Similar artists

Albums

£51.49

Classical - Released January 1, 2013 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Distinctions Diapason d'or - Choc de Classica
£31.96

Solo Piano - Released November 17, 2017 | APR

Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - Gramophone Editor's Choice
This edition of the complete recordings of the Beethoven Sonatas, made during the war, is a godsend for all the lovers of the great German pianist, and there are a lot of them, of all generations. One could get a bit lost in the jungle of his many recordings that came out from 1920 to 1975: that is, over 55 years – which is a lot, to say that he doesn't like playing for microphones. But Kempff has always been happy to record nonetheless, and is constantly polishing up his technique so as to render the most faithful possible service to his art, given the technological innovations that he has seen across his many years of recording, from acoustics to stereophony, by way of electric recording, 78rpm and the 33rpm microgroove.   He has recorded a lot of music since the start of his long career: Bach, Brahms, Schubert, but in particular, at 80%, he remains one of the greatest performers of his dear friend Beethoven. The recordings from this period are not always easy to date, because they could appear under many different matrix numbers, although they are in fact all the same version. Some famous sonatas, of course, have indeed been recorded many times: Pathétique as well as Clair de lune, Waldstein and Appassionata. The sonatas which figure in this album, recorded in Berlin in 1942 and 1943, make up what should have been a recording of the complete works, but which was interrupted by the war. Despite a fairly ephemeral French edition in the 1980s with the Dante label, these recordings were forgotten in favour of two later complete recordings, the first of which was produced in the 1950s and the second in the 1960s in stereophony.   Even if the surface sound is omnipresent in these re-recordings, it is quickly forgotten thanks to the painstaking restoration that has brought back Kempff's marvellously delicate touch. It is thrilling to follow in the footsteps of this towering musician, and compare him to himself across the years. In fact, his art has not aged as time has gone by, even if one notes the substantial difference in the discourse, the sound (depending on the piano used), the tempo and the formal construction. A document of the greatest musical interest. François Hudry © Qobuz 2017
£7.49

Classical - Released January 1, 2011 | Deutsche Grammophon Classics

Distinctions Diapason d'or - The Qobuz Ideal Discography
£23.49

Classical - Released January 1, 1992 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Distinctions Diapason d'or - The Qobuz Ideal Discography
£11.99

Keyboard Concertos - Released June 30, 2016 | APR

Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - Gramophone Editor's Choice
£7.99

Solo Piano - Released August 17, 2018 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
£44.99

Classical - Released January 1, 1988 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Distinctions Diapason d'or
£7.99

Classical - Released January 1, 1976 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
£7.99

Classical - Released January 1, 1970 | Deutsche Grammophon Classics

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
£55.99

Classical - Released January 1, 1995 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Distinctions Diapason d'or
£7.49

Classical - Released January 1, 1999 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
£46.99

Classical - Released January 1, 2008 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Distinctions Diapason d'or
£7.99

Classical - Released January 1, 1964 | Deutsche Grammophon Classics

Distinctions Diapason d'or
£11.49

Classical - Released January 1, 2000 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
£29.49
£20.99

Classical - Released May 27, 2016 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet
One could easily lose oneself in the meanderings of the many recordings by Wilhelm Kempff, which stretch out across the 55 years from 1920 to 1975, even though he never liked playing for the microphone. But nonetheless he has always been happy to record, and would constantly polish up his technique so as to render the most faithful possible service to his art, across both his own evolution and the technological innovations that he has seen through his many years of recording, from acoustics to stereophony. The great German pianist left behind him three complete recordings of Beethoven's sonatas. The first was in the 1930s, but it wasn't quite complete; the second in the 1950s; and a final collection, brought together in this recording, from the early 1960s, with stereo sound. Recorded quite quickly, considering the volume of material involved, between January 1964 and January 1965, in the studios of Hanover's Deutsche Grammophon Gesellschaft, it represents Wilhelm Kempff's final statement on Beethoven's work, having drawn closer to it over the course of several years. While the piano isn't without the odd harsh moment, this complete recording is of very even quality, and it brings out Kempff's free playing style which had brought Beethoven into the light, avoiding the heavy-handedness which German pianists had often inflicted on the composer. This search for clarity and simplicity came close to the improvisatory style that was Beethoven's hallmark, as he quickly "noted" whatever his imagination brought forth. © François Hudry/Qobuz
£18.99
£13.49

Classical - Released September 1, 1970 | Deutsche Grammophon Classics

Hi-Res
£17.99

Classical - Released January 1, 1994 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

There are few more sublime manifestations of the numinous in the mundane than Bach chorale prelude transcriptions sensitively played on the piano. Unfortunately, such things are now virtually forbidden by the authentic instrument law that does not permit Bach to be played on the piano, no matter how sensitively. In the past 20 years, there have been only two recordings of Bach chorale preludes: Murray Perahia's oh-so-sensitive performance and Paul Jacobs' just-the-facts performance. One has to reach further back than that to get good Bach. One has to go back to Wilhelm Kempff's magisterial 1975 recording transcriptions that he himself created to get good Bach back on the piano. On this album, Kempff plays eight chorale preludes plus a transcription of the flute Sicilliano and the Largo from the Harpsichord Concerto in F minor as well a Toccata and Fugue, an English Suite, a French Suite, the Capriccio on the Departure of a Beloved Brother, and excerpts from the Well-Tempered Clavier. All of these other performances are intelligently interpreted and well played despite Kempff's 80 years. But the heart of the recital is Kempff's performance of his transcriptions. They are magnificent. All of the qualities Kempff brings to his other Bach performances are here, too, but infused with an emotional intimacy and a spiritual grandeur elevating them as prayer is above poetry. There are depths and heights in Kempff's playing that are more religious than musical, and a profundity of interpretation that is beyond the mundane and partakes of the celestial. Only his transcription of Jesu, Joy of Man's Desiring is less than supreme, and that is only because here he is up against Dinu Lipatti's sublime performance. In every other performance and in every other way, this is one of the great Bach recitals.
£40.49

Classical - Released January 1, 2003 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

£28.99

Classical - Released January 1, 2001 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

£20.99

Classical - Released January 1, 2010 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Booklet