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Folk - Released August 12, 1986 | Flying Fish

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Folk - Released January 1, 1983 | Flying Fish

Even a Gray Day captures Tom Paxton in a perfect setting, with the simple accompaniment of his own guitar, the acoustic stringed instruments of David Bromberg, and vocal harmonies from Anne Hills-Burda and Peggy Compton. On this collection, Paxton foregoes topical satire for the timeless beauty of some of his finest ballads, with the primary subject matter being romantic love and the complexities thereof. There are newly recorded classics from the Paxton catalog, like "I Give You the Morning," "Outward Bound," "Dance in the Shadows," and the oft-recorded "The Last Thing on My Mind." There are also new compositions, including the title track. Because the emphasis here is on his serious, thoughtful side, Even a Gray Day is one of Tom Paxton's most enduring, endlessly enjoyable recordings. © Jim Newsom /TiVo
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Folk - Released January 1, 1985 | Flying Fish

Tom Paxton writes beautiful ballads and sarcastic topical satires; this disc is devoted to the latter side. The songs here may sound a bit dated years down the road, but listening to the lyrics is like reading a newspaper from the early to mid-'80s, a newspaper published by some skewed skeptic skilled at condensing the issues of the day down to their absurd essence. The folkie melodies are all familiar, with the overall musical feel of the album straight out of the coffeehouse era of the early '60s in which Paxton got his start. "Yuppies in the Sky" is Paxton at his best, singing "condos for sale, condos to buy" to the tune of the cowboy classic "Ghost Riders in the Sky." The vanishing American family farm is lamented in "Who Will Feed the People," and the end of American manufacturing is chronicled in "Factory Whistle's Blowing." Paxton is hilarious in lampooning the importance (or lack thereof) of yacht racing in "The Day We Lost the America's Cup," and the sports history footnote in which the U.S. and U.S.S.R. traded Olympic boycotts is immortalized in "We Can Have the Olympics Over at Our House." © Jim Newsom /TiVo
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Folk - Released January 1, 1988 | Flying Fish

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Folk - Released October 21, 1991 | Flying Fish

Veteran folk-pop singer Tom Paxton was still delivering excellent albums in the early 1990s, one fine example being It Ain't Easy. Paxton was always a thoughtful lyricist and a masterful storyteller, and as usual, he gives us a lot to think about. "Billy Got Some Bad News Today" describes a man who has just learned he has a serious illness, while "Living the Street Life" examines the horrors of homelessness without preaching. "Something Going On" finds Paxton portraying a parent whose son is using crack cocaine, and on "Mister Can't-Go-On," he tries to dissuade a man from committing suicide. True to form, Paxton really makes us feel for his characters -- from the man calling a suicide prevention hotline to the homeless man, the singer-songwriter brings these individuals to life in a most insightful, moving fashion. © Alex Henderson /TiVo