Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

HI-RES£15.49
CD£12.49

Alternative & Indie - Released March 6, 2020 | 4AD

Hi-Res Distinctions Pitchfork: Best New Music
HI-RES£15.49
CD£12.49

Alternative & Indie - Released February 16, 2018 | 4AD

Hi-Res Distinctions Pitchfork: Best New Music
CD£12.49

Alternative & Indie - Released February 16, 2018 | 4AD

On 2015's Half Free, U.S. Girls' Meg Remy combined some of the project's earlier tape loop experimentation and use of samples with the more polished avant pop of its previous album, GEM. Three years later, she returns with yet a different approach, collaborating with improvisational music collective the Cosmic Range for a dedicated live sound that lives and breathes like a festival stage. (U.S. Girls) In a Poem Unlimited features a six-piece core version of the Toronto funk-fusion band -- one of whom is Remy's husband and frequent collaborator Maximilian Turnbull, aka Slim Twig -- along with over a dozen additional guests. Those guests include keyboardist/programmer Rich Morel, who accompanies Remy alone on two of the songs, "Rosebud" and "Poem," which he also co-wrote. They provide a synth-poppy breather about a third and two-thirds of the way through the track list, at the same time further expanding the album's sound. So, too, do a pair of brief spoken word recordings, also balanced in the sequencing. At the other extreme, the jammiest song in the set is certainly the closer, a cover of Micah Blue Smaldone's "Time." At seven and a half minutes, it's by far the record's longest track, seeming to celebrate the collaboration in encore style, with prominent bongos and saxophones among instruments that add to the Cosmic Range's more regularly featured rhythm section, synths, and guitars. Far from an afterthought, the album's lyrics speak candidly on topics like sexism and violence -- domestic, terrorist, and state-sanctioned -- such as on "M.A.H." ("Mad as Hell"), which addresses the latter via an arty disco. Sprawling and complex as In a Poem Unlimited's structures and styles are, it's U.S. Girls' most immediate collection to date, in terms of both sound and message. © Marcy Donelson /TiVo
CD£12.49

Alternative & Indie - Released March 6, 2020 | 4AD

HI-RES£15.49
CD£12.49

Alternative & Indie - Released September 25, 2015 | 4AD

Hi-Res
Half Free is the 4AD debut for Meg Remy's U.S. Girls project, and while the album maintains the accessibility and increased production values of her previous album, 2012's Gem, it also revisits some of the tape loop experimentation and dark subject matter of her older works. The album credits ten people among its performing roster, including Canadian hip-hop producer Onakabazien (who co-produced U.S. Girls' 2013 EP Free Advice Column) and Remy's husband Slim Twig, but the album's crushed, grainy loops and collage-like construction make it feel less like the work of a live band than Gem did. Two of the tracks, including molasses-slow opener "Sororal Feelings," are built around samples of obscure soul singles (not an uncommon sample in Remy's work), and most of the other songs retain a similar spirit. First single "Damn That Valley" is the clearest realization yet of Remy's offbeat pop vision, with a dubby bassline and ticking drum machine backing up her brassy, Ronnie Spector-like vocals, and a river of bizarre, subtle effects flowing underneath. "Sed Knife" (a remake of an older U.S. Girls song previously released as the B-side of a 2012 7" single) is the album's most straightforward rock song, combining heavy glam riffs with howling (albeit somewhat buried) saxophone. Perhaps the album's most stunning moment is "Navy & Cream," which marries the slowed-down Muzak aesthetic of vaporwave with Remy's clear, sweet vocals, resulting in a magnificently warped slow jam. Similarly, the album's seven-minute finale "Woman's Work" features gloriously hazy production and a pulsating synth bassline, as well as a fierce, dramatic vocal performance. Remy's lyrics focus on the harsh, unforgiving aspects of relationships, and the inclusion of "Telephone Play No. 1" (a phone conversation that jokingly touches on bizarre aspects of parent-child relationships) takes the album down a disturbing path. Overall, Half Free straddles a neat balance between bittersweet pop hooks and murky, adventurous production. © Paul Simpson /TiVo
CD£8.99

Pop - Released October 26, 2011 | (K-raa-k)3

CD£12.49

Alternative & Indie - Released September 25, 2015 | 4AD

CD£8.99

Alternative & Indie - Released August 12, 2008 | Siltbreeze

CD£8.99

Alternative & Indie - Released February 2, 2010 | Siltbreeze

HI-RES£1.49
CD£1.49

Alternative & Indie - Released October 5, 2017 | 4AD

Hi-Res
CD£8.49
Gem

Electronic - Released October 22, 2012 | Fatcat Records

Meghan Remy's U.S. Girls project has always been a shapeshifting affair. Its earliest incarnations saw Remy creating raw solo sonics with an enormous reel-to-reel tape machine, and subsequent albums have filtered through post-industrial Throbbing Gristle-style harshness to skewed pop songs based on ragged loops of crusty girl group samples. Gem is by no means a debut for U.S. Girls, but it's easily the most polished, traditional, and realized work from the project yet, hiding the prickly noise edges that defined earlier albums under layers of studio gloss and easily recognizable pop. The album begins with some blown-out tones on what sounds like a weathered spool of tape, but quickly launches into the dreamy pop of "Another Color," an eerie full-band tune somewhere between Kate Bush's synth-driven stargazing and incidental music from Twin Peaks. The mood is thick and desolate, but doesn't stick around too long. A creeping glam groove sneaks into the picture on the noisy "Work from Home" and comes in full force on standout track "Jack," with Remy's vocals channeling Marc Bolan's sultry melodics and oozy guitars bleeding effected leads all over this incredibly catchy cover of little-known early-'90s songwriter Brock Robinson. The glam side of U.S. Girls also shows up in the Gary Glitter drums and boisterous handclaps of "Slim Baby," possibly a devotional anthem to album producer Slim Twig. Remy touches on and improves upon most previous phases of her work on Gem. Reverberated drum machine clicks point to her earliest rudimentary recording style, and there's even a full-on noise collage in the form of "Curves." She pays homage to her love of '60s AM pop with a faithful cover of Joe South's wrong-side-of-the-tracks love song "Down in the Boondocks," updating it only with crunchy guitar leads and echoey production. The song-by-song stylistic hopping makes Gem something of a mixed bag, but also keeps the momentum of the album going where earlier U.S. Girls recordings could sometimes lag. Remy's greatest gift has always been her unique ability to dismantle and reassemble the pop form in a single song, and Gem is the most vivid document of that gift yet. © Fred Thomas /TiVo
CD£1.49

Alternative & Indie - Released August 31, 2018 | 4AD

CD£0.99

Rock - Released September 17, 2012 | Fatcat Records

CD£1.49

Alternative & Indie - Released August 31, 2018 | 4AD

CD£0.99

Rock - Released November 12, 2012 | Fatcat Records

CD£1.49

Alternative & Indie - Released October 5, 2017 | 4AD