Your basket is empty

Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

From
HI-RES£18.99
CD£13.49

Country - Released April 30, 2021 | The Valory Music Co.

Hi-Res
The very title "Country Again" suggests Thomas Rhett strayed from country music at some point. To an extent, that is true. Rhett scaled the upper reaches of Billboard's Country charts in the 2010s, but his appeal was based on how he wasn't a traditional country singer. He followed the path carved out by Sam Hunt, playing a slinky, digitally streamlined blend of pop, country, and R&B, a mixture that inherently pushed him to the pop side of the equation. Country Again -- a two-part album delivered as two "sides". Side A arrived in April 2021, and its flip is slated for release later in the year, and its intentions are to emphasize Rhett's deep country roots, pushing the modern production into the background without quite removing it. Maybe Country Again (Side A) doesn't glisten with a digital sheen so bright it shines, but it's filled with easy-rolling melodies, steel guitars that give way to programmed beats, and vocal harmonies that are brick-walled with the acoustic guitars and synthesizer; it's a contemporary country record by any measure. There's nothing wrong with leaning toward the pop side of the equation -- it's served Rhett well through the years -- but the problem with Country Again (Side A) is that it's filled with desperate down-home signifiers, canned cornpone nostalgia, and name-dropping designed to convey authenticity. Rhett sings a lot about Eric Church on Country Again (Side A) and the cumulative effect is to drive home how effortless the Chief makes his blend of rock, country, and soul seem. Here, Rhett is straining to hit similar marks, all while wearing a cheerful grin, and it's impossible to hear anything but how hard he's working to sound country. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
From
CD£13.49

Country - Released May 31, 2019 | The Valory Music Co.

On his fourth album, Thomas Rhett proves himself as worthy of pop-crossover stardom as Taylor Swift. Genre boundaries disappear with the first song. "Up," comes on like a piano ballad only to take a fake-out turn into vintage R&B, with bright brass and silky backing vocals. "Don't Threaten Me With a Good Time," a collaboration with Little Big Town, is a feel-good funk strut. "Look What God Gave Her" shimmers with boy-band sunniness. And "Don't Stop Driving" jangles like, of all bands, emo pop-rockers Jimmy Eat World. Even when Rhett veers traditional, he never wallows in his whiskey—the MO is positivity and celebrating his good fortune. "Blessed" sways and swoons with unabashed romance ("I'm not sure where heaven is / But every night I get a glimpse"), "Beer Can't Fix" serves up beach-bum twang and the simple satisfaction that a brew will melt away any blues. The title track and Springsteen-ish "That Old Truck" may delve into misty rear-view nostalgia, but Center Point Road is really about Rhett’s anything-goes future. © Qobuz
From
HI-RES£18.99
CD£13.49

Country - Released May 31, 2019 | The Valory Music Co.

Hi-Res
On his fourth album, Thomas Rhett proves himself as worthy of pop-crossover stardom as Taylor Swift. Genre boundaries disappear with the first song. "Up," comes on like a piano ballad only to take a fake-out turn into vintage R&B, with bright brass and silky backing vocals. "Don't Threaten Me With a Good Time," a collaboration with Little Big Town, is a feel-good funk strut. "Look What God Gave Her" shimmers with boy-band sunniness. And "Don't Stop Driving" jangles like, of all bands, emo pop-rockers Jimmy Eat World. Even when Rhett veers traditional, he never wallows in his whiskey—the MO is positivity and celebrating his good fortune. "Blessed" sways and swoons with unabashed romance ("I'm not sure where heaven is / But every night I get a glimpse"), "Beer Can't Fix" serves up beach-bum twang and the simple satisfaction that a brew will melt away any blues. The title track and Springsteen-ish "That Old Truck" may delve into misty rear-view nostalgia, but Center Point Road is really about Rhett’s anything-goes future. © Qobuz
From
HI-RES£2.99
CD£2.49

Country - Released November 20, 2019 | The Valory Music Co.

Hi-Res
From
CD£14.99

Country - Released October 28, 2016 | The Valory Music Co., LLC

Booklet
Initially lumped in the "bro country" genre, Thomas Rhett steps out as a utility player with his second album. He dips into sweet '50s doo-wop with "Crash and Burn" and funky R&B on the rump-shaking "South Side" (both co-written by, of all people, outlaw country hero Chris Stapleton), not to mention Daft Punk-style disco for the catchy title track. Rhett leans into hip-hop for "Anthem" and the Kesha-ish "Vacation" (which borrows liberally from War's "Lowrider"). On the bouncy "I Feel Good" — yacht-rock smooth but with pontoon lyrics — he leaves it to the pros, as rapper LunchMoney Lewis steps in for the breakdown. But Rhett's at his very best when he lets love melt him like ice cream in the July sun, on tracks such as the Jordin Sparks duet "Playing With Fire" and the flirty "T-Shirt". He's said the slow-burn "Die A Happy Man" is a tribute to his wife, and the timeless ballad sounds like it could've been on country radio in any of the past five decades. © Qobuz
From
CD£13.49

Country - Released September 8, 2017 | The Valory Music Co.

Life Changes is nothing if it's not a literal title. This third album from Thomas Rhett arrives on the heels of 2015's Tangled Up, the album that confirmed his country stardom, an event significant enough to warrant such an album name, but the singer experienced positive personal upheaval too. Just months after adopting an 18-month-old baby, Rhett's wife became pregnant, so the singer became a father twice over in the wake of Tangled Up, an experience he chronicles in the concluding verse of the album's title track. It's a sentimental tale, so it's not surprising he gets a little sticky when he recites autobiographical particulars, but his willingness to open up the entirety of his heart signals how Rhett is a modern man, and Life Changes stands as a testament to that fact. He's a loyal loverman, continuing to seduce his longtime partner years after they fell for each other; he's a smooth talker with a penchant for over-sharing, a tendency that makes him an ideal country-pop star for the age of social media. Life Changes is littered with references to the modern world -- blue check marks on an Instagram, burned CDs, mango green tea, and Coldplay songs -- but, more impressively, the music engages with contemporary pop trends, going far beyond the R&B inclinations of Tangled Up. Notably, Rhett leans hard into dance music, pushing skittering EDM drops on "Leave Right Now" and coating his Maren Morris disco duet "Craving You" with a sleek electronic gloss. Such sly adventure is appealing -- particularly because it's balanced by a good dose of country-soul and such straight-ahead country as "Drink a Little Beer," a duet with his father, Rhett Akins -- but Life Changes isn't just flash; it's grounded by its 14 well-constructed songs. Sometimes that craft is in the service of nothing more than slick radio pop, but the breezy "Smooth Like the Summer" and simmering "Gateway Love" retain their charms after multiple plays due to their sculpted melodies and Rhett's light touch, a quality that helps sell such life lessons as "Sixteen," a song of experience that serves as the counterpoint to the mawkish "Life Changes." But even that title track is expertly assembled, sailing along on a lilting groove and drum loop, evidence that Rhett is as savvy a musician as he is a pop star. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo

Country - Released October 27, 2016 | The Valory Music Co.

Download not available
Thomas Rhett had hits off his 2013 debut It Goes Like This, but Tangled Up, its 2015 successor, feels like the album where the singer/songwriter comes into his own by borrowing moves from fellow country bros Florida Georgia Line and Sam Hunt. Rhett wrote for FGL -- specifically, the hit "Round Here" -- but Tangled Up is by no means as aggressively macho as that duo. It capitalizes on Rhett's soulful streak -- strip away the 21st century consumerism and "Die a Happy Man" easily could've come out of Muscle Shoals in the late '60s -- and also his humor and his allegiance to good times that don't necessarily come from either a honky tonk or a sports bar. Rhett displays an omnivorous cultural appetite that shows he's a millennial: underneath his acoustic guitars are lightly looped beats, but he's also just as likely to push disco to the forefront, as he does on "I Feel Good" and a title track that's happily a glitter ball throwback. Rhett may switch on a Totally '80s Flashback weekend when he's chilling out, but he's a modern guy, dropping passing allusions to Guns N' Roses and Third Eye Blind, hoisting Solo cups filled with Bud Light Lime and splashes of liquor in coconut water, aware that his excursions in neo-disco may bring Michael Jackson to mind but they also sound a bit like Sam Hunt or the Weeknd. By playing both sides of the fence, Rhett may be a bit of an opportunist, but as his hit "Crash and Burn" indicates, there's a sly charm to his eager-to-please modern country: he's a true pop artist, harnessing the trends of his time and turning them into music that's hard to resist. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
From
HI-RES£2.49
CD£1.49

Country - Released March 30, 2020 | The Valory Music Co.

Hi-Res

Country - Released September 8, 2017 | The Valory Music Co.

Download not available
Life Changes is nothing if it's not a literal title. This third album from Thomas Rhett arrives on the heels of 2015's Tangled Up, the album that confirmed his country stardom, an event significant enough to warrant such an album name, but the singer experienced positive personal upheaval too. Just months after adopting an 18-month-old baby, Rhett's wife became pregnant, so the singer became a father twice over in the wake of Tangled Up, an experience he chronicles in the concluding verse of the album's title track. It's a sentimental tale, so it's not surprising he gets a little sticky when he recites autobiographical particulars, but his willingness to open up the entirety of his heart signals how Rhett is a modern man, and Life Changes stands as a testament to that fact. He's a loyal loverman, continuing to seduce his longtime partner years after they fell for each other; he's a smooth talker with a penchant for over-sharing, a tendency that makes him an ideal country-pop star for the age of social media. Life Changes is littered with references to the modern world -- blue check marks on an Instagram, burned CDs, mango green tea, and Coldplay songs -- but, more impressively, the music engages with contemporary pop trends, going far beyond the R&B inclinations of Tangled Up. Notably, Rhett leans hard into dance music, pushing skittering EDM drops on "Leave Right Now" and coating his Maren Morris disco duet "Craving You" with a sleek electronic gloss. Such sly adventure is appealing -- particularly because it's balanced by a good dose of country-soul and such straight-ahead country as "Drink a Little Beer," a duet with his father, Rhett Akins -- but Life Changes isn't just flash; it's grounded by its 14 well-constructed songs. Sometimes that craft is in the service of nothing more than slick radio pop, but the breezy "Smooth Like the Summer" and simmering "Gateway Love" retain their charms after multiple plays due to their sculpted melodies and Rhett's light touch, a quality that helps sell such life lessons as "Sixteen," a song of experience that serves as the counterpoint to the mawkish "Life Changes." But even that title track is expertly assembled, sailing along on a lilting groove and drum loop, evidence that Rhett is as savvy a musician as he is a pop star. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
From
CD£12.49

Country - Released September 25, 2015 | The Valory Music Co., LLC

Booklet
Thomas Rhett had hits off his 2013 debut It Goes Like This, but Tangled Up, its 2015 successor, feels like the album where the singer/songwriter comes into his own by borrowing moves from fellow country bros Florida Georgia Line and Sam Hunt. Rhett wrote for FGL -- specifically, the hit "Round Here" -- but Tangled Up is by no means as aggressively macho as that duo. It capitalizes on Rhett's soulful streak -- strip away the 21st century consumerism and "Die a Happy Man" easily could've come out of Muscle Shoals in the late '60s -- and also his humor and his allegiance to good times that don't necessarily come from either a honky tonk or a sports bar. Rhett displays an omnivorous cultural appetite that shows he's a millennial: underneath his acoustic guitars are lightly looped beats, but he's also just as likely to push disco to the forefront, as he does on "I Feel Good" and a title track that's happily a glitter ball throwback. Rhett may switch on a Totally '80s Flashback weekend when he's chilling out, but he's a modern guy, dropping passing allusions to Guns N' Roses and Third Eye Blind, hoisting Solo cups filled with Bud Light Lime and splashes of liquor in coconut water, aware that his excursions in neo-disco may bring Michael Jackson to mind but they also sound a bit like Sam Hunt or the Weeknd. By playing both sides of the fence, Rhett may be a bit of an opportunist, but as his hit "Crash and Burn" indicates, there's a sly charm to his eager-to-please modern country: he's a true pop artist, harnessing the trends of his time and turning them into music that's hard to resist. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
From
CD£15.99

Country - Released September 21, 2018 | The Valory Music Co.

Life Changes is nothing if it's not a literal title. This third album from Thomas Rhett arrives on the heels of 2015's Tangled Up, the album that confirmed his country stardom, an event significant enough to warrant such an album name, but the singer experienced positive personal upheaval too. Just months after adopting an 18-month-old baby, Rhett's wife became pregnant, so the singer became a father twice over in the wake of Tangled Up, an experience he chronicles in the concluding verse of the album's title track. It's a sentimental tale, so it's not surprising he gets a little sticky when he recites autobiographical particulars, but his willingness to open up the entirety of his heart signals how Rhett is a modern man, and Life Changes stands as a testament to that fact. He's a loyal loverman, continuing to seduce his longtime partner years after they fell for each other; he's a smooth talker with a penchant for over-sharing, a tendency that makes him an ideal country-pop star for the age of social media. Life Changes is littered with references to the modern world -- blue check marks on an Instagram, burned CDs, mango green tea, and Coldplay songs -- but, more impressively, the music engages with contemporary pop trends, going far beyond the R&B inclinations of Tangled Up. Notably, Rhett leans hard into dance music, pushing skittering EDM drops on "Leave Right Now" and coating his Maren Morris disco duet "Craving You" with a sleek electronic gloss. Such sly adventure is appealing -- particularly because it's balanced by a good dose of country-soul and such straight-ahead country as "Drink a Little Beer," a duet with his father, Rhett Akins -- but Life Changes isn't just flash; it's grounded by its 14 well-constructed songs. Sometimes that craft is in the service of nothing more than slick radio pop, but the breezy "Smooth Like the Summer" and simmering "Gateway Love" retain their charms after multiple plays due to their sculpted melodies and Rhett's light touch, a quality that helps sell such life lessons as "Sixteen," a song of experience that serves as the counterpoint to the mawkish "Life Changes." But even that title track is expertly assembled, sailing along on a lilting groove and drum loop, evidence that Rhett is as savvy a musician as he is a pop star. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
From
HI-RES£1.99
CD£1.99

Pop - Released October 23, 2020 | Warner Records

Hi-Res
From
CD£12.49

Country - Released April 30, 2021 | The Valory Music Co.

The very title "Country Again" suggests Thomas Rhett strayed from country music at some point. To an extent, that is true. Rhett scaled the upper reaches of Billboard's Country charts in the 2010s, but his appeal was based on how he wasn't a traditional country singer. He followed the path carved out by Sam Hunt, playing a slinky, digitally streamlined blend of pop, country, and R&B, a mixture that inherently pushed him to the pop side of the equation. Country Again -- a two-part album delivered as two "sides". Side A arrived in April 2021, and its flip is slated for release later in the year, and its intentions are to emphasize Rhett's deep country roots, pushing the modern production into the background without quite removing it. Maybe Country Again (Side A) doesn't glisten with a digital sheen so bright it shines, but it's filled with easy-rolling melodies, steel guitars that give way to programmed beats, and vocal harmonies that are brick-walled with the acoustic guitars and synthesizer; it's a contemporary country record by any measure. There's nothing wrong with leaning toward the pop side of the equation -- it's served Rhett well through the years -- but the problem with Country Again (Side A) is that it's filled with desperate down-home signifiers, canned cornpone nostalgia, and name-dropping designed to convey authenticity. Rhett sings a lot about Eric Church on Country Again (Side A) and the cumulative effect is to drive home how effortless the Chief makes his blend of rock, country, and soul seem. Here, Rhett is straining to hit similar marks, all while wearing a cheerful grin, and it's impossible to hear anything but how hard he's working to sound country. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
From
CD£12.49

Country - Released October 29, 2013 | Universal Music

Thomas Rhett had a pretty good run in the 2000s. The son of country crooner and singer and songwriter Rhett Akins, he's written hits for Jason Aldean ("I Ain't Ready to Quit") and Florida Georgia Line ("Round Here"), as well as putting two of his own singles ("Something to Do with My Hands" and "Beer with Jesus") in the Top 30 country charts, and he hit the top spot in the summer of 2013 with a third single, "It Goes Like This," all of which will earn this debut album a whole lot of attention. Luckily for Rhett, he's ready, and this set, which features the kind of deep, drawled southern vocals and more-rock-and-pop-than-country production that passes for country music a decade and change into the 21st century, will undoubtedly generate another charting single or two, all of which means Rhett is poised to be the next big thing in the genre. It's a solidly professional outing, featuring all three of his singles and other tracks of similar construction, and it's full of energy, good humor, and the kind of backroad good-old-boy wisdom that everybody seems to love these days, even if it feeds more off nostalgia than reality. There really aren't any slack cuts here, although one track, "Sorry for Partyin'," a drunken lurch of a waltz if ever there was one, is a particular highlight. This album should put Rhett over the top as a contemporary country star. © Steve Leggett /TiVo
From
HI-RES£2.49
CD£1.49

Country - Released June 16, 2021 | The Valory Music Co.

Hi-Res
From
CD£1.49

Country - Released March 30, 2020 | The Valory Music Co.

From
CD£1.49

Country - Released June 14, 2019 | The Valory Music Co.

From
CD£3.49

Pop - Released April 13, 2018 | The Valory Music Co.

From
HI-RES£2.49
CD£1.49

Country - Released August 6, 2021 | The Valory Music Co.

Hi-Res
From
CD£1.49

Country - Released August 6, 2021 | The Valory Music Co.