of being lighter than air when playing with the Tonhalle-Orchester Zürich, under the direction of Lionel Bringuier. Most of the magic may be in Ravel's carefully voiced scoring, which creates space around the piano and makes it completely audible, but Wang deserves credit for her controlled touch, seemingly effortless virtuosity, and elegant phrasing, which are always in evidence, even in the more frenetic passages. Gabriel Fauré's Ballade in F sharp major is a solo piano piece that provides a palate cleanser between the concertos, and here Wang offers an intimate reading that is both rich in sonorities and transparent in all its details.
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Classical - Released April 8, 2016 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Booklet
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Classical - Released September 21, 2018 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released November 23, 2018 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Booklet
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Classical - Released October 26, 2018 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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