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Alternative & Indie - Released September 8, 2003 | DFA Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Pitchfork: Best New Music
One 12", produced and released by the DFA, transformed the Rapture from a benign indie band into hot hot sh*t. Once "House of Jealous Lovers" -- a horrifically mangled jolt with a viscous rhythmic vroom as dynamite as anything from the late-'70s U.K. post-punk bands -- took hold in the underground, anticipation for this album built, built, and kept on building. Has the wait paid off? Yes and no. It has, in a sense, because that single seemed like a case of capturing lightning in a bottle -- a one-off that would define an otherwise extremely average band -- and Echoes ably proves that it was no fluke. The wait hasn't paid off, in a sense, because hype turned Echoes into a monolithic event when, in truth, it turns out that only half of it proves "House of Jealous Lovers" to be no fluke. The lesser half nearly chokes the album, as it casts the Rapture as the same rickety band that it was before the rebirth. "Open Up Your Heart," daringly placed as the third track, is a hollow, momentum-killing piano ballad; on "Love Is All," multiple Southern boogie elements prove to be a mismatch; "Infatuation" closes the album with a murmur. Another detracting feature is the overuse of Luke Jenner's Robert Smith, which is oftentimes more glaring than Paul Banks' Ian Curtis and Jack White's Robert Plant put together. However, when the band is on, it is on. Nearly toppling their previous best, "I Need Your Love" is propelled by a relentlessly thumping backbeat, an unshakable keyboard vamp, and gurgling keyboards -- it's the band's second stroke of indie-dance genius. "The Coming of Spring" is another frantic neo-post-punk slasher, with wonderfully needling guitars cleaved by a Nuggets-worthy breakdown. Lastly, opener "Olio" will be pure heaven for those who secretly wished that Chicago house legend Larry Heard would one day swap out Robert Owens in favor of Robert Smith. These flashes of greatness don't quite add up to what could have been, but the album as a whole is still quite exceptional. © Andy Kellman /TiVo
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Pop - Released September 8, 2003 | EMI

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Pitchfork: Best New Music
One 12", produced and released by the DFA, transformed the Rapture from a benign indie band into hot hot sh*t. Once "House of Jealous Lovers" -- a horrifically mangled jolt with a viscous rhythmic vroom as dynamite as anything from the late-'70s U.K. post-punk bands -- took hold in the underground, anticipation for this album built, built, and kept on building. Has the wait paid off? Yes and no. It has, in a sense, because that single seemed like a case of capturing lightning in a bottle -- a one-off that would define an otherwise extremely average band -- and Echoes ably proves that it was no fluke. The wait hasn't paid off, in a sense, because hype turned Echoes into a monolithic event when, in truth, it turns out that only half of it proves "House of Jealous Lovers" to be no fluke. The lesser half nearly chokes the album, as it casts the Rapture as the same rickety band that it was before the rebirth. "Open Up Your Heart," daringly placed as the third track, is a hollow, momentum-killing piano ballad; on "Love Is All," multiple Southern boogie elements prove to be a mismatch; "Infatuation" closes the album with a murmur. Another detracting feature is the overuse of Luke Jenner's Robert Smith, which is oftentimes more glaring than Paul Banks' Ian Curtis and Jack White's Robert Plant put together. However, when the band is on, it is on. Nearly toppling their previous best, "I Need Your Love" is propelled by a relentlessly thumping backbeat, an unshakable keyboard vamp, and gurgling keyboards -- it's the band's second stroke of indie-dance genius. "The Coming of Spring" is another frantic neo-post-punk slasher, with wonderfully needling guitars cleaved by a Nuggets-worthy breakdown. Lastly, opener "Olio" will be pure heaven for those who secretly wished that Chicago house legend Larry Heard would one day swap out Robert Owens in favor of Robert Smith. These flashes of greatness don't quite add up to what could have been, but the album as a whole is still quite exceptional. © Andy Kellman /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released April 30, 2012 | DFA

Prior to the making of In the Grace of Your Love, lead singer and lyricist Luke Jenner became a father, lost his mother through suicide, and converted to Catholicism. The events naturally had a major impact -- one far greater than the departure of bassist Matt Safer -- on the Rapture's fourth album. The dramatic changes in Jenner’s life supplied him with a lot to work through, and they’ve fostered the most focused, song-oriented set of Rapture material -- one in which death, devotion, and children are recurring themes, expressed in states of deep anguish and redemptive joy. Despite a five-year gap in releases, the band’s sound has not changed significantly, as it remains rooted in a form of dance-rock inspired by post-punk and new wave with the occasional diversion into full-on dance music (lean and dubby on “Come Back to Me”; blaring and gospel-oriented on “How Deep Is Your Love?,” not a Blaze cover). Cassius’ Philippe Zdar produced it all, and like another album with his touch, Phoenix's Wolfgang Amadeus Phoenix, the shorter and longer songs both seem ideally constructed, as if he knows when to tell a band when to stop or elaborate. While it might not be as adventurous as Echoes or pack the swagger of Pieces of the People We Love, In the Grace of Your Love is the band’s most powerful and vital album thus far. © Andy Kellman /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released September 5, 2011 | DFA

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Alternative & Indie - Released July 25, 2011 | DFA

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Pop - Released September 12, 2006 | EMI

Produced by the team of Paul Epworth and Ewan Pearson (eight tracks), as well as Danger Mouse (two tracks), Pieces of the People We Love is much different from Echoes in that it's no patchwork (i.e., like four Primal Scream albums condensed into one). Additionally, Luke Jenner's potentially deal-breaking vocal tics of old, especially the Robert Smith-with-a-finger-caught-in-an-electric-socket caterwaul, are kept in check, while bassist Matt Safer's appealingly insolent presence on vocals is ratcheted up to several lead turns. The uniformity of the album is at the expense of clear-cut standout tracks. There are no equivalents to "House of Jealous Lovers" or "I Need Your Love." Just the same, the low points are not as low. Neither Danger Mouse production, despite being two of the album's big selling points, is crucial to the makeup: "Pieces of the People We Love," a glammy rave-up, features some deeply buried background vocals from Cee-Lo, while "Calling Me" is a splattered mess. The Epworth and Pearson tracks, several of which explode with energy (whether fueled by joy or embitterment), are built on the kind of thick low end and non-congealing layers heard in Pearson's extensive remix work for Goldfrapp, Depeche Mode, and Closer Musik. At least two songs are about being in the Rapture. Even if Safer's being lighthearted or sarcastic in "Whoo! Alright Yeah...Uh Huh" -- "But is it lyrical genius or crap rock poetry?/I say the lineage runs Morrison, Patti Smith [spelt "Smyth" in the booklet, snicker snicker], then me," as well as a refrain that mocks their motionless concert attendees -- the sentiments are better off ignored. "The Sound," a kind of modern-day "Have a Cigar," also carries awkwardly antagonistic and jaded feelings. While few things are more dire than listening to a band complain about being in a band, these two songs also happen to contain some of the album's most thrilling moments, careening every which way with ballistic force. © Andy Kellman /TiVo
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Rock - Released May 22, 2001 | Sub Pop Records

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Pop - Released January 1, 2003 | EMI

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Pop - Released January 1, 2003 | EMI

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House - Released June 17, 2013 | Toolroom

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Techno - Released May 17, 2014 | Magnatune

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Ambient - Released September 18, 2020 | Magnatune

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Alternative & Indie - Released May 14, 2012 | DFA

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Alternative & Indie - Released January 16, 2012 | DFA

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Pop - Released January 1, 2006 | EMI

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Pop - Released January 1, 2006 | EMI

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Pop - Released January 1, 2006 | EMI

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Pop - Released January 1, 2006 | EMI

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Pop - Released January 1, 2006 | EMI

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Pop - Released January 1, 2006 | EMI