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R&B - Released September 30, 2005 | Parlophone UK

Capitol's 2005 collection All the Best weighs in at only 18 tracks, which is a little bit light to truly contain all of the best songs Tina Turner has recorded over her lengthy career. And, truth be told, it doesn't come close to containing all of her best -- it concentrates on material she recorded from her '80s comeback, Private Dancer, on, stretching all the way into the '90s but focusing on such '80s hits as "What's Love Got to Do with It," "Private Dancer," "The Best," "Better Be Good to Me," "Typical Male," and "We Don't Need Another Hero (Thunderdome)," adding her biggest '90s hit, "I Don't Wanna Fight," plus a couple of OK but forgettable new songs. The classic 1973 version of "Nutbush City Limits" is here, but it's the only Ike & Tina cut; the version of "Proud Mary" is taken from the soundtrack of her 1993 biopic What's Love Got to Do with It. That highlights the problem with All the Best -- it has many of the big hits, but for one reason or another ignores the music on which her legend is built. Still, as a summation of her comeback and beyond, it's good, and for fans who favor this sound, it's a good disc to have. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Soul - Released June 29, 2015 | Capitol

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When she released Private Dancer in 1984, Tina Turner was already 45 years old and had a solid career behind her. Alongside her ex, the violent but brilliant Ike Turner (they divorced in 1978 after 16 years of marital hell that she described in a book), she sang soul and rhythm’n’blues like no one else before, venturing into other genres. But her solo début didn’t interest many people, especially since at the beginning of the ‘80s vintage soul was no longer popular. Supported by the record label Capitol, the Tennessee lioness decided to immerse soul in a blend of rock FM and synth pop. This resulted in her reaching the top of the charts and a boost to her career, mostly thanks to the hit What’s Love Got to Do With It. Tina Turner also enjoyed being more daring and covering songs as diverse as Private Dancer by Dire Straits (with Jeff Beck on guitar), Help! by The Beatles, 1984 by David Bowie but also soul classics like I Can’t Stand The Rain by Ann Peebles and Let’s Stay Together by Al Green. An eclectic repertoire that is accompanied perfectly by her fierce feline voice. © Clotilde Maréchal/Qobuz
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R&B - Released September 30, 1991 | Parlophone UK

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Rock - Released June 15, 1993 | Parlophone UK

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Pop - Released September 30, 2008 | Parlophone UK

Booklet
Released as a tie-in to Tina Turner's fall 2008 tour of North America, Tina! follows her last greatest-hits album All the Best: The Hits by a mere three years and it has the same number of tracks as its predecessor, six of which are songs shared between the two compilations. This makes Tina! feel similar to All the Best but it's a different compilation in many ways, with a broader scope, reaching back for "River Deep Mountain High" and "The Acid Queen," neither of which were on the 2005 comp, and containing two previously unreleased bonus tracks. It also contains a hefty dose of live tracks -- "Let's Stay Together," "I Can't Stand the Rain," and "The Best," are all present in live versions -- her James Bond theme "Goldeneye" and a 1993 re-recording of "Proud Mary." So, Tina! covers a lot of ground and gives a pretty good indication of Turner's far-reaching talents and long-ranging career, but it's also a bit of a mess, jumping between eras, overlooking some big hits, and substituting live versions when the studio is superior. So don't think of Tina! as a definitive comp, something that has yet to be assembled on Tina, but rather as a sampler that contains some, but not nearly all, of her best. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Rock - Released September 13, 1989 | Parlophone UK

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R&B - Released March 16, 1988 | Parlophone UK

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Blues - Released September 28, 2009 | Parlophone UK

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Pop - Released February 27, 2009 | Parlophone UK

The Platinum Collection is a beefed-up, triple-disc version of Tina!, a far-reaching if haphazardly assembled Tina Turner compilation released in the run-up to her 2008 world tour. Whereas Tina! was released in North America, The Platinum Collection was released in Europe a few months later in anticipation of the European leg of her tour. The Platinum Collection is almost definitive at 48 tracks in length. It includes all of Turner's major hits, including six Ike & Tina Turner-era recordings ("Nutbush City Limits," "River Deep, Mountain High," "I Want to Take You Higher," "Get Back," "Come Together," "Proud Mary"), and goes all the way up to the latter-day hits "When the Heartache Is Over" and "Whatever You Need" from her most recent studio album, Twenty Four Seven (1999), and "Open Arms," the one-off single from her best-of compilation All the Best (2004). In addition to all the hits, The Platinum Collection includes a couple new songs co-written by Guy Chambers ("It Would Be a Crime," "I'm Ready"), and fortunately it also includes her stunning collaboration with Italian superstar Eros Ramazzotti on his 1998 hit "Cose Della Vita." Unlike Tina!, The Platinum Collection includes the studio versions of "I Can't Stand the Rain" and "Let's Stay Together" rather than live recordings. All in all, The Platinum Collection is a treasure trove of hits by Turner. Not only does it include all of her solo hits, but it also includes several songs released by others on which she is featured as a guest (e.g., "Tonight" with David Bowie, "Tearing Us Apart" with Eric Clapton, "It Takes Two" with Rod Stewart). © Jason Birchmeier /TiVo
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Soul - Released June 26, 2015 | Capitol

When she released Private Dancer in 1984, Tina Turner was already 45 years old and had a solid career behind her. Alongside her ex, the violent but brilliant Ike Turner (they divorced in 1978 after 16 years of marital hell that she described in a book), she sang soul and rhythm’n’blues like no one else before, venturing into other genres. But her solo début didn’t interest many people, especially since at the beginning of the ‘80s vintage soul was no longer popular. Supported by the record label Capitol, the Tennessee lioness decided to immerse soul in a blend of rock FM and synth pop. This resulted in her reaching the top of the charts and a boost to her career, mostly thanks to the hit What’s Love Got to Do With It. Tina Turner also enjoyed being more daring and covering songs as diverse as Private Dancer by Dire Straits (with Jeff Beck on guitar), Help! by The Beatles, 1984 by David Bowie but also soul classics like I Can’t Stand The Rain by Ann Peebles and Let’s Stay Together by Al Green. An eclectic repertoire that is accompanied perfectly by her fierce feline voice. © Clotilde Maréchal/Qobuz
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R&B - Released January 10, 1986 | Parlophone UK

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Pop - Released February 3, 2014 | Rhino

Romance isn't the first word associated with Tina Turner but there's little doubt that the soul singer knows her way around a love song, so compiling an 18-song collection of the best of those romantic tunes makes sense. The 2014 compilation Love Songs, however, bends the rules of what qualifies as a love song, finding space for her arena rock anthem "The Best," "What's Love Got to Do with It?," the adult contemporary standard "I Don't Want to Fight," and Ike & Tina's "River Deep, Mountain High," which may be about love but is bombastic in the way none of the other 17 songs here are. That quick list of songs reveals how many of her hits are here -- also included are "Let's Stay Together," "Missing You," "Private Dancer," and "When the Heartache Is Over," her second-to-last Top 40 Adult Contemporary single; missing are tougher songs like 'Typical Male," "One of the Living," "Better Be Good to Me," and "We Don't Need Another Hero" -- and this is why Love Songs is an imperfect but generally worthwhile comp; it has just enough big songs to warrant a purchase and, through a selection of album tracks from the '80s and '90s, it sustains its highly polished romantic mood fairly well. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Rock - Released April 1, 1996 | Parlophone UK

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Rock - Released April 1, 1996 | Parlophone UK

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Rock - Released November 1, 1999 | Parlophone UK

The album is actually credited to just Tina, and no one has earned the right to a single moniker more than the former Mrs. Turner. Now over 60, Tina has picked a suite of songs about survival, a topic she knows well, and imbued them with as much soul as she can muster. Tina still puts Mariah Carey and Celine Dion to shame. But unfortunately, on Twenty Four Seven, the famous Turner passion is often submerged in glossy production that virtually defines "adult contemporary." In some transcendent moments, Tina reminds us of the woman who sang "River Deep, Mountain High" -- like when she spits out "I've never been a winner but I still play the game" in "All the Woman," or during the powerful coda to "I Will Be There." As Tina sings in "Absolutely Nothing's Changed," she's lived to fight another day, and that's proof she ain't been broken. © Mark Morgenstein /TiVo
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Pop - Released January 1, 1991 | Bella Musica Edition

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Disco - Released October 6, 2015 | Decoration Day

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Rock - Released January 27, 2020 | Vox Humana

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Soul - Released June 26, 2015 | Capitol

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When she released Private Dancer in 1984, Tina Turner was already 45 years old and had a solid career behind her. Alongside her ex, the violent but brilliant Ike Turner (they divorced in 1978 after 16 years of marital hell that she described in a book), she sang soul and rhythm’n’blues like no one else before, venturing into other genres. But her solo début didn’t interest many people, especially since at the beginning of the ‘80s vintage soul was no longer popular. Supported by the record label Capitol, the Tennessee lioness decided to immerse soul in a blend of rock FM and synth pop. This resulted in her reaching the top of the charts and a boost to her career, mostly thanks to the hit What’s Love Got to Do With It. Tina Turner also enjoyed being more daring and covering songs as diverse as Private Dancer by Dire Straits (with Jeff Beck on guitar), Help! by The Beatles, 1984 by David Bowie but also soul classics like I Can’t Stand The Rain by Ann Peebles and Let’s Stay Together by Al Green. An eclectic repertoire that is accompanied perfectly by her fierce feline voice. © Clotilde Maréchal/Qobuz
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Pop - Released July 17, 2016 | Glory Days Records