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£7.99

Classical - Released September 2, 2002 | Supraphon a.s.

Distinctions Diapason d'or - Choc du Monde de la Musique - 9 de Répertoire
£10.79
£7.19

Jazz - Released February 9, 2018 | Brownswood Recordings

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Indispensable JAZZ NEWS - Qobuzissime
And here we go again: London Calling! But this time, the call doesn’t come from the rock ‘n’ roll’s hungry depths but rather from the jazz’ ones. A jazz which we can only label as special so much the young London scene compiled on this We Out Here was built on mixed influences, soul as well as Afrobeat, fusion or electro. To center in on this new generation, Brownswood Recordings, Gilles Peterson’s label, entrusted the album’s artistic direction to the most publicized among them: saxophonist Shabaka Hutchings. Recorded over three days, the selected musicians and bands display a jazz spirit rather than jazz form. Therefore, drummer Jake Long and his formation Maisha play at being voodoo masters in the style of a Pharoah Sanders. Fela’s Afrobeat provides a fertile ground to the Ezra Collective from drummer Femi Koleoso but also to the Kokoroko Collective. While another drumming ace, the charismatic Moses Boyd, wraps up his rhythms in a brilliantly hypnotic electro loop before coming back to the paths of an invigorating libertarian jazz. This Qobuzism colorful like never before, includes instrumentals from the likes of Theon Cross, an impressive tuba marathoner (and incidentally an accomplice of Shabaka Hutchings within the Sons Of Kemet), Nubya Garcia, a saxophonist possessed by Charles Lloyd’s lyricism, and also Joe Armon-Jones, a keyboard mad scientist who knows Herbie Hancock like the back of his hand… With We Out Here, and the new London jazz scene pens a manifesto as dynamic as it is eclectic. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Chamber Music - Released November 3, 2017 | Warner Classics

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
The cream of the crop of French musicians—well, okay, Swiss for the flautist Emmanuel Pahud—come together to bring us a sumptuous album devoted to Debussy’s chamber music: Edgar Moreau for the Sonata for cello and piano, Renaud Capuçon for the Sonata for violin and piano, Gérard Caussé, Marie-Pierre Anglamet and Emmanuel Pahud for the Sonata for flute, viola and harp (these three very belated sonatas are the only ones that the composer had time to finish in his planned series of “Six sonatas for various instruments by Claude Debussy, French musician”). We find the same Emmanuel Pahud performing solo for Syrinx, and the album closes with the Trio for violin, piano and cello written in a still very classic—or even conventional—style and architecture (the shadows of Franck, Massenet and Fauré undoubtedly loom) in 1880, when the composer was residing in Florence with the von Meck family. This last work was released only a hundred years later… On the piano in all the collective works, you’ll find Bertrand Chamayou. © SM
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Full Operas - Released May 29, 2015 | La discothèque idéale de Diapason

Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - Le Choix de France Musique
£21.59
£14.39

Classical - Released January 22, 2016 | Ediciones Singulares

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4 étoiles de Classica
£19.19

Asia - Released January 20, 2017 | Buda musique

Distinctions 4F de Télérama - Songlines Five-star review
£8.63

Jazz - Released February 24, 2012 | ACT Music

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard - Hi-Res Audio
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Africa - Released October 28, 2016 | Numero Group

Distinctions Best New Reissue - Songlines Five-star review
Bobo Yéyé: Belle Époque in Upper Volta is a hefty, handsome box set; it's equal parts photo exhibit and musical anthology documenting the landlocked nation (now known as Burkina Faso) during the 1970s. It shines a light on Bobo-Dioulasso's music scene as an explosion of pop culture paved the way for 1983's coup d'etat led by Thomas Sankara (a former jazz musician) to rename the country. Revolution is a process, not an event, and this artifact offers one kind of proof. The 176-page hardbound book provides an introductory essay with a fine historical overview of colonial, post-colonial, and pre-revolutionary Upper Volta. A short note by photographer Sory Sanle offers his story, and is followed by dozens of his quietly stunning black-and-white photos that include studio portraits, promo shots of musicians, and night-time street scenes. There are biographies of the country's legendary groups Volta Jazz, Dafra Star (led by former -- and best -- VJ vocalist Coulibaly Tidiani), Echo del Africa, and Les Imbattables Leopards, and interviews. Full-color photos of various recordings adorn some pages, as do complete discographies of important labels. And, of course, there is the music. The set includes a disc each by Volta Jazz and Dafra Star. They offer rare tracks illustrating a startling crossroads where Malian and Nigerian melodies and rhythms collide with those of Ghana and Niger. Along the way, they encounter and build on Cuban rhythms, rock, and R&B sounds from the Americas. Check Volta Jazz's mind-melting "Mousso Koroba Tike." Fuzzed-up psychedelic wah-wah guitars and rock drums run headlong into highlife, accompanied by polyrhythmic hand drums and souled-out vocal harmonies. Contrast this with Dafra Star's fusion of call-and-response Malian folk and Latin-inspired funk in "Sie Koumgolo." Echo del Africa opens disc three with the cooking, Afrobeat-drenched funk of "Gentlemen Doromina." Later, they showcase a driving, Yoruban-cum-Juju pulse and chant in "Yiri Wah." Les Imbattables Leopards move through sweet, tender Afro-soul on "Milaoba" then get salsa-fied on "Nene." This disc also includes the popping dance number "He Ya Wanna" by Ouedraogo Youssef -- complete with Stax soul-styled horns -- and "Arindo" by Idy-O-Idrissa, a waltz-time R&B ballad whose melody derives from the Sahel folk tradition. Bobo Yéyé: Belle Époque in Upper Volta is one of Numero's most obsessively assembled artifacts, and given their high standards, that's saying plenty. While many labels release varied, excellent portraits of music from the African continent, Numero's project illustrates a particular place and time that laid the foundation for an entire people to build a nation. ~ Thom Jurek
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Classical - Released August 16, 2004 | Supraphon a.s.

Distinctions Diapason d'or - 10 de Classica-Répertoire
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Concertos - Released January 1, 2002 | Delos

Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Recommandé par Classica
£7.99

Concertos - Released January 1, 2002 | Delos

Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Recommandé par Classica
£71.99

Classical - Released January 5, 2018 | Warner Classics

Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama
EDITORIAL NOTES: This complete edition brings together all Debussy’s known works. The one work that is not currently available is the orchestral version of an Intermezzo composed in June 1882. However, it is possible to form an idea of how this might have sounded thanks to Debussy’s own transcription of the piece for piano duet (7/6)2. The following works can be heard here in premiere recordings: —the Chanson des brises (1882) for soprano solo, female chorus and piano four-hands (24/12), the complete manuscript of which has recently come to light; —the first version (1898) of the two Chansons de Charles d’Orléans (25/5-6); —Diane au bois (1885-87), a “comédie lyrique” for soprano, tenor and piano (26/1-4); —the beginning of La Chute de la maison Usher, as it was when Debussy set the work aside in 1916 (30/6-10);   To this group of works, we have added the piano reductions of Khamma (4/13-16) – whose orchestration was mainly the work of Koechlin – and of Jeux (4/17), both of which provided the basis on which the choreography of the two ballets was devised. Moreover, some of Debussy’s transcriptions from the 1890s have never been recorded until now: —À la fontaine, an arrangement for piano solo of Am Springbrunnen from Schumann’s Op.85 set of piano duets (2/20); —Humoresque en forme de valse, an arrangement for piano solo of Raff’s Humoreske in Walzerform, Op.159, for piano duet (6/9); —Saint-Saëns’ Symphony No.2 and Airs d’Étienne Marcel, arranged for two pianos, four hands (11/8-18);   In addition to the above, we have included several arrangements of Debussy’s works made by composers with whom he was on friendly terms. The complete edition contains all the transcriptions by André Caplet (for piano solo, two pianos and orchestrations), even those carried out after Debussy’s death. Caplet’s orchestrations of two of the Ariettes oubliées (22/1415) are recorded here for the first time. Most of Caplet’s transcriptions received Debussy’s seal of approval, and the composer conducted the orchestral version of Children’s Corner (18/12-17) on several occasions and took part in performances of the two-piano version of Ibéria (10/57). The same applies to the arrangements made by Henri Busser, Jean Roger-Ducasse, Désiré-Émile Inghelbrecht and Bernardino Molinari. Ravel’s transcriptions and orchestrations are testimony to his admiration for Debussy. Finally, it is worth noting that Debussy was on good terms with the violinist Arthur Hartmann and transcribed Minstrels (13/3), one of the piano Préludes, for his friend. The two men played the piece together at a concert on 5 February 1914, alongside two arrangements that Hartmann had made with the composer’s consent: another of the Préludes, La fille aux cheveux de lin (13/15), and the second of the Ariettes oubliées, Il pleure dans mon cœur (13/14). Finally, this set features the only known acoustic recording of Debussy, accompanying Mary Garden (33/15-18) and made in February 1904 for the French Gramophone Company, as well as piano rolls of fourteen pieces made using the Welte-Mignon system and probably recorded by the composer in November 1913 (33/1-14). Denis Herlin © 2017 Warner Classics
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Children - Released June 22, 2007 | Disney Records (Europe)

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
£15.99

Chamber Music - Released May 30, 2014 | La discothèque idéale de Diapason

Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or
£7.99

Jazz - Released November 6, 2015 | BDMUSIC

Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama
£9.99
£7.49

Pop - Released July 25, 2011 | Legacy Recordings

Hi-Res Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
Featuring Phil Spector's "Wall of Sound" in its prime and his early stable of artists, the Ronettes, Crystals, Darlene Love, and Bob B. Soxx & the Blue Jeans, A Christmas Gift for You From Phil Spector stands as inarguably the greatest Christmas record of all time. Spector believed he could produce a record for the holidays that would capture not only the essence of the Christmas spirit, but also be a pop masterpiece that would stand against any work these artists had already done. He succeeded on every level, with all four groups/singers recording some of their most memorable performances. This is the Christmas album by which all later holiday releases had to be judged, and it has inspired a host of imitators. ~ Dennis MacDonald
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Duets - Released December 1, 2017 | Les Indispensables de Diapason

Distinctions Diapason d'or
£8.39
£5.59

Electro - Released January 6, 2017 | InFiné

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama
£9.59

Film Soundtracks - Released May 16, 2011 | Editions Milan Music

Booklet Distinctions Choc de Classica
£12.99

Musical Theatre - Released June 8, 2004 | Masterworks Broadway

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
Classical composer/conductor Leonard Bernstein periodically had tried his hand at writing Broadway musicals, starting with On the Town (1944) and continuing with Wonderful Town, (1953), not to mention, less than a year earlier, Candide, a musically magnificent, dramatically unsuccessful effort. But none of these was as ambitious as West Side Story, a score that is infused with Bernstein's classical sensibility, even as it deliberately draws in influences from jazz and Latin music. A contemporary retelling of Romeo & Juliet set among New York street gangs, the show combines refined and vulgar elements, and Bernstein's music revels in the contrasts, veering from the hymn-like themes he provides for the lovers' ballads (they may be Italians on one side and Puerto Ricans on the other, but they're probably all Catholics, so the religious influence is something they have in common) to the jarring rhythms that accompany the continual "rumbles" of the gangs. Newcomer lyricist Stephen Sondheim traces the same contrast in his words. For the Romeo character, here called Tony, the mere name of his Juliet, here called Maria, has religious significance: "Say it loud and there's music playing," he sings in a song called "Maria," "Say it soft and it's almost like praying." In this song, as in their duets "Tonight" and "One Hand, One Heart," Tony and Maria are not just idealistic, but idealized, and Larry Kert and Carol Lawrence embody them well. On the other hand, Sondheim fills the language of their friends with a rough slang that sometimes alludes to common obscenity (e.g., "when the spit hits the fan") and sometimes pushes the limits of language allowable on a Broadway stage in the '50s ("bastard," "S.O.B."). When they're not cursing, these characters engage in biting criticism and sarcasm. "America," a song of dueling Puerto Rican girls, one who wants to go home and one who wants to stay in Manhattan (the fiery Anita, ably played by Chita Rivera), and "Gee, Officer Krupke!," a gang's taunting of a police officer, are not just typical comic songs in a Broadway musical. They are savagely witty, marking the introduction of a lyricist on a par with Lorenz Hart or Cole Porter, at the very least. That said, however, this isn't really a lyric-oriented show, or even a character-oriented one, oddly enough. It is notable that the album cover says, "West Side Story (based on a conception of Jerome Robbins)," not "based on a play by William Shakespeare." Robbins, the show's director/choreographer, has conceived it as a dance show, and there are extended instrumental passages on this album during which the stage actors would be dancing, although one only hears them shouting occasionally and snapping their fingers. Powerful as Bernstein's music is, and clever as Sondheim's lyrics are, West Side Story is largely about dancing, which means that only a portion of it can be appreciated on disc. That is enough, however, to mark it as a landmark among Broadway cast albums as well as Broadway musicals. ~ William Ruhlmann