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Alternative & Indie - Released September 15, 2014 | FatCat

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Alternative & Indie - Released September 5, 2018 | Rock Action Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released July 10, 2018 | Rock Action Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released November 13, 2018 | Rock Action Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released December 1, 2018 | Rock Action Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released June 15, 2015 | FatCat Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released February 16, 2015 | FatCat Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released July 1, 2011 | FatCat Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released April 5, 2010 | FatCat Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released March 18, 2007 | FatCat Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released May 20, 2013 | FatCat Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released February 20, 2012 | FatCat Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released November 14, 2011 | FatCat Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released July 1, 2011 | FatCat Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released July 1, 2007 | FatCat Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released September 27, 2010 | FatCat Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released July 1, 2011 | FatCat Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released June 8, 2008 | FatCat Records

Inspired by some stripped-down live sets they played, the Twilight Sad get radically gentle on Here, It Never Snowed. Afterwards It Did. Atmosphere was already one of the strong suits of their debut album, Fourteen Autumns & Fifteen Winters, but the Twilight Sad master it on this EP, making these versions of songs from that album strikingly different from, but just as powerful as, the originals. The mammoth drums and searing guitars that made Fourteen Autumns & Fifteen Winters such a visceral listen are largely replaced by fan organ, glockenspiel, and percussion, and while the results don't sound "unplugged," exactly, they have a unique purity. "Cold Days from the Birdhouse" drifts in on strings and frosty percussion, emphasizing the intimate, homespun feel that previously lurked around the edges of the Twilight Sad's music. On the other hand, "And She Would Darken the Memory" is vast, layering dully roaring guitars that sound like distant jet engines into a ghostly epic. Fittingly enough given its name, Here, It Never Snowed. Afterwards It Did radiates wintry beauty, whether it's the sleigh bells that drive "Walking for Two Hours" or the hypnotically chilly melody of the title track (and lone new song), which only makes James Graham's thick Scottish burr sound warmer and more vulnerable by contrast. The EP's finest moment, however, might be the cover of Daniel Johnston's "Some Things Last a Long Time," where the fan organ underscores the hymnal quality of the song's yearning. Though Here, It Never Snowed. Afterwards It Did offers a change of pace as well as potential directions for the Twilight Sad, it shares the same mix of catharsis and comfort -- not to mention disturbing cover artwork -- that graces all of the band's music, and presents it at its melancholy finest. ~ Heather Phares
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Alternative & Indie - Released October 16, 2015 | FatCat Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released January 17, 2014 | FatCat Records

The Twilight Sad are one of the more conventional-sounding bands on Fat Cat -- that is, if cathartic, widescreen rock augmented by accordions and melodies rooted in Scottish folk can be called conventional. Fourteen Autumns & Fifteen Winters expands on the searing, earnest sound of the band's self-titled EP; indeed, several of the Twilight Sad's best songs are also highlights here. "That Summer, at Home I Became the Invisible Boy" just might be the band's definitive song: guitars shimmer and build up into poetic squalls; James Graham's appealingly thick Scottish burr imbues lyrics like "Kids are on fire in the bedroom" with tenderness; Mark Devine's powerful but nuanced drumming cuts a swath through the melody but doesn't overpower it; and accordions add an unexpected, homespun warmth. "And She Would Darken the Memory" is another standout that underscores the similarity between the Twilight Sad's sound and the luminously anthemic side of the Walkmen or Interpol. However, the Twilight Sad have a more free-flowing approach than either of those bands, especially on the stunning "Talking with Fireworks/Here, It Never Snowed," which comes in like a lion with torrents of drums and guitars, and goes out like a lamb with a sparkling, hypnotic guitar melody. "Last Year's Rain Didn't Fall So Hard" is a gorgeous glimpse of a song that fades in and out, suggesting that it goes on forever, a feeling echoed by the instrumental title track, which closes the album with more of the wonderful atmosphere that makes the rest of Fourteen Autumns & Fifteen Winters accessible, but ultimately far from conventional. The density of the Twilight Sad's sound evokes wide open spaces, yet the louder they are, the more intimate they sound -- these kinds of paradoxes make this album a powerful debut. ~ Heather Phares

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The Twilight Sad in the magazine
  • Highland Punk
    Highland Punk The Twilight Sad's IT WON/T BE LIKE THIS ALL THE TIME is in Hi-Res 24-Bit on Qobuz!