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Country - Released July 10, 2020 | Big Machine Records, LLC

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Tim McGraw calls his 15th solo album Here on Earth but he's pictured floating in the cosmos on its cover. The music contained within doesn't quite settle the contradiction between the heavens and terra firma yet the starry-eyed artwork does capture an essential element of the album, particularly in how it feels as slick and stylish as an airbrushed van. McGraw isn't rocking in the slightest here, though. Here on Earth rolls smooth and easy, filled with breezy ballads, country trifles, and sweetened R&B, songs that keep the focus on McGraw's sentimental side. Often, this doubles as his seductive side, sometimes in slightly unpredictable ways, as when he compliments a woman for reminding him about how awestruck he was when he heard Sheryl Crow on the radio for the first time (he would've already been a Top Ten hitmaker by that point). A lot of Here on Earth focuses on familial love and long-term relationships, the kind of attachments that deepen when middle age advances. McGraw has long been in this kind of comfortable groove, at least thematically, so it's to his credit that he allows this record to be so lush it almost seems opulent. The opening cut "L.A." is so ornate it evokes memories of prime Glen Campbell, and if the rest of the album doesn't quite reach these heights there's enough mellow melodrama to hold the listener's attention even as the album veers toward cozy comfort. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Country - Released July 10, 2020 | Big Machine Records, LLC

Tim McGraw calls his 15th solo album Here on Earth but he's pictured floating in the cosmos on its cover. The music contained within doesn't quite settle the contradiction between the heavens and terra firma yet the starry-eyed artwork does capture an essential element of the album, particularly in how it feels as slick and stylish as an airbrushed van. McGraw isn't rocking in the slightest here, though. Here on Earth rolls smooth and easy, filled with breezy ballads, country trifles, and sweetened R&B, songs that keep the focus on McGraw's sentimental side. Often, this doubles as his seductive side, sometimes in slightly unpredictable ways, as when he compliments a woman for reminding him about how awestruck he was when he heard Sheryl Crow on the radio for the first time (he would've already been a Top Ten hitmaker by that point). A lot of Here on Earth focuses on familial love and long-term relationships, the kind of attachments that deepen when middle age advances. McGraw has long been in this kind of comfortable groove, at least thematically, so it's to his credit that he allows this record to be so lush it almost seems opulent. The opening cut "L.A." is so ornate it evokes memories of prime Glen Campbell, and if the rest of the album doesn't quite reach these heights there's enough mellow melodrama to hold the listener's attention even as the album veers toward cozy comfort. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Country - Released October 21, 2016 | Curb Records

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Country - Released November 17, 2017 | Arista Nashville

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A storybook example of a successful marriage, Tim McGraw and Faith Hill are no stranger to each other's records -- a year after the wedding, Hill appeared on McGraw's 1997 single, "It's Your Love" -- but The Rest of Our Life is the first time they've recorded a full album together. Fittingly, the record is about being in a long-term relationship, and while the album is proudly soothing, neither singer shies away from the realities of advancing age. McGraw sings about his greying hair and expanding waistline on the title track -- a song co-written by international sensation Ed Sheeran -- and there are allusions to tough times on "Break First" and "Damn Good at Holding On," but these are details that fade into the sumptuous production masterminded by the duo and Bryon Gallimore. All three have built The Rest of Our Life for comfort; it's an album designed to be played on lazy Sunday afternoons, on long drives, and doing housework, a soundtrack to everyday life. As such, it can veer toward background music, but it's enlivened by the chemistry between McGraw and Hill. After 20 years of marriage, they still seem smitten with each other, and that palpable affection is not only endearing, it sustains the album. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Country - Released November 20, 2020 | Big Machine Records, LLC

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Tim McGraw left Curb for Big Machine in 2013, nearly two decades deep into his career. He stayed with the label into the 2020s, releasing Here on Earth the first year of that decade, but McGraw Machine Hits covers his 2010s, rounding up ten hits in its basic version, adding "Truck Yeah" to the digital incarnation, and adding three covers to its deluxe edition: a version of the Cars' "Drive," a duet with Florida Georgia Line on "May We All," and a cover of the Bellamy Brothers' "Redneck Girl" cut with Midland. These are nice additions to a solid set that finds McGraw digging deeper into his mellow tendencies, emphasizing his empathetic side on "Humble and Kind" and "Meanwhile Back at Mama's," nodding at R&B on "Diamond Rings and Old Barstools" and bringing in Taylor Swift for bittersweet harmonies on "The Highway Don't Care." Collectively, these singles veer toward the smooth side, but they do showcase a mature McGraw who seems very comfortable in his own skin. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Country - Released June 16, 2015 | Curb Records

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Country - Released August 21, 2020 | Big Machine Records, LLC

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Tim McGraw calls his 15th solo album Here on Earth but he's pictured floating in the cosmos on its cover. The music contained within doesn't quite settle the contradiction between the heavens and terra firma yet the starry-eyed artwork does capture an essential element of the album, particularly in how it feels as slick and stylish as an airbrushed van. McGraw isn't rocking in the slightest here, though. Here on Earth rolls smooth and easy, filled with breezy ballads, country trifles, and sweetened R&B, songs that keep the focus on McGraw's sentimental side. Often, this doubles as his seductive side, sometimes in slightly unpredictable ways, as when he compliments a woman for reminding him about how awestruck he was when he heard Sheryl Crow on the radio for the first time (he would've already been a Top Ten hitmaker by that point). A lot of Here on Earth focuses on familial love and long-term relationships, the kind of attachments that deepen when middle age advances. McGraw has long been in this kind of comfortable groove, at least thematically, so it's to his credit that he allows this record to be so lush it almost seems opulent. The opening cut "L.A." is so ornate it evokes memories of prime Glen Campbell, and if the rest of the album doesn't quite reach these heights there's enough mellow melodrama to hold the listener's attention even as the album veers toward cozy comfort. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Country - Released February 5, 2013 | Universal Music

After years of the strain of legal battles to get out of his contract with Curb Records, Tim McGraw emerges, relaxed and refreshed with Two Lanes of Freedom, his debut recording for Big Machine, co-produced with longtime collaborator Byron Gallimore. McGraw may be celebrating his independence, but he still understands what he needs to get played on country radio as evidenced by the collision of neo-traditionalist melody and hard rock guitars on the pre-release single "Truck Yeah (there are two versions on this set; one is live). His finger popping meld of pop, Southern soul, and contemporary pop on "Southern Girl" uses Auto-Tune in the chorus, and it actually works (why this wasn't chosen as a single is a head scratcher). "Highway Don't Care" -- a duet with Taylor Swift (a thank you for namechecking him in her first big hit) with a killer guitar solo from Keith Urban -- borrows some production cues from Swift's playbook to excellent effect. The hook is irresistible and McGraw's vocal, paired with the young singer's, is a perfect match. This track is actually a real clue as to what McGraw's about these days, wanting to be the perfect combination of pop, country, and rock in one persona. "One of These Nights" is classic McGraw, a midtempo paean to his protagonists object of desire. It's a love song in a sense, but to the nostalgia of the future, not a woman. "Mexicoma" is a pre-hangover heartbreak tune combining a country two-step with a norteño polka; Mike Rojas' accordion is a nice touch, especially where it meets the distorted slide guitars, upright piano, and horns. "Friend of a Friend" is a "talking to you while you're not here" love song. McGraw's protagonist tenderly offers the lyrics as an incantation, straight into the ear of the absent, longed-for other. The title track is saturated with contemporary country tropes, with enough rock & roll riffing to make it a perfect second single. "It's Your World" is a rock & roll screamer, a guaranteed barroom dancefloor anthem. Despite its wide range of material and experimentation, this is the pop record McGraw has always wanted to make. He packs in a little of everything here, and some of it stumbles: "Annie I Owe You a Dance" has too many strings, and the poignant, "37405," a narrative about a country singer turned convict, could have been leaner. But these are small complaints on a solid and ambitious recording. On Two Lanes of Freedom, McGraw proves he is indeed the artist that Curb never let him be. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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Country - Released August 21, 2020 | Big Machine Records, LLC

Tim McGraw calls his 15th solo album Here on Earth but he's pictured floating in the cosmos on its cover. The music contained within doesn't quite settle the contradiction between the heavens and terra firma yet the starry-eyed artwork does capture an essential element of the album, particularly in how it feels as slick and stylish as an airbrushed van. McGraw isn't rocking in the slightest here, though. Here on Earth rolls smooth and easy, filled with breezy ballads, country trifles, and sweetened R&B, songs that keep the focus on McGraw's sentimental side. Often, this doubles as his seductive side, sometimes in slightly unpredictable ways, as when he compliments a woman for reminding him about how awestruck he was when he heard Sheryl Crow on the radio for the first time (he would've already been a Top Ten hitmaker by that point). A lot of Here on Earth focuses on familial love and long-term relationships, the kind of attachments that deepen when middle age advances. McGraw has long been in this kind of comfortable groove, at least thematically, so it's to his credit that he allows this record to be so lush it almost seems opulent. The opening cut "L.A." is so ornate it evokes memories of prime Glen Campbell, and if the rest of the album doesn't quite reach these heights there's enough mellow melodrama to hold the listener's attention even as the album veers toward cozy comfort. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Country - Released March 27, 2007 | Curb Records

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Country - Released January 27, 2017 | Atlantic Records

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Country - Released August 17, 2004 | Curb Records

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Country - Released March 28, 2006 | Curb Records

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Country - Released January 13, 2021 | Big Machine Records, LLC

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Country - Released November 26, 2002 | Curb Records

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Country - Released June 3, 1997 | Curb Records

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Country - Released March 22, 1994 | Curb Records

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Country - Released November 6, 2015 | Big Machine Records, LLC

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There's an edge, a defiance to the title of Damn Country Music that may not surface in the music, yet it still taps into the essence of Tim McGraw's appeal: he doesn't bother with crossover, he stays true to country and doesn't care who knows it. Thing is, McGraw's definition of country music is quite flexible, something Damn Country Music makes plain. Other singers who pledge allegiance to country music are often rooted in some kind of hardcore twang -- a bit of old Texas honky tonk or perhaps Southern-fried country-rock -- but at his core, McGraw is a soft touch, easily adapting to the shifts in time without ever seeming like he's following fashion. So it is with Damn Country Music, where he spends as much time singing over gently rolling electronic loops as he does over cavernous echoing guitars suggesting so much as prime U2. Such flexibility also encompasses plenty of chipper midtempo anthems and soft-focused ballads, songs connected by their quietly insistent melodies and McGraw's equally easy touch; he never pushes too hard, a skill that's especially needed when he's piling up the platitudes on "Humble and Kind," but is always welcome no matter the tune. What's remarkable about this exceedingly laid-back album is that while it clearly exists within the confines of mature, modern country-pop, never pandering to either the bro upstarts or a crossover audience, it still feels country, because it feels true to McGraw's roots. Even during his '90s heyday, he looked over his shoulder while living in the present, happily threading in trends while seeming impervious to them. This skill is difficult to acquire but Damn Country Music, like so many other Tim McGraw albums, makes it seem as simple as breathing © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Country - Released October 7, 2008 | Curb Records

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Country - Released April 24, 2001 | Curb Records